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Thread: 1897 pattern help please.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
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    5

    1897 pattern help please.

    Hi,
    This is my first foray into swords. I couldn't help but buy this one and could do with help. From spending a few hours research would I be right in thinking that this is a British infantry warrant officers sword?. It has The VR on the guard. There is no decorative etching on the blade only the marks that I have photographed here. Also as shown it is marked roughly QMA 31 would I be right that this was a Quartermasters sword?. It has its field scabbard but might it never have actually been used as the Quartermaster never commanded troops?? Could someone help with a value(forgive me if that is a wrong question on this forum)

    Any help greatly appreciated.
    GregB
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  2. #2
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    Jul 2013
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    Hi Forget valuing please, just picked up on the rules.
    Thanks
    Greg.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Guildford, Surrey, England.
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    Hi Greg, yes it is an 1897 pattern NCO's sword. It appears to have been first proved in July 1901 ( 7 '01), so one of the last swords to have VR rather than ERvii.
    I don't know what QMA stands for, but my assumption is that it is a regimental assignment. Queen's Something Something?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Michigan, USA
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    913
    Greg. The BR with a crown above it indicates it was sent to Birmingham Repair in '04 and the number 26 is the inspector's number.
    "Ancora imparo - Michelangelo Buonarotti"

  5. #5
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    Jul 2013
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    Thank you very much for the info so far. Is having a repair a bad thing?

    Greg.

  6. #6
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    Feb 2002
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    No... in a way it's a good thing, because it shows that the sword was still in use and intended to stay in use in 1904. So you know it was retained in the Army for a few years at least. The repair could have been anything, from a repolish, to fixing a bent guard (common), or a damaged scabbard (also common).

  7. #7
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    Jul 2013
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    Thanks Matt. I was worried that it might affect the value as I paid £300.00 for it but it sounds like it might have increased its worth rather than decreased it lol. I would really like to find out what the Q.M.A stands for. I have searched google starting with 'Queens' as the first word but to no avail although the Quartermaster thing keeps popping back up. If I am right these swords were given to warrant officers who had been promoted by warrant and quartermaster was a warrant officer. I may be going completely down the wrong road though.
    Greg.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    5
    Hi,
    Just for info I have found out what the initials Q.M.A stand for. They stand for Quarter Master Adjutant, so the likelihood is that this was maybe a Captains or Leftenant's sword but under the rank of Major.

    Greg.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Guildford, Surrey, England.
    Posts
    13,936
    Hmm, as far as I can see, the rank you refer to was generally 'Adjutant & Quartermaster', which would not give QMA, I think. Apart from that I find it quite unlikely that an officer would be carrying a Sergeant's sword, though nothing is impossible (for example if his sword was lost or damaged, forcing him to take a sword from stores).

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