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Thread: Some interesting old photos with swords

  1. #126
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    Here are a couple of Views of Wilkinsons Showrooms 27/28 Pall Mall 1896.

    The left Photo is the 1st Floor and the right hand photo the staircase from ground floor to first floor.

    Many of the items displayed (and there were lots more) were moved to 53 pall mall in 1909. Many were destroyed when Pall Mall was bombed in WW2 and the remains mostly water damaged etc moved to the Acton Factory shortly afterwards.
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  2. #127
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    US Army Ordnance Sergeant in a pattern 1874 Sack Coat and 1872 Forage Cap sometime between 1884 and 1892 based on the chevrons. The sword is a 1860 Staff and Field Officer's sword that was probably a photographer's prop. While a similar SFO version was made for NCO's in 1872 in addition to the 1840 NCO Sword still in use, both models used leather frogs with frog studs on the scabbards instead of suspension rings. (Photo originally posted by George Wheeler)



    Three National Guard officers in camp circa 1905-1915. They were probably the company commander and lieutenants of one infantry company, although I can't read the ranks on their shoulder straps. Their regimental and branch insignia are visible on their collars, and some of their marksmanship badges are state and not federal. Notable are the 1902 Officer's Swords suspended by chain through an opening in their pattern 1903 Dress Coats, similar to US naval uniforms today. Later blue uniforms required an external belt to wear the sword.
    Last edited by Bob Smalser; 01-27-2012 at 09:46 AM.

  3. #128
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    Bob,

    Here is a thread on the discussion of the US 1872 Staff NCO sword and this photo of the Ordnance Sergeant wearing the officer version of the sword.

    http://www.swordforum.com/forums/sho...1872+nco+sword

    George
    "You can't please everyone, so you have to please yourself." Ricky Nelson

  4. #129
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    This photo came from Bill Fisher showing the 7th Hussars sharpening there 1885 or 1890 pattern cavalry trooper's swords, thanks Bill and Robert.
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    David Gray

  5. #130
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    Mungo Park 1771-1806

    Born at Foulshiels, Scotland, one of fourteen children of a tenant farmer he was a pioneer of exploration, botanist, medical doctor, David Livingstone followed his path. He and what remained of his 40 man party were attacked and killed at Bousa Rapids while looking for the source of the Niger River.
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    David Gray

  6. #131
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    The Royal Company of Archers

    Founded in 1676 as the Kings bodyguard in Scotland and to keep up the sport of archery. Major James Shelley Bontein of Glencruitten was painted around 1910. Photo's 2 and 3 are from c 1900 and possibly of Jack Gilmour at Montrave, Fife. The last two are from 1953 and only the second time the Honours of Scotland have been out in public since the Scottish parliament was disbanded in 1707, the first was for George in 1822. The side arms the Archers carry are brass hilted, 67cm in length with a 52cm single fullered double edge blade, scabbards are gilt and leather.
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    David Gray

  7. #132
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    Allan Laing Horse Guard, Falkirk, Denny, 1888

    Allan Laing of Langhill farm obtained a reference from his minister in 1883 in support of his application to join the Horseguard.
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    David Gray

  8. #133
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    This is a facebook site with a similar aim to the one of this thread, but just for Spanish swords. By the author of a recent book on the subject:

    http://www.facebook.com/pages/Vicent...604119?sk=wall
    La vida amable, el enemigo hombre fuerte, ordinario el peligro, natural la defensa, la Ciencia para conseguirla infalible, su estudio forçoso, y el exercicio necessario conviene al que huviere de ser Diestro, no ignore la teorica, para que en la practica, el cuerpo, el braço, y los instrumentos obren lo conveniente a su perfeccion. --Don Luis Pacheco de Narvaez.

  9. #134
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    US Naval Academy "broadsword" training picture
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    "Please look in the encyclopedia and make a brief memorandum for me concerning the life of Correggio."
    Elbert Hubbard

    Nakamura Ryu Batto Do, Order of Seven Hearts

  10. #135
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    postcard of cadets/soldiers(?) fencing on a beam in Liege
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    "Please look in the encyclopedia and make a brief memorandum for me concerning the life of Correggio."
    Elbert Hubbard

    Nakamura Ryu Batto Do, Order of Seven Hearts

  11. #136
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    Quote Originally Posted by Javier Ramos View Post
    This is a facebook site with a similar aim to the one of this thread, but just for Spanish swords. By the author of a recent book on the subject:

    http://www.facebook.com/pages/Vicent...604119?sk=wall
    Javier:

    That's a nice collection of photos. A pity it is on Facebook, where many of us will not tread.

    The Spanish weapons of the 1830-50s are very interesting and quite underestimated, in my opinion.

    What is the title of the book that you mentioned?

