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Thread: My First Two Kats

  1. #1
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    My First Two Kats

    For no apparent reason I just wanted a Samauri sword. Did alot of research and wound up buying a solid beater upper to learn with and a really nice one for later. I bought a Hanwei Practical Elite and a Hanwei Bamboo Mat. You sure can tell the difference right away between a $165.00 sword and one that cost twice as much. Here's a few pictures of them side by side. Couldn't wait to go out back and tear up some soft targets. Here's a short kinda amusing video I made just before I walked out back and took my very first swing with a Katana. Enjoy my brothers

    http://i669.photobucket.com/albums/v...alElite103.jpg
    http://i669.photobucket.com/albums/v...alElite043.jpg
    http://i669.photobucket.com/albums/v...alElite030.jpg
    http://i669.photobucket.com/albums/v...alElite066.jpg
    http://i669.photobucket.com/albums/v...alElite073.jpg
    http://i669.photobucket.com/albums/v...alElite076.jpg
    http://i669.photobucket.com/albums/v...alElite119.jpg
    http://i669.photobucket.com/albums/v...alElite001.jpg
    Last edited by Mike T; 10-27-2011 at 05:32 PM. Reason: added pictures

  2. #2
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    Congratulations Mike!

    Both swords seem to be good first choices. The Bamboo Mat, albeit recent, has already made quite an impact in the sword collectors world. Funny video. Could use 80% more Bamboo Mat
    Oblivion is the shield of the mind

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angelo Silva View Post
    Congratulations Mike!

    Both swords seem to be good first choices. The Bamboo Mat, albeit recent, has already made quite an impact in the sword collectors world. Funny video. Could use 80% more Bamboo Mat
    Thanks. That Bamboo Mat is one beautiful piece of work ... cuts good too!

  4. #4
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    If you could make another fun video with some cutting, that would be awesome.
    Oblivion is the shield of the mind

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angelo Silva View Post
    If you could make another fun video with some cutting, that would be awesome.
    We'll see. Right now I'm mad at my katana. lol I was putting a fresh coating of "ren wax" on her and she bit me. ouch!
    Nothing too serious but it reminded me very quickly these suckers aren't toys.

  6. #6
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    You should try polishing then. They don't like it when you imply something is wrong with them and need to be fixed

    Seriously though, weapons ARE weapons. No matter how pretty they may be, beauty usually stems from how good things are at their purpose. This tends to be universally valid...
    Oblivion is the shield of the mind

  7. #7
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    Very prettily said Angelo.

    Form does follow function, when function becomes art it is truly beautiful

  8. #8
    Congrats on the fresh purchase The blade with the saka choji midare hamon actually looks very good (despite the etched hamon and really shiny Ji).

    ps. not a complaint but these swords should be displayed with the handle pointing to the left
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeffrey Ching View Post
    . not a complaint but these swords should be displayed with the handle pointing to the left
    Why is that? beyond 'tradition' that is, or rather, what is the idea or reason behind the tradition of putting the hilts/handles/tsuka to the left?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike T View Post
    We'll see. Right now I'm mad at my katana. lol I was putting a fresh coating of "ren wax" on her and she bit me. ouch!
    Nothing too serious but it reminded me very quickly these suckers aren't toys.
    There is a thread here some where that has a formula for Chuji oil. Basicly it is 10 mil-leter of clove oil to about 30 oz of light mineral oil. I buy the clove oil at GNC and the mineral oil at any drug store or pharmacy total cost about 12$
    cost of an oz of Chuji oil about 12$ I use it on all my blades no matter where they are from, antiques, modern ect.
    nothing wrong with renwax but tradition is nice and the chuji oil smells fantastic

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by David Lewis Smith View Post
    Why is that? beyond 'tradition' that is, or rather, what is the idea or reason behind the tradition of putting the hilts/handles/tsuka to the left?
    Beyond tradition, there is no idea or reason. Traditionally, the handle is placed to the left as having it facing the right is considered an act of agression towards any whom may be visiting your home.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by A. Timp View Post
    Beyond tradition, there is no idea or reason. Traditionally, the handle is placed to the left as having it facing the right is considered an act of agression towards any whom may be visiting your home.
    I'm left handed, so...?

    By the way Jeffrey, I think that is the Bamboo Mat.
    Oblivion is the shield of the mind

  13. #13
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    Hi Angelo, sure you already know this but strictly speaking in JSA there are no left handed swordsmen, very taboo. Cheers
    My guess is that you are reading this in English on a computer of some sort and if that is the case I hate to be the one to tell you but you will never be a samurai nor a ninja, any more than you may apply to become a 12th century French Knight or an Emporer of China. Some jobs are simply no longer hiring.

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    Quote Originally Posted by A. Lones View Post
    Hi Angelo, sure you already know this but strictly speaking in JSA there are no left handed swordsmen, very taboo. Cheers
    Oh, I'm quite aware of that... I wonder if I should put the handle towards the right? What is better, perceived thread or REAL threat...?
    Last edited by Angelo Silva; 10-31-2011 at 07:29 AM.
    Oblivion is the shield of the mind

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by A. Timp View Post
    Beyond tradition, there is no idea or reason. Traditionally, the handle is placed to the left as having it facing the right is considered an act of aggression towards any whom may be visiting your home.
    In this particular image, it's best not to let the weight of the sword bear down on the edge, as it can slowly deteriorate the inside of the wooden saya and potentially dull the blade. Resting the blades edge-up lets the edge 'float' inside the saya. And from an aesthetic point-of-view, with the sword edge-up, placing the tsuka to the left makes the kurigata on the saya visible. Not that its an important piece, but it does allow you to view the entire sword and its accessories at once.

  16. #16
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    Congrats. The bamboo mat is one beauty...

    The handle faced on the right because a maid took the katana and gave it to the samurai. This way it ended up right. Nowadays, that one get's it by himself the handle should be on the right in order to grasp the tsuka with his right hand. It's more of a matter of choice though...

    Just my 2 cents...
    Daring beyond power, risking against prudent advice and optimists in danger...
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian Pettett View Post
    In this particular image, it's best not to let the weight of the sword bear down on the edge, as it can slowly deteriorate the inside of the wooden saya and potentially dull the blade. Resting the blades edge-up lets the edge 'float' inside the saya. And from an aesthetic point-of-view, with the sword edge-up, placing the tsuka to the left makes the kurigata on the saya visible. Not that its an important piece, but it does allow you to view the entire sword and its accessories at once.
    Right-o. Also there can be certain other aesthetic considerations depending on which side is facing out when resting on a stand. Presence of 'emperor nodes' if you have a decent rayskin, the manner of tying off the tsuka-ito.. Probably quite a few more.

    That being said, I was taught to have the tsuka pointing to the right when the sword is resting on a rack. I don't think of it as "aggressive" so much as "ready". If I wanted to be aggressive, I would've cleared the koiguchi already! :P

  18. #18
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    Interesting. Those who specify right or left (not all do) invariably say tsuka to the left. At least with shinken or iaito. Bokken are the opposite, at least in my experience. In addition, keep in mind that Japanese ettiquette (especially concerning the sword), has different "layers" of meaning. Not only could it be considered aggressive, but also rude or in the case of a westerner, just plain ignorant.
    Of course if you're not concerned with tradition, as in the case of a left-handed swordsman, then practically speaking it makes no difference whatsoever.

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