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Thread: 2 Moro Kris for comment

  1. #1

    2 Moro Kris for comment

    I bought myself a early birthday present, thought Id share with the class. The new addition is the kris with two stirrup. Ive had the single stirrup one for a few months now. I know absolutely nothing about them. The blade on the single stirrup kris is defiantly older and a bit heavier, while the two stirrup is lighter and feels more balanced but isn't super old. Im guessing both sheathes are newer also. Ive always wanted one but could never convince myself to pay the 200.00 these type seemed to go for, that was before I ever had one in hand. For some reason the I always kept picturing them just slightly bigger then the average keris. I picked up each for less then it cost me to fill my gas tank twice so I had no choice but to buy them. They both measure in at around 27 1/2 inches and neither have separate gangya. Added the 4 inch 357 mag to help others that have never held one of these swords in hand properly judge just how beefy these things are.
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
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    618
    I could never bring myself to really like these chunky ones (like your 1-stirrup). Older lighter ones usually feel wonderful in hand, and blow them out of the water in comparison.

    Most of mine (and a giant keris) in the photo. Weights are, left to right, 593g (very light and agile), 713g, 644g (perhaps my favourite), 866g (chunky and clunky), 695g, 448g (tourist).

    I did manage to get one since the photo with bad ergonomics - some collector glued the grip on the wrong way around (as they do), and it just feels wrong.
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    "In addition to being efficient, all pole arms were quite nice to look at." - Cherney Berg, A hideous history of weapons, Collier 1963.

  3. #3
    Wow thoes are some really nice blades! Hopefully someday Ill be able to afford some nicer examples like yours. I really just lucked out on both of these with the price as they were both sold on ebay when the seller didnt know what they were. I always try to message the seller when they dont know what they have just to give them a bit more info so more collectors can find them and the sellers can get a more fair price for the item but sometimes they still dont change the description. That way I dont feel bad when I save a few hundread bucks.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Posts
    618
    Not a kris expert, or even close to it, but I'd guess yours to be early to mid 20th century. Laminated blades? Looks like welded edges on the single-stirrup one, and the photo of one side of the two-stirrup shows a pattern. How heavy are they?
    "In addition to being efficient, all pole arms were quite nice to look at." - Cherney Berg, A hideous history of weapons, Collier 1963.

  5. #5
    My best guess is also early to mid 20th. The seller I bought the single stirrup kris from said the blade was very late 19th, the blade does seem to be older. I would guess the 2 stirrup would be late 20s to the 50s. Thats just my guess from what Ive seen. Both blades are laminated. The pattern you mentioned is some sort of etching. Its present on both the blades with that side being the most defined. There is a darkish stain to both blades which I am guessing is left from whatever they were etched with. The stain is the same tone you would see when using some sort of citrus soak for rust removal. I dont have a way to weigh them currently. I cant see any welding on them. I think thats just some gunk build up or maybe whatever glue they used.
    Last edited by Jared L.; 01-23-2015 at 02:31 AM.

  6. #6
    So here are some more close ups from the two stirrup kris. It looks like someone tried to use steel wool to get rid of the dark tone on one whole side of the blade.
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  7. #7
    And here are some of the single stirrup kris. The etching is not as heavily done on this one but some can still be seen. Also the top part of the handle has me a bit confused. The far end is clearly carved wood, while the top piece closest to the blade is some sort of bone?
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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Posts
    618
    Welded-edge is just a lamination style, where high-carbon steel edges are welded onto a (usually lower-carbon, softer) body. The body can be laminated/pattern-welded, or it can be a simple single piece of steel or iron.

    It looks similar to sanmei/sanmai ("three plate") where soft (often pattern-welded) sides are welded onto a central high-carbon sheet. AFAIK, Moro blades are more likely to be welded-edge than sanmei, judging by blades that are cracked or suffering some delamination. But I've seen people say that sanmei is common.

    I don't know how the hilts are usually put together. Having separate pommel and grip is done (even when both are wood), so bone grip and wooden pommel doesn't seem strange.
    Last edited by Timo Nieminen; 01-23-2015 at 05:20 PM.
    "In addition to being efficient, all pole arms were quite nice to look at." - Cherney Berg, A hideous history of weapons, Collier 1963.

  9. #9
    Well you learn something new everyday Im currently doing my welding certification so after 8 hours a day of thinking welding I just automaticaly started looking for weld spots on the blade near the hilt the word "edge" just went un noticed lol

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