    Below: mi pequeño tesoro.
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  12. #137
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    Quote Originally Posted by David gray View Post
    The Hall was built in 1513 for James 1V, converted to barracks in the 1650's, a hospital from 1800-1887 and then in 1890 and now it's used for weapon's display, swords a plenty. The stained glass windows are Victorian and the hammerbeam roof is by James Drummond.
    i have used some of these displays as the design bases for some of my persona display

  13. #138
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    Mark,
    Photos from the facebook can also be found on that website (http://www.vicentetoledo.es).
    The book Javier mentioned is Espadas Españolas, Militares y Civiles also advertised on above site.
    David

  14. #139
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    Mark,
    Photos from the facebook can also be found on that website (http://www.vicentetoledo.es).
    The book Javier mentioned is Espadas Españolas, Militares y Civiles also advertised on above site.
    David

  15. #140
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    Sorry, this is an off-topic...
    Mark, I think "your little treasure" is not Spanish, even when certainly the hexagonal blades are typical from Toledo. 1820-1850 saw a lot of otherwise very nice Solingen swords marked as "Toledo" for the South American new republics, and this seems to me one of them. Langlets are very unusual in Spanish swords, if you check under them maybe you will find a hidden Solingen mark. Also the etching with broad flat fields is unusual in Spanish sword, they are full of lines.

    PD I think I have a picture somewhere of a very similar blade (with presumably faux Toledo inscription) attached to a an Scottish hilt. PD Checked, and not similar.
    Last edited by Javier Ramos; 04-18-2012 at 06:36 AM.
    La vida amable, el enemigo hombre fuerte, ordinario el peligro, natural la defensa, la Ciencia para conseguirla infalible, su estudio forçoso, y el exercicio necessario conviene al que huviere de ser Diestro, no ignore la teorica, para que en la practica, el cuerpo, el braço, y los instrumentos obren lo conveniente a su perfeccion. --Don Luis Pacheco de Narvaez.

  16. #141
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    Javier:

    I'll PM you to continue our conversation, rather than disrupt the thread. Thanks!

    Mark

  17. #142
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    Hi, everyone!

    I'm new to the Forum, but here are three Civil War CDV's in my collection showing Union officers with their sidearms. The first is a Matthew Brady photograph of Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan, "The Young Napoleon", in an appropriate pose ca. 1861 - 62 with a regulation M.1860 Sword for Officers of the Staff and Field; next is a late-war infantry officer in a photograph dated on the back May, 1865, with a regulation foot officer's sword; and lastly, a mid-war company-grade infantry officer of the Union Third Corps with a nice non-regulation Peterson #75. Hope you like them!
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    Last edited by James Neel; 05-02-2012 at 04:46 PM.

  18. #143
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    Thanks, James. Nice to see a non-reg!
    mark@swordforum.com

    ~ Hostem Hastarum Cuspidibus Salutemus ~

    "Those who beat their swords into plowshares usually end up plowing for those who don't."
    Benjamin Franklin

  19. #144
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    Being so new to the Forum, I only hope this is "Kosher" ( pun intended! ), because these photographs are NOT mine! Though I've bought a few of the common postcard photo portraits of soldiers of the Third Reich, none of them thus far have been armed with swords or sabres. These are some I copied from eBay auctions when I was first becoming re-interested in the swords and sabres of Nazi Germany. ( I only have 3 very common examples of them so far. ) Most of these are NCO's with the very plain nickel-hilted NCO sabre. The first, however, is interesting being an officer in the pre-regulation of 1934 period before wearing the NEW "national symbol" ( breast eagle and swastika ) became mandatory.
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  20. #145
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    Here's another Civil War subject from my collection I'd overlooked - This Union officer is unidentified, but shared a double-case with another quarter-plate ambrotype showing two enlisted men, likely his brothers or cousins, from the 13th Wisconsin Vol. Inf. ca. 1861 or 1862, readily identifiable from their distinctive non-regulation uniforms and arms. The young officer, however, conforms to regulation in every respect, right down to his standard M.1850 Sword for Foot Officers. Unfortunately, I discovered the 13th was a "do-nothing" regiment that spent their entire career guarding forts, railroads, and riverboat landings throughout central Tennessee and northern Alabama; to their "credit" ( ? ) one entire company was "gobbled up" by Confederate cavalry while manning a blockhouse guarding a railroad trestle. Oh well, "They also serve..."!
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  21. #146
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    John Allen

    Inlaid with brass hilt with broadblade the hilt was made by John Allen jr around 1740-55 his initials JA/S the S for Stirling, blade made in Germany. The making of quality Basket Hilts in Stirling appears to have started in 1714 when john Allen sr moved there from Doune. Some of Allen's best hilts are decorated in the same style as Doune pistols. The hilt by itself was made by John Allen sr one of the finest armourers and obviously an artist from early 18c. Typically the maker has his initials JA with an S for Stirling on the underside. He has his full name and the date 1731 on the loops. Thanks to James and everyone else who posted old photos.
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    David Gray

  22. #147
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    I love that we have some young swashbucklers on a plank no less
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  23. #148
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    Colin MacKenzie in 1881

    Piper in the Cameronians, 26th Regiment of Foot (Scottish Rifles) c1881
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    David Gray

  24. #149
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    Captain (later General) John T Myer, USMC...
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  25. #150
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    Culzean Castle Armoury

    with a few swords of course
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    David Gray

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