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Thread: Bring out the brutes!

  1. #51
    Cathey,
    Will uses photobucket.com and posts images using image tags like this: [img]image url[/img].

    Jonathan

  2. #52
    Join Date
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    I transfer my photos to photobucket then use the IMG address and copy it to the forums reply as if I posted a picture here. Find the bathroom door opening in one of the pictures. The anvils would be good for making a sword??
    I did find two bayonets and a Scottish WW1 scabbard, How??



  3. #53
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    Ottawa, Canada
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    Will,

    I picked this particular location over about 10 years ago. I go back at least once a year. Found a decent 1853 and a Brown Bess in the bathroom behind the door, in the very umbrella stand you showed in your second picture!

    Great place if you have the patience.

    Rob
    Vir prudens non contra ventum mingit

  4. #54
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    Since everything gets piled on top, I wonder how much good old stuff is buried deep. I did not risk opening any cabinet doors for fear of a avalanche.
    I did not risk the bathroom, so thats where they hide them!

  5. #55
    I found this thread and though it's old it resonates with my recent interest in Austrian Heavy Cavalry swords. My picture however is of my British Cav Brute. 1770's....
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    Peace, Love, SWORDS!

  6. #56
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
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    Wokingham, UK
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    Here's my offering: inelegant, slightly wobbly fuller and heavier than it looks. The hilt's that of an Italian M1860 but who knows what the blade is from.

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  7. #57
    These are my two brutes a 1796 Light Cavalry Officers fighting sword with really wide blade and a French Model ANXI sabre.
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  8. #58
    I saw your post on this earlier Mr. Ford, such a great looking/interesting sword!
    Michael, those two swords make a splendid pair. And both with scabbards no less!
    I have one more "Brute" to post, but it will have to wait for a decent camera. It's another 1770's sword. Like Mr. Ford's "Italian Cutlass" it's far heavier than it looks. The POB is 8 inches from the hilt.
    Last edited by morgan butler; 04-02-2016 at 08:54 AM.
    Peace, Love, SWORDS!

  9. #59
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    Nov 2013
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    Starr m1812 militia sabre

    I do really enjoy the Italian m1840 steel hilt S&Ks and tas a matter of fact any S&K.They are brutes, but I would not want to over look the Starr m1812/13 as they are pretty close to Americas second American made contract sword. Depending on if you count Starr m1810 or the Rose m1812 before them. This one I picked up on the usual site and is not a contract sword as it is unmarked but in detail and style it very much is a CW stamped Starr, exactly like the first 1000 and a true brute. Most I handle are still sharp and a suprising number of the Starr m1812/13s survive in fair shape for swords of many wars. A very durable, plain jane and well built sword. Eric
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    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  10. #60
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    Oct 2014
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    Thank you, Morgan - it certainly is. I just wish I could identify it and so value it. I know this is a sword-centric forum but perhaps I'll be forgiven for posting a bayonet. This is my M1914 Swiss Pioneer and, as bayonets go, it's quite a brute with its saw teeth, length and swell-point.

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  11. #61
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    Montreal , Canada
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    Gentlemen,
    Here is my French cuirassier An XIII saber.
    Found under a heavy coat of varnish, old style fashion to protect a sword.
    A pain to clean but the result is astounding.
    Dan


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  12. #62
    Join Date
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    Since this thread first came out I've picked up my all-time brute, easily beating out the 1796 HC, 1811 Blucher and my Italian 1860. Actual origin is still unknown, but my 1796 LC has an inferiority complex when next to it.

    Although not easy to see differences between them, the brute weighs in a 1.22kg vs. the 1796 at .970kg. With scabbard the brute is 2.19kg vs. the 1796 coming in at 1.6kg. The 1796 scabbard was also one of my heavier ones, being a rounded Osbourne. Lastly the blade width of this cleaver is 1 3/4" at the hilt, flaring to near 1 7/8" near tip.

    Rob

    Last edited by Rob O'Reilly; 04-04-2016 at 06:12 PM.
    Vir prudens non contra ventum mingit

  13. #63
    Wow! Very interesting hilt.....What is the grip made of?
    Peace, Love, SWORDS!

  14. #64
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    It's leather wrapped wood.
    Vir prudens non contra ventum mingit

  15. #65
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    My own beast: a Spanish M1815 LC sabre. A very stout, menacing looking weapon, 1,3 Kg of steel and brass... the heaviest "light" I've ever had in hand...
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    Remember, what is light is the Cavalry, not always their swords!

    JJ
    SI, SI
    NO, NON

  16. #66
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    Juan, what years would these have seen service? She is a beaut. Eric
    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  17. #67
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    Roughly 1815-1840, when it was replaced by the 1840 pattern. Maybe a bit more, depending on the regiment. This pattern saw heavy service in the first Carlist War (a succession civil war) and other internal revolts. Almost all the troopers' examples I've seen have signs of real use. This one has.

    Best,
    Juan J.
    SI, SI
    NO, NON

  18. #68
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
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    L'abbaye de Theleme
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    Once a year I post this thing to see if somebody has info about it. its "brutishness" is a good excuse to bring it to this thread.

    I think it is a Swedish cavalry sword from about 1630s; the quillons are typical. But I never got confirmation of that. It is 114cm long, 93cm of blade, and weights 1425 gr.. The grip is made for a gauntlet and it has a thumb ring (too large for a naked hand). In spite of its size and weight handles nicely. No marks. Wood grip has imprinted missing wire marks.

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    La vida amable, el enemigo hombre fuerte, ordinario el peligro, natural la defensa, la Ciencia para conseguirla infalible, su estudio forçoso, y el exercicio necessario conviene al que huviere de ser Diestro, no ignore la teorica, para que en la practica, el cuerpo, el braço, y los instrumentos obren lo conveniente a su perfeccion. --Don Luis Pacheco de Narvaez.

  19. #69
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    A couple of naval brutes

    Namely my P1804 cutlass and the French 'Sabre de Bord' M An IX. Definitely unadorned...
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  20. #70
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    Always thought this had a wicked blade and tough hilt.
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  21. #71
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    My slotted hilt has a knuckle duster/brutish quality.
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  22. #72
    This Brit Infantry Officer sword is quite larger than the usual pattern. It has 31 inches long double edged blade that's 1.25 at the forte, and the hilt construction is of a larger scale than other examples. You'll notice that it has a big, featureless rear quillion that won't snap off like the normal slender, fluted ones that often are missing on these types. Very large pommel as well, 4 inches around. This sword would be able to stand up to heavier cavalry weapons. It's heavy duty and beautiful. Built for battle among line troops, it's a brute.
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    Last edited by morgan butler; 04-17-2016 at 03:20 PM.
    Peace, Love, SWORDS!

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