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Thread: Some interesting old photos with swords

  1. #26
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    Captain Lord Kirkwall Crimea 1855

    This is full name Captain, Lord, George William Hamilton Viscount Kirkwall. Photo taken in the Crimea in 1855 an officer of the 71st Highlanders with his pet dog and what looks like a Light Cavalry pattern sword.
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    David Gray

  2. #27
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    Honours of Scotland

    The sword of Scotland is of fine Italian workmanship and a gift from Pope Julius 11 to James !V in 1507. The grip and pommel are hammered silver plate decorated with repousse work and gilded. The etching on the blade is or was inlaid with gold. The sword and scabbard were made by Italian cutler Domenica de Sutri. At the ricasso it's 44mm, the blade is 991mm and 137.8cm in total, the hilt is 38.74cm the traverse guard is 43.8cm tip to tip. The Honours of Scotland are the oldest sovereign regalia in the UK, now kept in Edinburgh Castle. The crown room was built for this purpose in 1615-17, the Stone of Destiny was added to the room in 1996. The large oak chest was where the Honours were kept hidden for about 100 years in a walled up room.
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    David Gray

  3. #28
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    Here we have the sword of Sir John de Graham, killed in action at the battle of Falkirk on July 22, 1298. He is buried at St.Modan's churchyard, High St, Falkirk.
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    David Gray

  4. #29
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    S bar

    This S-bar basket hilt with Andrea Ferara on each side of the blade was carried by Covenanter Matthew Craig of Plowland at Bothwell Bridge in 1679. At this battle in South Lanarkshire a 10,000 strong Gov force defeated a smaller army of Covenanters.
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    David Gray

  5. #30
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    "Bonnie Dundee", John Graham of Claverhouse, "Bloody Clavers" served as a volunteer in the French and Dutch armies before returning to Scotland in 1678. He fought the covenanters at Bothwell bridge in 1679 and raised a Highland army for James V11 to fight William of Orange, he defeated the Goverment army at the Pass of Killiecrankie but was himself killed and oposition against William faded. The basket hilt is the type used by many of the Highlanders. In case your following this man is indeed related to Sir John de Graham
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    Last edited by David gray; 04-25-2011 at 12:41 PM.
    David Gray

  6. #31
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    David. That is either one very large sword or one very short Tyler. I shudder to think what it must have been like to face Sir John while he was swinging it with two hands.
    "Ancora imparo - Michelangelo Buonarotti"

  7. #32
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    Hello Robert, unfortunatly i can't find any dimensions of the sword or the man so no way of knowing how big the sword really is but i'll keep looking. Sir William Wallace was a good friend of Sir John de Graham. In the first shot security guards are taking the sword from the Wallace memorial to exhibit in Glasgow in 1964. Sir William Wallace 1272-1305 fought for Scotlands independance over 700 yrs ago. He was a Scottish patriot and national hero, he was betrayed and executed in London in 1305. His body parts were sent to various locations as a warning to others who may wish to follow him, so no grave. This sword in total is 162cm and the blade itself is 132cm being slightly shorter than originally due to fracture, it is 3kg in weight.
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    Last edited by David gray; 04-26-2011 at 12:05 PM.
    David Gray

  8. #33
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    David. Never having had the desire to put a large sum of money into a medievel sword I purchased a Del Tin hand and a half sword some years ago. I wanted to see what it felt like holding it. I just went and measured it and it is a total of 44 inches long. Converting your metric measurements the blade alone on the Wallace sword is almost 59 inches long and has been shortened! That being the case the blade was originally 5 feet.

    I was a little confused where you said the total length of the sword is 162mm, did you mean cm?
    "Ancora imparo - Michelangelo Buonarotti"

  9. #34
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    Hi Robert I must've copied that down wrong 162cm would make more sense, thanks i'll fix it in the thread. He was a big man for the time, if i remember right and most of the time i do, he was well over six feet.
    David Gray

  10. #35
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    I found the measurements of the Graham sword and they're here but i'll add them if i can to the post. 122cm for the blade, guard is 40.5 and the grip and pommel are 38cm. Thats interesting it already looks huge compaired to the Tyler but it turns out it's 22cm shorter than Wallace's sword.
    David Gray

  11. #36
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    David. Actually it is 2cm shorter than the Wallace sword.
    "Ancora imparo - Michelangelo Buonarotti"

  12. #37
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    I knew i should've paid more attention in math class, thats fine tho not only were these guys good friends and fighting comrades but they had almost matching swords.
    David Gray

  13. #38
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    Here is Sabre and scabbard presented to Rear Admiral Sir Frederick Maitland in 1805 by the Patriotic Fund at Lloyds for his attack on a fort and capture of ships in the bay of Muros on the NW coast of Spain. At the time the sword was valued at 100 pounds. Maitland was born in Fife Scotland. In 1815 Maitlands ship HMS Bellerophon was guarding the port of Rochefort and after Waterloo Napoleon chose to escape from France from Rochefort where he was taken on board the Bellerophon for a trip to England. Although Napoleon complained of his treatment while under the protection of the British he told Maitland " I feel your conduct to me throughout has been that of a gentleman and a man of honour." He presented this tumbler with the cypher of Empress Josephine to Maitland while on board in 1815.
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    David Gray

