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Thread: a few more seax

  1. #1

    a few more seax

    I seem to be addicted to making these.


    1095 blade with an 11 layer twisted spine, handle is masur birch. Just over 13 inches.


    Blade was forged from a very old leaf-spring which has a bit of natural banding, though i hesitate to call it shear steel. Handle is hard maple, overall length is 16 3/4 inches.


    Two very small seaxes, one has a 1095 blade with a wrought iron spine, and a masur birch handle. The other one has a 1095 blade with an English walnut handle. The sizes are 7 3/16 inches and 7 3/8 inches.


    Some more antique leaf-spring steel, with a deer bone handle. The blade is just under 5 inches long.


    1080 steel blade, English walnut handle, just over 8 inches overall.

    Thanks for looking.
    141. Not allowed to use a broadsword to disprove ‘The Pen is Mightier than the sword’.
    Some of my blades

  2. #2
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    Wow these are incredible! I really like the first two, the pattern welding and hamon on the first are very tastefully done. Some makers can tend to go overboard with over complex patterns but yours just looks right. The second seax has an incredible shape, really nice curves. Top notch work!

  3. #3
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    I think there are worse addictions to have. Those look real nice.
    "This was the age of heroes, some legendary, some historical . . . the misty borderland of history where fact and legend mingle."

    - R. Ewart Oakeshott

  4. #4
    Thanks guys. I've put off making any more until I get the sheaths figured out.... it is going better than expected... leatherwork is not one of my strengths.
    141. Not allowed to use a broadsword to disprove ‘The Pen is Mightier than the sword’.
    Some of my blades

  5. #5
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    After obtaining literally dozens of examples of his work, I know from personal experience how nice George's blades are. He is without a doubt one of the best kept secrets in the hand forged blade business.
    mark@swordforum.com

    ~ Hostem Hastarum Cuspidibus Salutemus ~

    "Those who beat their swords into plowshares usually end up plowing for those who don't."
    Benjamin Franklin

  6. #6
    :d

  7. #7
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    Most impressed!

    I particularly like the deer bone handle; and yes they deserve suitably magnificent sheaths!
    "Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, Merlot in one hand, Cigar in the other; body thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and screaming "WOO HOO, what a ride!"

  8. #8
    In between the endless bouts of rain here I've been studying and attempting to reproduce a fairly historically accurate sheath. I started with one of the smaller seaxes. I thoroughly cased the leather (soaked in warm water for about 5 minutes), then began forming the 'hump' and wet-shaping the leather to the knife. Once the leather was about half dry, I started the embossing process. I was not wanting to make an exact replica of any one particular piece so much as something in the style, so I borrowed decorative elements from several surviving sheaths and followed my gut... This part turned out better than I expected it to.

    99% of the original sheaths we have were found in dumps, so any metal fittings were stripped form them before they were thrown away. There are only one or two that still have any trace of the original metal fittings, plus there is the Aachen seax which likely does not have the original fittings... So I did my best guess at what the fittings may have looked like. I used copper this time, I think I will switch over to bronze sheet for future sheath fittings. I had a terrible time with the rivets, they fought me every step of the way. They may not be pretty, but they work... Again, I had to guess a bit on the suspension system...

    In the end, not bad for a first, I learned a lot about how not to do the next one...


    141. Not allowed to use a broadsword to disprove ‘The Pen is Mightier than the sword’.
    Some of my blades

  9. #9
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    nicely done, George!!
    mark@swordforum.com

    ~ Hostem Hastarum Cuspidibus Salutemus ~

    "Those who beat their swords into plowshares usually end up plowing for those who don't."
    Benjamin Franklin

  10. #10
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    Wow - Job done as they say! Fabulous work.
    "Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in an attractive and well preserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, Merlot in one hand, Cigar in the other; body thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and screaming "WOO HOO, what a ride!"

  11. One more little one with a 4" blade of W2 and a curly hard maple handle...
    141. Not allowed to use a broadsword to disprove ‘The Pen is Mightier than the sword’.
    Some of my blades

  12. #12
    A question for those that know more about seax than I do. Practically every museum blade I've seen lacks its original handle. Is there good reason to believe the grips were ultra long and straight like those on most modern replicas? It doesn't look like a very comfortable handle to me but I've never really used one.

  13. Quote Originally Posted by Steven Dick View Post
    A question for those that know more about seax than I do. Practically every museum blade I've seen lacks its original handle. Is there good reason to believe the grips were ultra long and straight like those on most modern replicas? It doesn't look like a very comfortable handle to me but I've never really used one.
    The only broken-back seax with an intact handle that I know of is the so-called "hunting knife of Charlemagne", or the Aachen seax. From memory, the handle is a bit over 8", made of horn with a silver ferrule type wrap.

    Also, period illustrations show straight, rather long handles.

    Last but not least, earlier styles of continental saxes (langsax, breitsax) had long handles. The only exception to this are the Nordic saxes, which had handles in the 4" to 5" range. The are many seax sheaths remaining even when the knife is long gone, and they also indicate long, straight handles.

