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Thread: Adam W. Spies Eagles and others

  1. #26
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    Adding another Spies marked sword with mixed etching.
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  2. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by JV Puleo View Post
    I don't see Bruce Bazelon's Directory of Military Good Dealers mentioned here. Because Spies was basically that, he is covered in great detail. You may need both volumes... the books are a little confusing to use because Volume II only included information found after the publication of Volume I. Thus, some makers are in both volumes and you need to read both citations. All of these NY military hardware dealers are covered extensively and, more to the point, Bruce used only primary sources.
    Having found a combined edition of Bazelon's directory, I will no doubt be spending some time in perusing the entries. There is some confirmation of assembled data and an underscore that we are indeed looking at one man 1800-1887 and that he traveled to England to set up business. The timelines are still muddled a little in all authors notes but it becomes apparent (to me anyway) that the sword imports were chiefly (no sooner than) the 1830s, with unknown quantities sold until his leaving the trade in 1865. It is that date which seems to cause confusion and from Bazelon's notes, the New York Times obit right as rain for this dealer. To me, it does put to bed some of my hunches as accurate but there is yet more unanswered.. I suppose I should consolidate the assembled data from this thread in some homogeneous manner.

    Thanks for the tip on Bazelon's volume. Price per pound, it seems to be a good one.

    Cheers

    GC

  3. #28
    Bought this sword 5 days a ago. A,W,Spies. has 6 engravings with gold, 15 star eagle and a shield, bone handle, early brass guard. She has a 29 3/4 inch blade. Has that early look and it's in my 1812 display, be it as a pre or post, it looks great.





  4. #29
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    Thanks for sharing this new addition. The general styling was somewhat "timeless" during the early 19th century.

    There are still some differences on the timeline of Spies traveling to England to scope out the market. That he is having his etching added to blades means a serious relationship with his Birmingham associations. It was way back on the net that I had first looked at a Spies marked sword and my impressions even then was a sword of the 1830s. There are the undeniable similarities to the early stylings, including blue&gilt blades, but a truth emerges once marked to Spies.

    My continuing crusading to show a lot of blue&gilt past the Mexican War may seem a blow to 1812 aficionados but so, so many of the swords belong to later decades. In many ways, it seems the trade stood quite still for three decades of import. While that may seem impossible, there are some undeniable truths when marked swords place a type in time quite accurately.

    Lurking in the wings is one style in particular that shows a real insight into how much later in the 19th century some of these swords were being produced and imported but that is (while salient to dating Spies marked swords) a thread that belongs to a different topic and more noted maker/importer (Widmann)

    Cheers

    GC.
    Last edited by Glen C.; 03-02-2018 at 03:49 AM.

  5. #30
    Post 1815 AW Spies. Still when I saw it, I had to have it.

  6. #31
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    Feb 2002
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    A crazy combination/composite had been listed for months. I add some of the images here, as the blade itself is a bit peculiar for a Spies etched blade.

    Re blued and a fabricated scabbard? I have to wonder. An interesting piece, nonetheless. A composite raising a few questions (imo). There were many, many photos. I think I have them all (if interested) and the hilt repairs along with the scabbard and peen all lend to a very worked sword. For the life of me, I have never seen this hilt type associated with the NYC crowd of retailers and falls into the classification of being quite singular. There are usually clues showing their disparate origins. Some of the etchings quite interesting. There are some fifty images posted to that listing, so I have all the etching detail.

    Cheers
    GC
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