Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Discriminating Genreals Russian dragoon sword better known as M1927 sashka

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada.
    Posts
    28

    Discriminating Genreals Russian dragoon sword better known as M1927 sashka

    Im wondering if anyone has any exerince with this sword its the same sword as advertized through Worldwide arms, im looking for a decent Sashka as I reenact a Cossack of WW2 and I need a good serviceable sword. whats the quality of this peice?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Nipmuc USA
    Posts
    11,857
    I am not sure by what you mean about a reproduction being serviceable for reenactment?

    If you are wondering about overall performance, run a search for Weapon Edge and there are multiple discussions on several forum venues. The company behind them and Discriminating General list the swords as appropriate for wear and show but not necessarily suited to some purposes. In general, most lack the finesse and blade dimensions/cross sections that make a big difference when comparing new to original. Visually, many of the reproductions are good enough for the role of public reenactment and overall display of arms. However, there was an occasion where one compared a different model sabre from India's shops that was favorably similar in overall dimensions. Still, the question is as to whether the expectation may lead to a let down in softness of temper and edge retention.


    FWIW, if you look at sites and groups that reenact the American Civil War, one of the guidelines is to concentrate more on clothing and other gear before buying a premium sword (in other words, get the cheapest sword that vaguely looks right).

    As to functional performance that will parallel original sabres, most companies have a long way to go to meet that level of goodness and most never will due to the cost of thicker stock to begin with. Some are getting better though and realizing the amount of concavity in the blade distal taper. Most are simply never going to approximate what the original sharps are ground like. I could generalize as to what I see in 18th to 20th century military swords but it doesn't mean much if those producing can't or will not understand the differences.

    Cheers

    Hotspur; mass distribution and the stock thicknesses seem to get left by the roadside in exchange for profit

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Metro D.C.
    Posts
    991
    Origional shashka are very light swords, quick and agile... on the other hand the Windlass, Military Heritage Weapon Edge or other Indian made ones miss this mark by quite a bit.
    "Please look in the encyclopedia and make a brief memorandum for me concerning the life of Correggio."
    Elbert Hubbard

    Nakamura Ryu Batto Do, Order of Seven Hearts

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Nipmuc USA
    Posts
    11,857
    Hi Christopher,

    Yes, weight is a lot of the overall difference with reproductions but even some grinding down Cold Steel 1796 sabres to make them "feel historic" still miss the mark. A friend hand ground down his Cold Steel and was greatly enjoying the difference until I saw him at a meet and put another period sword in his hand. His reaction was "**sus" and this is someone I have been meeting with for more than a decade playing "teach the public"

    For show and tell though, the Weapon Edge stuff does a credible job, if only at a distance. I was actually pleased at how well G.G.Godwin's eagle pommels come across in the History Channel War Of 1812 special. I can't say any of the weapons they used in those reenactments looked "bad" and the clothing/uniforms looked very good.

    For performance, I have to say I will rarely go back to reproductions and that even for cutting. The period mounted artillery sword I brought that day was cutting on a par with the "tuned" Cold Steel and I hadn't even spent a lot of time making it as sharp as the new toys. The speed made up for the difference in sharpness, even though several ounces lighter and with less blade forward presence.

    A typical difference is the production swords rarely 10mm or more thick at the guard, right off the bat

    Cheers

    Hotspur; I have to say though that there are some real slugs in the historic sword dept as well
    Last edited by Glen C.; 05-01-2012 at 06:16 PM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada.
    Posts
    28
    well I guess scrap the idea of buying one I'll have to make one to suit me, I Try to build a few a year anyways, (swords that is) I'll try to get some pics of my Kinjal posted when im done building it and have to do some hunting for a suitable piece of steel to make my sashka out of, hard to find steel thats good around here.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Metro D.C.
    Posts
    991
    I don't know what the deal is with the Russian antique market these days. Even mediocre shashka are priced over $1k which makes no sense. I picked one up in Afghanistan that is pre WWI with Tula marks for less than a tenth of that. When I was in the Czech Republic in 2006 I saw several that were no where near that expensive. There were also lots of Uzbeck shashka over in Afghanistan that were very cheap... Maybe you can find someone in the military in Afghanistan that will mail you one.
    "Please look in the encyclopedia and make a brief memorandum for me concerning the life of Correggio."
    Elbert Hubbard

    Nakamura Ryu Batto Do, Order of Seven Hearts

  7. #7
    If I am not mistaken, Kult of Athena actually have a couple of Hanwei Shaska prototype for sale. I have no idea how different they are from the original Shaska, but I think someone from SBG forum might have bought some and commend on it.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Nova Scotia, Canada.
    Posts
    28
    I hear the Hanwei shashka is an awsome handling peice of work ...I looked it up its very well done as are most Hanwei swords.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Metro D.C.
    Posts
    991
    Very interesting
    "Please look in the encyclopedia and make a brief memorandum for me concerning the life of Correggio."
    Elbert Hubbard

    Nakamura Ryu Batto Do, Order of Seven Hearts

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •