Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Wild hamon from james raw

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Durban, South Africa
    Posts
    110

    Wild hamon from james raw

    Hi Guys,
    James asked me to post these pics for comment. It is the first time he has achieved this amazing hamon and he would like comment from other professionals. Unfortunately I am not allowed to post in the professional forums where this article should be... if anyone can move it that would be great... Comments (Besides "I want one!")
    [/IMG]
    [/IMG]
    [/IMG]
    Last edited by Walt Williams; 08-30-2011 at 11:50 AM.
    Bill Williams

    "See, it is I who created the blacksmith who fans the coal into flame and forges a weapon fit for its work." - Isaiah 54v16

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    central New Mexico
    Posts
    3,250
    Alloy?
    Thomas Powers
    CoFounder of the Intergalactic Union of Bladesmiths
    "when you forge upon a star"---you better have your union card handy!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    11,760
    What did he do different form usual? it looks to my untrained eye that he retempered it?
    I like swords.

    ______________________________
    SCHOLA GLADIATORIA
    ______________________________

    If you want to climb a mountain, begin at the top.

    "Integrity, justice, courage, and action - without these, a person is of no consequence." - Don Nelson

    learn the way to preserve rather than destroy.
    avoid rather than check, check rather than hurt, hurt rather than maim, maim rather than kill.
    for all life is precious, not one can be replaced.

  4. #4
    I agree with Jeff that it looks retempered....
    "It is my feeling that to make a good sword, one must make a weapon first, and art second. But if it is really "right", it is both things at once, and in equal measure." -- Howard Clark

    "I cannot compensate for improper use of a sword. Nothing is bullet proof and idiots prove on a regular basis that nothing is idiot-proof -- they're just too creative." -- Keith Larman

  5. #5
    Wouldn't re tempering cause the edge to become more brittle? Just curious really...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Costa Mesa, CA
    Posts
    8,650
    You'd be surprised. I have yet to see pics, but I gave John Smith a Dynasty Forge unokubi tanto a bit ago. He was able to retemper the steel then requench it. From everything I've read and heard, quenching a blade a second time, with the thin edge and profile a finish sword has, will greatly increase the chances of cracking a blade. Regardless, it doesn't always happen with some smiths.

    Steel type matters too. I've seen double hamon like this on a lot of Kris Cutlery blades in 5160 steel. Usually 5160 steel is known for very weak, faint hamon patterns, but the hamon on some of the Bingo Hihara blades is very vibrant compared to other 5160 katana.

    Curious. It's fascinating the range of appearances in hardened steel.
    Every time I put on a suit for a wedding or other event, I feel like I'm wearing optimal clothing for an epic fight scene...

    Ronin Outpost

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    11,760
    http://www.ksky.ne.jp/~sumie99/utsuri.html

    It's utsuri, I forget about that sometimes.
    I like swords.

    ______________________________
    SCHOLA GLADIATORIA
    ______________________________

    If you want to climb a mountain, begin at the top.

    "Integrity, justice, courage, and action - without these, a person is of no consequence." - Don Nelson

    learn the way to preserve rather than destroy.
    avoid rather than check, check rather than hurt, hurt rather than maim, maim rather than kill.
    for all life is precious, not one can be replaced.

  8. #8
    What type of steel is it? This will help determine what is going on in Jame's blade. As I have had this happen before, mostly when I let the blade soak at a slightly higher temp. Since I judge by color and not by using a magnet, you get some different activity due to temps and steel alloying etc, ect. I have also seen my clay slightly pop up and the quenchant goes under a tiny bit and and I get that double line of sorts.

    Heck for we know this is what the steel wanted to do. As I am a firm believer that the steel will be. I call this Zen forging.


    John

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    11,760
    It almost looks like it's a wariha tetsu blade... Would that be possible? I'm with John, more info please?
    I like swords.

    ______________________________
    SCHOLA GLADIATORIA
    ______________________________

    If you want to climb a mountain, begin at the top.

    "Integrity, justice, courage, and action - without these, a person is of no consequence." - Don Nelson

    learn the way to preserve rather than destroy.
    avoid rather than check, check rather than hurt, hurt rather than maim, maim rather than kill.
    for all life is precious, not one can be replaced.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Out of my depths and out of my mind...
    Posts
    3,283
    Guys , I'm pretty sure this is EN45 ... as that is what James works with. As such you have the creeping hardness and all of that which comes with deep hardening steels, right?

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •