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Thread: Best Cutting Katana under $1000

  1. #1

    Best Cutting Katana under $1000

    Fot the man who has no experience of cutting.

  2. #2
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    Re: Best Cutting Katana under $1000

    Originally posted by LaoZhang
    Fot the man who has no experience of cutting.
    Go for a coldsteel katana on Ebay, they are good cutters, can withstand lot of abuse and won't bend on a bad cut.

    Sturdy traditional fittings, good 1050 steel blade, warrior series and imperial series differ only for the level of polish.

    GREAT price/quality ratio

  3. #3

    Re: Best Cutting Katana under $1000

    Originally posted by LaoZhang
    Fot the man who has no experience of cutting.
    First find a teacher and ask him....

  4. #4
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    Find a teacher? Teachers are knowledgeable, but unfortunately in JSA they tend to be very traditional and train what they are taught. I am sure my opinion is not going to go over well but this is from my experience. For example I was told that you couldn't do tameshagiri with a European sword (or at least that they would not cut as good as a katana). We all know that to be false, heck on Albion's site they even cut with the Atlantean. Please don't get me wrong, I have had tremendous respect for all of my instructors and the knowledge they had to pass on to me. I mean no disrespect, but you do not need to be a teacher to know what cuts good.

    From what I have heard, the Bugei swords do quite well.
    "Life Is Short And Hard Like A Body Building Elf"

  5. #5
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    I was able to buy a Criswell before leaving, and it cuts tatami like butter. It just keeps going and going and going. Its got the G-10 scabbard, but I will change that with time. A great price for $475. If you want the full traditional dressing, depending on heavy or light soft targets, my PPK and Bushido hold up great. Just got the Bushido, and thinking of sending down to Lohmans in the States to get a new scabbard done on it. Im not too much for brown.

    But form is everything in cutting. If you suck, your sword can only do so much, and you'' wind up bending it or something. Be careful and find a teacher.

    Marina

  6. #6
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    Originally posted by Warren Gant
    Find a teacher? Teachers are knowledgeable, but unfortunately in JSA they tend to be very traditional and train what they are taught. I am sure my opinion is not going to go over well but this is from my experience. For example I was told that you couldn't do tameshagiri with a European sword (or at least that they would not cut as good as a katana). We all know that to be false, heck on Albion's site they even cut with the Atlantean. Please don't get me wrong, I have had tremendous respect for all of my instructors and the knowledge they had to pass on to me. I mean no disrespect, but you do not need to be a teacher to know what cuts good.

    From what I have heard, the Bugei swords do quite well.
    I dont know about "not going over well" but the whole idea of being a teacher in JSA or indeed in any MA is to pass on the teachings of the school - different schools have different emphasis and place a higher premium on learning particular techniques as illustrative of the principles of their art but ultimately we are talking about different routes to similar destinations.

    As far as katana-snobbishness goes I think that we are thankfully entering an era for swordsmanship in general where practitioners of arts involving different types of blade can both appreciate the others arts and respect the qualities of their tools. That isnt to say that you'll find koryu masters "seeing the light" and swapping their katana for blades out of Oakeshott but the person who believes that a well-made sword of any design in the hands of a person trained to use it is anything other than an extremely deadly and effective weapon is living in a dreamworld and the vast majority of swordsmen I've met do seem to have a firm grasp of the realities.

    For my part I'm just starting the process of learning to teach this stuff but if you ever catch me spouting such idiocy as to suggest that a western blade is somehow inferior to a katana by definition, then I promise you I'll stand still whilst you apply a boot to my rear for talking such rubbish....
    Asps. Very dangerous. You go first.

  7. #7
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    Exclamation

    You got a point on snobbishness, but the point is that katanas or Atrim swords or what not are extremely sharp and a total newcomer to swords attempting to cut can injure himself/herself or a bystander very easily.

    We must realize that these are LIVE weapons and any accidental injury can kill or disfigure permanently, hence it is a huge responsibility.

    Yes, many immediately go off on this "seek your sensei first" and it sounds like the same regurgitated rhetoric, but it's absolutely true: SAFETY FIRST.

    I would add by saying "SAFETY and RESPONSIBILITY FIRST."
    Adrian
    Maestro of the Bolognese School (Spaghetti sauce, not fencing!)

    Click HERE for the SFI comic strip "Bloodgroove"!

  8. #8
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    Originally posted by Adrian Ko
    You got a point on snobbishness, but the point is that katanas or Atrim swords or what not are extremely sharp and a total newcomer to swords attempting to cut can injure himself/herself or a bystander very easily.

