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Thread: Some interesting old photos with swords

  1. #101
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    The Looking Glass 1825-6

    The Glasgow "Looking Glass" was published fortnightly. It was an illustrated broadsheet, the comments and style of drawing was lighthearted often comical and satirical. Number 2 has his grace the Duke of Wellington giving a commision on the spot to a ranker for gallantry. In #3 a soldier takes a French Eagle. #5 a recruiting sergeant persuades a farm worker that the army is the life for him.
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    David Gray

  2. #102
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    A painting by George Ogilvy Reid RSA 1851-1928, "On the Road to Derby-Sharpening swords"
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    David Gray

  3. #103
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    The 79th Highlanders , Ney York Vonunteers, 1857

    The NYH Guard was formed by NY citizens of Scottish decent. It's first Col was named Cameron who renamed the Reg in honour of the 79th Cameron Highlanders. They served with the Union army during the civil war and the Col was killed at the first battle of Bull Run in 1861, there is a sword there. Thats New York up there i just can't fix it.
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    Last edited by David gray; 09-06-2011 at 07:37 AM.
    David Gray

  4. #104
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    Capt. James Stair lindsay c1790, 73rd HLI, oil canvas.

    The Reg was raised in 1777 in response to the American war of independance, in 2006 they became 2nd battalion the Royal Regiment of Scotland, the Royal Highland Fusiliers (2SCOTS). Capt. Lindsay was mortally wounded, aged 25 on June 13 1783 at the battle of Cuddalore, Tamil Nada, India.
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    David Gray

  5. #105
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    The 8th Duke of Atholl, 1930

    He was one of the founding fathers of The National Trust for Scotland.
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    David Gray

  6. #106
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    The Duke of Atholl in 1860

    the only person to keep a private army, the Atholl Highlanders
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    David Gray

  7. #107
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    Armoury at Blair Castle

    Blair is the seat of the Duke's of Atholl and the 7th Duke put this together in 1877.
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    David Gray

  8. #108
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    Unknown US Military school

    I am thinking of starting a thread on US military schools swords. Here is a photo that be of interest. The swords these cadets are holding include M1860 Infantry offices and a reeded bone handled NCO sword.
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  9. #109
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    Hello T, that could definitly be interesting, this photo fits in well in this thread thanks for posting it. It would be interesting to see photos of dif uniforms from dif schools. Are there, or were there lots of military schools in the States? Seems like there should be, they're a war like bunch down there, no offence intended.
    David Gray

  10. #110
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    Sir Mungo Murray, 1680's

    Still on the Murray/Atholl story, lord Mungo was the 5th son of the Marquis of Atholl. Dressed for the hunt with belted plaid, fashionable doublet, flintlock sporting gun, two scroll-butt pistols in his belt, dirk and ribbon-basket sword. Painted in the early 1680's it hangs in the Tate Gallery next to the Irishman Sir Neil O'Neil. Mungo died young fighting to make a Scottish settlement in Panama.
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    David Gray

  11. #111
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    Robert Burns 1759-96

    Along with being Scotlands poet he was also a Gauger or Excise man and carried in his line of work a sword cane which he later gave to his friend John Richmond and a whinger or hanger which has a cast brass double shell guard and twisted ivory grip stained. He was appointed duties in customs and excise in 1789. He also carried a carbine but thats a thingie we don't talk about.
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    David Gray

  12. #112
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    sword and watch of Major General Sir John Campbell

    The man was shot dead whilst leading his men in a failed assault on the Redan fort at Savastopol in 1855 during the Crimean War. They were returned by the Russians under a flag of truce. The hilt is of the pattern introduced in 1822 for wear by officers of non-Highland infantry regiments. The watch is 18 carat gold.
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    David Gray

  13. #113
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    subject unknown

    He is a Lieutenant-Colonel though, in Trews with CB and painted around the 1860's.
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    David Gray

  14. #114
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    Interesting, a Toledo Factory marked blade (Fabca. de Toledo). Blue-and-gilt blades from Toledo were not very common, since this technique was not much in favour in Spain.