  14. #39
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    David. I can't imagine what the sword is worth today but I'll bet the tumbler is not far behind having belonged to Napoleon and Josephine. Wikipedia states that Napoleon stayed aboard the Bellerophon in Plymouth harbor and then was transferred to another ship for his exile to St. Helena. He never set foot in England.http://www.lloydsswords.com/
    Last edited by Rob E. Ozias; 04-28-2011 at 03:25 PM.
    "Ancora imparo - Michelangelo Buonarotti"

  15. #40
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    Sir Colin Campbell 1792-1863 Lord Clyde

    Another great Scottish soldier, born in Glasgow the son of a carpenter. Amongst other actions he saw the Chinese campaign 1842 and the Sikh War 1848-49. He led the Highland Brigade in the Crimea War 1854-55 taking victory at Alma and defending the port of Balaclava with "The Thin Red Line". He relieved Cawnpore and Lucknow during the India Mutiny and as Commander in chief in India he was responsible for suppressing the Sepoy Mutiny 1857-58. He gave away this sword to his friend Colonel Edmund Haythorne in 1863 the same year he passed away, he was laid to rest in Westminster Abbey.
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    David Gray

  16. #41
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    This silver-gilted sword and scabbard was presented to Lieutenant-Colonel James Stirling in 1809. The blade is inscribed "A Testimony of Esteem & Respect from the Non-Comd. Officers and Privates of the Royal Highlanders to Lieut. Co Jas. Stirling their Camdg Officer." Untill the 20c the treatment of soldiers owed much to the personal inclination of commanding officers. Stirling's strict but benevolent approach was indicated by his nickname in the regiment "Old Daddy".
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    David Gray

  17. #42
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    Going back to the James Morisset-made hilts, here's a unique view of the construction, in the Metropolitan collection. Sorry for the picture quality, I'm not a great photographer.
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  18. #43

    Veterans of Napoleonic wars photographed in 1860 with SWORDS of course.


  19. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by David gray View Post
    This is full name Captain, Lord, George William Hamilton Viscount Kirkwall. Photo taken in the Crimea in 1855 an officer of the 71st Highlanders with his pet dog and what looks like a Light Cavalry pattern sword.
    This sword is the HLI special pattern Field Officers sword, 28 (I think from memory) of which were purchased from Wilkinsons at the time of the Crimean War. I was able to identify this pattern for Harvey when he turned up an example.

    The swords date from 1854 and of the quantity ordered, the proof slips only list one name - an officer called Coburn. These swords, all 28, were to equip the 3 Field Officers, 8 Captains, 16 Subalterns and 1 Quarter Master on the strength.

    Proof slips states NEW REGULATION 71ST SWORD

    NOTE= Ignore previous rant-Ed has simplified the method of picture attachment!-Robert
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    Last edited by Robert Wilkinson-Latham; 05-13-2011 at 01:41 AM. Reason: additions

  20. #45
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    Hi Robert thanks very much for that info, can you tell me please what were these swords worth at that time? thanks. Dmitry! excellent uniforms and swords they must have been impressive to see in colour.
    David Gray

  21. #46
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    soldiers of the Crimea some with swords

    Yes i know they don't all have swords but when talking of the Crimea they can't just be left out. The first are the Black Watch. 2nd officers of the Watch 3rd Officers and men of the 4th dragoon guards. 4th Captain Cunninghame 42nd Reg. 5th privates of the 72 Reg of foot.
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    David Gray

  22. #47

    If we r talking Crimean War photos I have to add my fav.

    This guy is as photogenic as Hollywood actor. What a bad-ass, what a face.
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  23. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Wilkinson-Latham View Post
    This sword is the HLI special pattern Field Officers sword, 28 (I think from memory) of which were purchased from Wilkinsons at the time of the Crimean War. I was able to identify this pattern for Harvey when he turned up an example.

    The swords date from 1854 and of the quantity ordered, the proof slips only list one name - an officer called Coburn. These swords, all 28, were to equip the 3 Field Officers, 8 Captains, 16 Subalterns and 1 Quarter Master on the strength.

    Proof slips states NEW REGULATION 71ST SWORD

    NOTE= Ignore previous rant-Ed has simplified the method of picture attachment!-Robert
    David
    As far as I can find from invoices and the records. I have the following prices for 1859.
    Guards Swords were priced at £6-0-0
    Infantry Swords at £3-6-0

    Wish I could find them at these prices today!!!
    Regards
    Robert
    Last edited by Robert Wilkinson-Latham; 05-14-2011 at 04:14 AM.

  24. #49
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    ... you and me both, Robert.
    mark@swordforum.com

    ~ Hostem Hastarum Cuspidibus Salutemus ~

    "Those who beat their swords into plowshares usually end up plowing for those who don't."
    Benjamin Franklin

  25. #50
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    left to right:
    - U. Ito, oldest Son from Marquis Ito Hirobumi
    - Prince Karl Anton von Hohenzollern
    - Major Bronsart von Schellendorf (Adjutant from the Prince)
    - Major Nakayama
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    Last edited by Thomas Fritz Zehe; 05-14-2011 at 09:33 AM.
    I hope, you can read my English.
    I must use partially a translater .

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