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Thread: Loyal Battalion Kris

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Rugby, UK
    Posts
    537

    Loyal Battalion Kris

    Not sure if I should post this here or in the Antique and Military Forum. I decided on here as I know little about these blades and would welcome some well informed feedback from experts. I just picked this up at auction:

    Catalogue description:
    Malaya Presentation Kris to 1st Batt Loyal Regiment, heavy Damascus wavy edge blade. Silver grip ferrule.Carved wooden stylised bird head grip. Contained in its wooden scabbard with large throat. Plated rectangular panel engraved 'Presented to 1st Battalion The Loyal Regiment by the Prime Minister and The Government of the Federation of Malaya on completion of the Battalions Tour of Duty in the Federation 10th December 1959'


    The Loyal Regiment were the Loyal Regiment (North Lancashire) also known as The Loyal North Lancashire Regiment. They began a three year deployment to Malaya in 1957.

    Stats:

    Weight, sword: 10oz (0.27kg), with scabbard: 1lb 2 oz (0.5kg)
    Length overall:18'' (46cm) Blade: 14.5''(37cm)
    POB: 3'' (7.5cm)
    Distal taper 0.33'' (8.4mm) at ricasso, 0.2'' (5.1mm)at mid blade, 0.12''(3.2mm) 2 inches from tip.


    The Damascus (pattern welded) blade is very textured and feels more like sawn wood than metal. Are all Kris blades like this? Are etching acids used to get the texture?
    Attached Images Attached Images      
    The journey not the destination

  2. #2
    Hi Guy,

    It's quite the subject for research.
    Keris (Kris) are enormously interesting and varied.
    The pattern welding on these is known as 'pamor'.
    They are etched and stained with acids and arsenic.
    Most pamor have a special significance and name.
    http://kerispan.blogspot.co.uk/2007/...motifs-on.html

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Guy C View Post
    The Damascus (pattern welded) blade is very textured and feels more like sawn wood than metal. Are all Kris blades like this? Are etching acids used to get the texture?
    A fascinating piece of history!
    Keris in many areas of Indonesia are "washed" regularly with fruit acids and then treated with arsenic and lime juice (called warangan in Java). This causes the textured effect. But not all blades will be textured like this. In Bali they also polish the blades to keep a smooth surface.

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