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Thread: Chinese Tiger Spear?

  1. #1

    Chinese Tiger Spear?

    Some unusual edged weapons came my way this past week. Among them was this trident spear that I've been told is a Chinese Tiger Spear or Fork. The total length is approx. 39"/99cm , width from left to right tine approx. 21"/53cm length of the central spear approx. 15"/38cm. There's a diamond shaped retainer piece made from brass or bronze that's been forced down the central spear to its base that locks down the crossbar. Can anyone tell me anything about this weapon? Here are some pics.

    Thanks,
    Len
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  2. #2
    Join Date
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    I've never seen one with a washer like this as a retainer; old ones I've seen are either forge-welded, riveted, or sometimes probably heat-shrunk on (heat up the piece with the outer tines, slip over teh central tine, and as it cools, it shrinks and grips tightly). The outer tines are often flatter and more bladelike, which square or fat-diamond section is common for the central tine.

    Traditional kungfu weapon, associated with southern styles. They still make these, so there are modern ones around. Also supposedly used for tiger hunting. Used in the 19th century as a militia weapon, and was a mainstream military weapon at times, e.g., late Ming, where they were often used in the mandarin duck formation, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ji_Xiao_Xin_Shu
    "In addition to being efficient, all pole arms were quite nice to look at." - Cherney Berg, A hideous history of weapons, Collier 1963.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Timo Nieminen View Post
    I've never seen one with a washer like this as a retainer; old ones I've seen are either forge-welded, riveted, or sometimes probably heat-shrunk on (heat up the piece with the outer tines, slip over teh central tine, and as it cools, it shrinks and grips tightly). The outer tines are often flatter and more bladelike, which square or fat-diamond section is common for the central tine.

    Traditional kungfu weapon, associated with southern styles. They still make these, so there are modern ones around. Also supposedly used for tiger hunting. Used in the 19th century as a militia weapon, and was a mainstream military weapon at times, e.g., late Ming, where they were often used in the mandarin duck formation, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ji_Xiao_Xin_Shu
    I agree with this analysis. In addition, the patina is rather too even for an antique.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
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    618
    I recently saw a photo of another example with such a retaining washer. No date given.
    "In addition to being efficient, all pole arms were quite nice to look at." - Cherney Berg, A hideous history of weapons, Collier 1963.

  5. #5
    The sleeve of the fork seems to be the copy (?) of real specimens. E.g. fin attached the spearhead with the same work on the sleeve (this one is in private collection but I saw several pieces of this kind in the Artillery Museum in SPb, Russia - they were captured in 1900 during the Boxer rebellion):
    Name:  spear.jpg
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