    We must realize that these are LIVE weapons and any accidental injury can kill or disfigure permanently, hence it is a huge responsibility.

    Yes, many immediately go off on this "seek your sensei first" and it sounds like the same regurgitated rhetoric, but it's absolutely true: SAFETY FIRST.

    I would add by saying "SAFETY and RESPONSIBILITY FIRST."
    I couldnt agree more. Everybody who's read some of my ramblings on here knows my opinion of the value of training, the point I was trying to make is that in the post I responded to the dedication of teachers to passing along the principles of their school was somehow portrayed as a negative and as being linked to perpetuating the katana myths we all have learned to hate on SFI. It seems to me that the reality is a little different and that passing on the traditions is what teachers are supposed to do - it doesnt (or at least, shouldnt) prevent them being open to insights into other schools or systems even though their own traditions preclude incorporating them into their teaching because of the risk of perturbing the pattern of the teaching upon which a student depends and which is fundamental to the nature of any martial art school.
    Asps. Very dangerous. You go first.

  9. #9
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    Originally posted by Adrian Ko
    You got a point on snobbishness, but the point is that katanas or Atrim swords or what not are extremely sharp and a total newcomer to swords attempting to cut can injure himself/herself or a bystander very easily.

    We must realize that these are LIVE weapons and any accidental injury can kill or disfigure permanently, hence it is a huge responsibility.

    Yes, many immediately go off on this "seek your sensei first" and it sounds like the same regurgitated rhetoric, but it's absolutely true: SAFETY FIRST.

    I would add by saying "SAFETY and RESPONSIBILITY FIRST."
    I think Adrian and Dave both are hitting the nail on the head, but I would like to expand on this a bit. I mentioned this in another thread and I think it bears repeating:

    The purpose - in my opinion - in seeking out a sword instructor is not - in my opinion - to be a mindless sponge to unquestioningly soak up the sensei's every utterance as if it were divinely inspired, and to accept that master's teachings as if that were the only way to approach the philosophy and technique of that art's or form's swordsmanship.

    The purpose in seeking out a sensei, or what ever the equivalent teacher is for the given art, is to learn safety and respect both for the weapon and for the enormous responsibility that comes with even laying hands on the weapon.

    One of my hobbies is firearms and I desperately want new members to join the firearms community, but I want them in there safely. The first thing I tell any new enthusiast to firearms to do is to locate a qualified firearms instructor. Doesn't matter if the instructor is teaching skeet shooting, long range bullseye, recreational shooting, practical competition, Cowboy Action, or even personal defense. The same safety fundamentals exist in all of these firearm arts.

    Swordsmanship would/should also have a fundamental set of safety concepts, regardless of the art or form.

    To extend the firearms analogy a bit - a lot of people think firearm safety is essentially "don't shoot anyone". Well, that is the destination -- there are specific mechanical tasks that define the journey, which is in many ways more important, because many of these tasks are not obvious to the neophyte.

    It's easy to encompass sword safety -- Don't cut no one.

    Again, that is the destination, not the journey. And it is the sword master who has the experience to know, and to pass on, those specific less-than-obvious tasks to the student.

    I'm looking for a new job, maybe closer to home, and maybe, just maybe (fingers crossed) I can get back into Japanese sword martial arts now that I have the money to enjoy it with less worry. I know there are many JSA places here in southern California, but if there weren't any, I'd be looking for SCA and ARMA and Tai Chi or anything else sword-related for that initial grounding in safety and respect for the weapon.

    Don
    "People sleep peaceably in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence in their behalf."

    An unknown, but very astute person

  10. #10
    I'm a huge fan of the Tori Elite by Hanwei. Very durable and will run you ~$400
    Katana Reviews - Quality in our weapons leads to quality in our art.

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Nate_Owen View Post
    I'm a huge fan of the Tori Elite by Hanwei. Very durable and will run you ~$400
    Where can you get a Tori Elite for $400?

  12. #12
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    Not to mention that I'm sure the original poster has managed to get a sword in the 12 years since he asked that question.
    Paul Smith
    "Keep the sharp side and the
    pointy end between you and
    your opponent"

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Smith View Post
    Not to mention that I'm sure the original poster has managed to get a sword in the 12 years since he asked that question.
    Lol, you never know, he could still be shopping around...

  14. #14
    Shoot, I meant to write ~$900! Ha yea $400 would be a steal. My apologies
    Katana Reviews - Quality in our weapons leads to quality in our art.

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