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Thread: WYATT, Philadelphia maker? Looking for info

  1. #101
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    Glen I took your good advice and emailed Dick Bezdek and I'm looking forward to a reply.

  2. #102
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    Casting iron is by far the easiest over steel and for sure brass but to get set up to cast is a different story. Anyone can make a small brass kiln and start casting. To build a kiln and set up to heat your molds for steel or iron is a way bigger deal. I often hear people say southern hilts are rough because they are sand cast and wonder what they think the yankees were using for molds. Ram sand or lost wax its still basically quartz sand and bentonite. Iron and steel is more forgiving when you pour in your mold but brass is way easier to set up and get done. The reason southern hilts are rough is because they used scraped parts instead of mixing pure billets of metal with exact mixture of copper and zinc. I would imagine sheet steel was hard to come by pre 1812. It would be easier to work and more forgiving than trying to shape brass. But any back yard blacksmith could have cast a brass hilt. Eric
    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  3. #103
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    An inquiry to David R. Hillier Antique Associates at West Townsend, Inc. has supplied me important information regarding the Wyatt name.

    "Joseph Wyatt
    Son of William Wyatt of Rotherhithe Wall in the County of Surrey miller, apprenticed to William Suddell of Pelican Court Little Britain as silversmith 8 April 1778. Free, 4 May 1785. Mark entered as small worker, 1 October 1789. Address: 12 Angel Street, St. Martin's Le Grand. Heal records him as goldsmith, Angel Street, 1790.

    Likely not American although Wyatt was a common surname which showed up in America"

    David also states he has not recently had this maker.


    Any further thoughts appreciated
    Last edited by Will Mathieson; 03-09-2017 at 08:57 AM.

  4. #104
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glen C. View Post
    Joseph Wyatt


    Son of William Wyatt of Rotherhithe Wall in the County of Surrey miller, apprenticed to William Suddell of Pelican Court Little Britain as silversmith 8 April 1778. Free, 4 May 1785. Mark entered as small worker, 1 October 1789. Address: 12 Angel Street, St. Martin's Le Grand. Heal records him as goldsmith, Angel Street, 1790.

    http://www.koopmanrareart.com/Deskto...artistid=23944

    Philadelphia/ American silversmiths
    https://books.google.com/books?id=70...rsmith&f=false

    From Archive .org
    http://archive.org/stream/makersofea...0ensk_djvu.txt

    I am seeing reference for London past 1800

    Bi-oceanic? Coincidence? Or brokered in America as imports? Another generation?
    That from the first page of the thread

    What was Dick Bezdek's reply? Curious minds and all that.
    Cheers

    GC

  5. #105
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glen C. View Post
    That from the first page of the thread

    What was Dick Bezdek's reply? Curious minds and all that.
    Cheers

    GC
    Thanks Glen for reminding me of that, I had totally forgotten, here it is: it is a federal period cavalry officers sword. joseph wyatt was a philadelphia silversmith in business 1791 to 1798 wyatt like other early silversmiths such as william ball jr. and paul revere mounted swords. they bought blades locally or from solingen, germany and sheaths from local leather fabricators,made the hilts and assembled them. the hilt design and blade length and clipped point indicate your sword is for the cavalry. the fact that your sheath is missing the tip and frog stud(on mouthpeice}

    I could not find any more on Wyatt of Philly and with the sword looking quite British thought I'd keep looking to support or otherwise discount this Wyatt. I believe the sword is earlier than the 1791-98 date. I could be wrong, wouldn't be the first time.

    I'll look at those links you posted now.
    Last edited by Will Mathieson; 03-09-2017 at 11:44 AM.

  6. #106
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    Possibly I have already had the correct answer from Bezdek and this British Wyatt is not him? I don't usually delve into swords of this earlier time period or connections to the United States.
    With the info I do have not yet compiled properly lends to one forgetting a point or two.

  7. #107
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    A terrific sword, with any explanation. Well worth another look.

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