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Thread: Lion Head Double fuller

  1. #1
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    Lion Head Double fuller

    This is another sword won in auction that was part of a group. I did not get a photo before I started but did get one shortly after first round of cleaning. Then more photos after a couple more cleanings. Couple more later. The last close to complete but a little more to go. The lion head hilt is substantial in size. Blade is double fullered and I do not have measurements with me. The wooden grip is 50% gone underneath wire wrap. Can some one identify it?
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    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

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    massive lion head

    Few more photos.
    Attached Images Attached Images     
    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  3. #3
    My best guess would be French, late 1700s-early 1800s. The blade appears to be fullered in Montmorency style, and I've seen a similar lionhead on French infantry sabers, although the ones I've seen has slotted guards. There may be one of these shown in Neumann's "Swords and Blades of the American Revolution".

    Hope this helps! -- ElJay

  4. #4
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    The blade is very similar to s44 in style but called a spanish blade?. The pommel is different with more detail. The kguard a stirrup with knob or acorn very 1780 to 1805ish like the german state guards. Eric
    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  5. #5
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    Good morning,
    I would go for French design, Solingen made, light cavalry officer model, Revolution era.
    Best,
    Dan

  6. #6
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    Well Gentleman I guess I had later in my head and drew a blank on the whole thing. Solingen made would explain different aspects of it for sure, they were the masters of and used any countries design. The etching on the ricasso seems to be a Solingen effort albeit the flowery etching on blade seems frenchy. The grip and kguard reminds me of the late 18th german state swords. I never thought Revolutionary War era. I do have something to start with and if I can figure out a way to fill behind wire wrap on grip without removing any thing to keep it from being damaged I will be as they say-in tall cotton. Officer model? British officer or Rebel? In better shape it would have been a prize for this enlisted sword guy. I do not own a lot of beauties. Thanks Dan and LJ I could not enjoy my retirement interest without the assistance of gentlemen as yourself on this forum.
    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  7. #7
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    I agree it looks Solingen made. French virtually had no cavalry swords with lion heads. Blade appears shorter than cavalry and more likely infantry.
    Nothing in Michel Petards French cavalry books that looks even close to it. Unfortunately I do not have his infantry sword books.

    How did you remove the corrosion on the blade?

  8. #8
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    Good afternoon Eric,
    Thanks for the nice words and welcome in the retired gang.
    Nice project....a good oiling of the leather plus careful tightening of the wire and for the rest, elbow grease.
    Should be nice to see the finished sword.
    Best,
    Dan

  9. #9
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    Hi Will,
    You shimed in at the same time I was writing.
    Nothing in Petard (the 3 tomes) or Lhoste and Resek.
    Being not a regulatiion model, private purchase by an officer.

  10. #10
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    Thanks Dan, add me to the retired gang! It does free up time to do more important things such as collect swords.
    To find a neglected sword and be able to see what it could look like after preservation it part of the fun.

  11. #11
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    That will be registered Sir....
    I'm still trying to figure out where the hell I did found time to work.....

  12. #12
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    The wood under the wire on the grip is 50% gone. If you grip the handle the wire sinks in a long way. My fear is someone as in one of my boys or their friends will in their zeal bend the wire as it looks fully intact now. I really hate cutting a tang. I have repaired quite a few that have been cut or hammered when I bought them but the untouched tang is a thing of beauty. Sometimes I regrip in pieces to avoid cutting one on a gripless sword. The wire grip on this one is very much worth saving and there was lots of gold floating in a sea of rust on the blade. The glit on the hilt is intact although bluing is a bust. It is a very different animal to most other swords I own. I thought perhaps the French did not use the lions head but was unsure. If infact Revolutionary War era, in the states and extremely rusty as it was it is very likely a US used weapon. I would not see the point in someone bringing an item in its condition across the water. It is truly amazing the difference in quality in different swords even very early as compared to Civil War. The time frame had nothing to do with it. Eric
    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  13. #13
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    Your description of the grip suggests dry rot. Either don't handle the sword by the grip or replace the grip.
    The wire would be brittle (seen its share of water to corrode it) and break easily if pulled to tighten etc.
    If you decide to repair the sword try looking here at Tom Nardi: http://swordrestorationtn.com/ he supplies grips, wire etc.

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