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Thread: Please need help: What kind of Dao, how old?

  1. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Posts
    618
    Quote Originally Posted by jonpalombi View Post
    #3. More recently, during the Cultural Revolution, Mao's Red Guard went door-to-door collecting steel from the masses. As it was explained to me, thousands of woks were taken, farming tools and possibly family heirlooms like swords? Today we take it for granted but steel was a very valuable material in prior times.
    Given that the blades survive, and not the mounts, I'd expect that the mounts were the more valuable part, at least as far as recycling went. Swords with steel mounts, especially plain steel mounts, would be more likely to survive intact. Brass and bronze are much easier to home-recycle by casting than steel. Anything gold, gold-plated, or just gold-looking might be stripped, just on the chance it turns out to be gold.

    (Not thinking especially about the Cultural Revolution, just recycling of metals over the last few centuries.)

    There are many Caucasian shashkas with very crude mounts, home-carved wooden grips in place of the original highly-ornamented silver or silver-decorated grips. Seems there was a tax on silver-mounted swords at one time, so swords were modified.
    "In addition to being efficient, all pole arms were quite nice to look at." - Cherney Berg, A hideous history of weapons, Collier 1963.

  2. #27
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    West Yorkshire, England.
    Posts
    249

    Thankyou

    Thankyou for taking the time to answere my query. I wondered myself if a lot of the sword stripping was due to the intrinsic value of the mounts. Recently here in England there was a major find of gold sword mounts from the Anglo Saxon era, apparently looted and buried.
    My apologies for going off topic, but I am hunting up info all over the Chinese postings for my own sword project and was intrigued by your comment.
    Myself, I believe the blade is the heart of the sword, and if that is good, the mounts are secondary, provided you have not paid gold prices for brass.

  3. #28

    "dao"

    The solid connection of the habaki (not sure of the chinese word for this item) to the steel indicates this sword was cast in low grade steel. The area around the "habaki" was then ground away to define the edges as can be seen in the pictures. It was then plated and "aged" using a nitric acis solution which will pit out the metal and give it a grey appearance. The sword in it's entirety is a complete reproduction piece. Further if you look at any real Dao you can see the Blood lines are always straight and done by the hand of an artist. Only a cast blade would show such incongruencies in the blood grooves or as they are called in Japanese swords Bo-Hi.
    This of course is just my humble opinion.
    Jim

  4. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by jim rousch View Post
    The solid connection of the habaki (not sure of the chinese word for this item) to the steel indicates this sword was cast in low grade steel. The area around the "habaki" was then ground away to define the edges as can be seen in the pictures. It was then plated and "aged" using a nitric acis solution which will pit out the metal and give it a grey appearance. The sword in it's entirety is a complete reproduction piece. Further if you look at any real Dao you can see the Blood lines are always straight and done by the hand of an artist. Only a cast blade would show such incongruencies in the blood grooves or as they are called in Japanese swords Bo-Hi.
    This of course is just my humble opinion.
    Jim

    The sword in the picture clearly shows signs of being folded and not cast. While the age and auhenticity may be questionable the sword itself certainly looks like a hand made item

  5. #30
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin
    Posts
    501
    Quote Originally Posted by jim rousch View Post
    The solid connection of the habaki (not sure of the chinese word for this item) to the steel indicates this sword was cast in low grade steel. The area around the "habaki" was then ground away to define the edges as can be seen in the pictures. It was then plated and "aged" using a nitric acis solution which will pit out the metal and give it a grey appearance. The sword in it's entirety is a complete reproduction piece. Further if you look at any real Dao you can see the Blood lines are always straight and done by the hand of an artist. Only a cast blade would show such incongruencies in the blood grooves or as they are called in Japanese swords Bo-Hi.
    This of course is just my humble opinion.
    Jim
    Though I will not comment on the age of this piece I will say that Jim is incorrect at to the manufacturing...the pattern welding of the blade can NOT be cast..ever. This is a pattern welded blade..period.
    As to the grooves (called fullers) being straight on old work..well..again...it is hand cut....and as such can be off and wander and vary in depth. That said the better the smith and more expensive the piece the better the work.

    Ric
    Richard Furrer
    Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin
    http://doorcountyforgeworks.com/

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