    Juan J.
    SI, SI
    NO, NON

  15. #115
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    Officer of the 74th Highlanders post 1834

    Later the 2nd Battalion Highland light infantry formed in 1777 by former Jacobite Lord MacLeod, son of the Earl of Comarty. Originally called Macleod's Highlanders and wore the Mackenzie tartan, the regiment became the Light Infantry in 1809 and in 1834 they were granted permission to wear tartan trousers and plaids.
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    David Gray

  16. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by Juan J. Perez View Post
    Interesting, a Toledo Factory marked blade (Fabca. de Toledo). Blue-and-gilt blades from Toledo were not very common, since this technique was not much in favour in Spain.

    Juan J.
    Hello Juan, was there any reason it wasn't in favour
    David Gray

  17. #117
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    A simple matter of fashion, I think. At the time a deeper acid etching was preferred. Only in late 19th cent. gilt appears in some Toledo works, along with the etching.
    SI, SI
    NO, NON

  18. #118

    Cuirassiers ?
    It is interesting to know who on the photo

  19. #119
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    Not cuirassier, but rather hussars who are carrying the m1822 Light Cavalry sabre with one suspension ring (so post-1892 or so . . . I can't recall the date of the change). They do not appear to be wearing typical French hussar uniforms of the period, so maybe Belgian?

  20. #120
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    Russian 14th cavalry div. c 1913

    This one thanks to C.Somerfield.
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    David Gray

  21. #121
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    Information on photo

    Quote Originally Posted by David gray View Post
    This one thanks to C.Somerfield.
    The group is from the 14th Cavalry Division, the two brigades of which were based at Kalisz and Chestochowa. Apart from their uniforms, the cossacks are noticeable for their shashka sabres (without hilts) and their apparently non-regulation hair lengths. It seem to have been Romanoff policy after 1910 to group cavalry regiments of the same number together, so these soldiers represent the 14th Host Ataman Yefremovs's Don Cossacks, the 14th HRH Prince Albert of Prussia's Mitau Hussars, the 14th HIH Grand Duchess Maria Aleksandrovna's Yamburg Lancers and the 14th Crown Prince of Germany and Prussia's Little Russia Dragoons. The latter have the braided fronts of a former cuirassier regiment. Amongst all these splendid titles is a solitary gunner of the 23rd Horse Artillery Battery.

  22. #122
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    Cossack

    From 1942 they say, and thats all i know about it.
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    David Gray

  23. #123
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    Hello David, Wikipedia has a list of hundreds of defunct US military academies. It was the ACW that made them popular. There are about 30 left and some are more "military" than others. They have lower enrollments but the same overheads. I went to Valley Forge Military Academy, suburban Philadelphia, in the mid 1960's. This was at the baby boomer peak. There were 1200 cadets and it was the largest private boys preparatory school/Junior Collage in the USA. Now they are happy to get 600. There are now female cadets in the Jr. Collage. I would have liked female cadets when I was there. I graduated four years behind in girls.
    VFMA has an exchange program with the Duke of York School.

    The photos are of private and public schools, all are unidentified. Some schools were less than a company in size. The more successful were at least a Battalion.
    No.1 dates 1905-10. The rifles are M1898. Swords are M1860.
    2 is a very small school. The muskets have wooden barrels. The faculty officer is wearing the US M1895 undress uniform.
    3 The uniforms are in the USMA style. I would date it in the 1870-90's. It may have been a public school military program. Swords are the M1860.
    4 is 1880-90's. note the frock coats on the officers and sack coats on the ranks. Swords are the M1860 type lacking the folding guard.
    5 Dates just before WWI. There is a faculty officer on each side, who are in M1912 pattern uniforms. The rifles are M1898.
    Tim Graham
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  24. #124
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    Another group of cadets

    These cadets are company officers and ncos posing with an interesting mix of swords. Front left is a M1850, middle is an Ames Sword Co. Mod 502 which is similar, and confused with, the M1860, right is ???. Does anyone have an Idea? Back left is First Sergeant carrying an M1850 and a trapdoor rifle. The middle sergeant is holding the flag as a prop and on the right is a corporal with his trapdoor.
    The front right sword could be a pre ACW militia officers sword.
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  25. #125
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    Edinburgh's Great Hall

    The Hall was built in 1513 for James 1V, converted to barracks in the 1650's, a hospital from 1800-1887 and then in 1890 and now it's used for weapon's display, swords a plenty. The stained glass windows are Victorian and the hammerbeam roof is by James Drummond.
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    David Gray

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