    Honestly, evidence is scarce so I'm taking a bit of artistic licence when it comes to how long I make the handles, and the shape. If anything, I may not be making the handles long enough... The handle cross-section is also a guess. They start out almost circular at the butt and become a flattened egg shape as it approaches the blade. This is based off of much earlier narrow sax fittings. It makes for a very comfortable handle, feeling somewhere between a puukko and a wakisashi in the hand. With the long, lightweight handle, one can chop quite well by holding it near the end of the handle, better than one would think based only on the size of the blade. In some ways they are like a little axe or cleaver with a point...
    141. Not allowed to use a broadsword to disprove ‘The Pen is Mightier than the sword’.
    Some of my blades

  14. #14
    Very clean work, GH.

    Have you thought about making any Nordic style saxes? .......I really like these, with the long butcher-knife shaped blades....much more rounded in the tip.
    (A local Viking-age group insist only the broke-back style is a sax! But as we know, the broke-back style is much more Saxon/Anglo-Saxon and a bit later it seems)

    Again, very nice work.
    Ishould have a bash!
    (Been making a 'copy' of the Askeaton hilt...)

    Steve,
    Somewhere on this forum, there are a lot of photos of original saxes found with handles still in situ.
    Yes, nearly all very straight, but some nice decoration too!

    Richard.

  15. #15
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    I have two of George's seax's. One smaller and one on the large side. Both are excellent, and I've started using the smaller of the two as a daily knife, replacing my folder at least until temperatures approach shorts-weather. Blade is highly versatile and the handle shape/length is a nice change from what you typically find on a small fixed blade (or folder, for that matter). Plan to add it to the bushcraft kit for hikes and weekends in the woods.
    mark@swordforum.com

    ~ Hostem Hastarum Cuspidibus Salutemus ~

    "Those who beat their swords into plowshares usually end up plowing for those who don't."
    Benjamin Franklin

  16. Thanks Mark, glad you are enjoying those...

    Mr. Hare, I made 3 blades for a fellow in Sweden last year of what I'm calling Nordic long knives for lack of a better name... I'm not sure we can really call them seaxes, or sax, they are a different breed. Long, narrow, thick, and pointy, they reminded me a bit of bayonet blades. I've been studying the Nordic and Gotland style knives, and have had a few others express interest in them as well, so this will be my next project after I finish up a commission or two.
    141. Not allowed to use a broadsword to disprove ‘The Pen is Mightier than the sword’.
    Some of my blades

  17. A few more...
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    In hand... (blade is 17")
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    Briar handle...

    Some big ones...
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    More...

    Bone in sheath...
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    Blonde spearpoint, continental style...

    Laurel burl handle...


    Thanks for looking.
    141. Not allowed to use a broadsword to disprove ‘The Pen is Mightier than the sword’.
    Some of my blades

  18. A new one...


    8 3/4" blade, 16 1/8" overall, walnut handle.
    141. Not allowed to use a broadsword to disprove ‘The Pen is Mightier than the sword’.
    Some of my blades

  19. #19
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    very nice, indeed!
    mark@swordforum.com

    ~ Hostem Hastarum Cuspidibus Salutemus ~

    "Those who beat their swords into plowshares usually end up plowing for those who don't."
    Benjamin Franklin

  20. Instead of making a new thread I'll just keep adding to this one...

    Two more to show.
    First up, 1095 blade 7" long with a curly maple handle, 13" overall.... and a composite blade with a 1095 edge, 1084/15n20 twist, and wrought iron spine, 8" blade, brushed bog oak handle, 14" overall.

    141. Not allowed to use a broadsword to disprove ‘The Pen is Mightier than the sword’.
    Some of my blades

  21. After a long wait, the sheaths...




    Decided to go with 2 different patterns, both based on originals with ample amounts of speculation to boot.... bronze plate, brass rings, copper rivets.
    141. Not allowed to use a broadsword to disprove ‘The Pen is Mightier than the sword’.
    Some of my blades

  22. Not much to say about this one, 1095 edge, 1084/15n20 twists, wrought iron spine... blade is 10 1/4", just a hair over 19" overall. The spine is 3/8" thick at the hump... maple handle treated with aqua fortis.




    Thanks for looking.
    141. Not allowed to use a broadsword to disprove ‘The Pen is Mightier than the sword’.
    Some of my blades





  23. An almost matching set, bog oak handles with W2 and patternwelded blades, about 9 1/4" overall.
    141. Not allowed to use a broadsword to disprove ‘The Pen is Mightier than the sword’.
    Some of my blades





  24. Wrought iron spine, 11 layer 1084 and 15n20 twist, more wrought, W2 edge... the handle is walnut burl, and the overall length is just a hair over 16 1/2". It has an auto-hamon that just barely shows in the pictures.



    Based on this original:
    141. Not allowed to use a broadsword to disprove ‘The Pen is Mightier than the sword’.
    Some of my blades

  25. #25
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    Nicely done, George!
    mark@swordforum.com

    ~ Hostem Hastarum Cuspidibus Salutemus ~

    "Those who beat their swords into plowshares usually end up plowing for those who don't."
    Benjamin Franklin

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