Page 2 of 9 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 26 to 50 of 215

Thread: Basket Hilts

  1. #26
    English, probably last half of the 1700s.
    34" straight se blade with single narrow back fuller. There are some traces of etched designs on the blade.
    The basket is similar to those shown in Mazansky, p. 14-145.
    The grip is one of my restorations.
    Attached Images Attached Images   

  2. #27
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    279

    Scottish Basket-Hilt

    Hi Eljay

    The Scottish Brass Basket hilt is a real stunner and the Guard on your Scottish "Turcael" reminds me of a Scottish Backsword in our collection. The smooth hilt configuration is extremely similar, sadly mine has a mundane straight blade.

    Scottish Basket-Hilt
    Date Circa 1725-1740 (18th Century)
    Overall Length 103 cm (40.6 inches)
    Blade length 88 cm (34.6 inches)
    Blade widest point 3.5 cm (1.4 inches)
    Hilt widest point 15.1 cm (5.9 inches)
    Inside grip length 10.7 cm (4.2 inches)

    Description
    Scottish Backsword: flat backed 34½" single edged blade with single fuller & silver grey patina; hand wrought Glasgow style basket slightly loose; wooden spiral grooved grip with some borer damage, lacking covering but retains buff leather hand protection inside front of basket; brown patina mixed with areas of silvery patina to basket; C.1725-1740.

    The Baron of Earlshall Notes: in his letter 15/5/08
    This sword appears to be a good example of what I describe in my book as the “Conventional Basket Hilt” I.e. with a pattern of 4 pierced hearts on the junction plates, with 4 circular holes in each corner, and a pair of opposed pierced hearts separated by twin circular holes on knuckle guard and side plates. This is in many ways the classical Scottish sword which appears not only in the last quarter of the 17th century but up to after the 1745 rising, continuing in the British Army cavalry until the 1760’s. However yours is Scottish and while the date is speculative I personally would date it slightly later – without having personally examined it to 1725-40. It appears to be a good honest example.”

    Cheer Cathey and Rex
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  3. #28
    The family and I are headed out of town for a few days, but I thought that I'd post a few more baskets before departure.

    English, last half of the 1700s.
    34" straight se blade, with narrow and wide fullers; the blade has been shortened, as the fuller runs out through the tip.
    Shagreen grip with copper wire binding.
    This hilt is composed of 3 scrolled branches to each side, but it is not symmetrical. The branches on the right curve up higher than those on the left, and have connecting members, unlike those on the left. The hilt is of very robust construction.
    Attached Images Attached Images   

  4. #29
    English, last half of the 1700s.
    35" straight se blade with the usual English fullering.
    Grip of shagreen with copper wire ropes.
    Guard is of heart form, pierced with scrollwork. Pommel, side branches, and edge of guard are all ribbed.
    Attached Images Attached Images   

  5. #30
    Englsih half basket grenadier's (?) sword.
    30" curved se blade with single narrow back fuller; retains traces of stamped "S Harvey".
    This sword appears to never have been taken apart, and while somewhat pitted, retains its original grip. Only the grip wrap and wire are missing.
    Mazansky p. 230 shows this hilt type, along with what is probably an officer's version.
    Attached Images Attached Images   

  6. #31
    English half basket grenadier's sword, ca. 1750.
    26" curved se blade with single back fuller, stamped with the fox and SH of the Harveys.
    Grip wrapped with sharkskin and bound with a brass wire.
    Guard is of open heart form, and the basket is composed of S shaped members. There is what appears to be an original heavy leather pad at the base of the guard.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  7. #32
    English half basket grenadier's sword, ca. 1750.
    26" curved se blade with single back fuller, stamped with the fox and SH of the Harveys.
    Grip wrapped with sharkskin and bound with a brass wire.
    Guard is of open heart form, and the basket is composed of S shaped members. There is what appears to be an original heavy leather pad at the base of the guard.

  8. #33
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    279

    S-Bar Basket Hilts

    Hi Eljay, thanks for posting the S-Bar, I have a similar one in Brass. The one I am posting now is earlier, and Scottish with an unusual Black Jappaned hilt.

    BASKET-HILT Scottish Infantry Officer’s
    Date Circa 1690-1710 (17th - 18th Century)?
    Nationality Scottish
    Overall Length 96.5 cm (38 inches)
    Blade length 83 cm (32.7 inches)
    Blade widest point 3 cm (1.2 inches)
    Hilt widest point
    Inside grip length
    Marks, etc The numbers 1 5 1 5 inscribed in the fuller followed by to small marks inlaid with brass.

    Description
    BASKET-HILT Scottish Infantry Officer’s broadsword circa 1690-1710. Blade 32 3/4 ins. (83cm). Hilt retains japanning and is the S type basket. Blade is in good condition and has what appears to be the numbers 1 5 1 5 inscribed in the fuller followed by to small marks inlaid with brass. Grip is made of wood.

    References:
    AMERICAN SOCIETY OF ARMS COLLECTORS: BOOK OF Edged Weapons. Pp200 plate 5
    BEZDEK, Richard H. SWORDS AND SWORD MAKERS OF ENGLAND AND SCOTLAND pp 371
    BOTTOMLEY, Andrew. Catalogue No 6 item no 580 Pp78
    CURTIS, T. Lysle Price guide Militaria Arms & Armour 1993. Pp108
    DARLING.A.D. Weapons of the Highland Regiments 1740-1780. Pp15.
    OAKESHOTT, E. European Weapons and Armour. (See Claymore) pp 175-182.

    Cheers Cathey and Rex
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  9. #34

    Ugly Duckling, Beautiful Swan

    Hi Cathey & Eljay, Thank you both for inviting me to this Basket Hilt Fiesta. It looks like we have lots of guests who are bringing beautiful presents for all of us to share.

    I hope I can make a few contributions.

    First is my Ugly Duckling who became a Beautiful Swan after lots of TLC from Donnie Shearer, a superb sword restorer and sword maker.

    This early 18th C. Glasgow hilt sword arrived enveloped in a complete coating of rust. The rust was even throughout the sword, no heavy accumulations, no pitting, just rust.

    The wide blade was one of those on which the top edge had been filed or ground down when double-edged blades went out of fashion and backswords became the flavor of the month. Yet, underneath that rust lurked a beautiful Andrea Ferrara blade, markings previously illegible.

    When the hilt was cleaned, it showed a fine piece of worksmanship, though unsigned, and the bottom of the hilt had decorative lines, which indicated the degree of craftsmanship involved.

    My Swan now occupies a prominent and well-deserved place among my basket hilts.
    Attached Images Attached Images            
    Last edited by bob erlandson; 04-12-2015 at 09:12 PM.

  10. #35

    Mystery Beauty

    This is my "mystery beauty"; I know what it is but I don't know why.

    It is a standard design Wilkinson Scottish Officers' Broadsword made in 1966, with a Queen"s Own Cameron Highlanders blade which has a blank presentation cartouche. The blade has no number.

    The big difference is that the hilt and the scabbard are made of hallmarked silver. The pommel is thistle shape and there are gilt Cameron thistle and St. Andrew badges applied on the hilt.

    The scabbard has no carrying rings. It has applied thistle decorations at the tip, just above the ball.

    The sales manager at Wilkinson said he could find no record of the sword and that there was no one still at the company who was there in 1966. He declined to provide any contacts among retired employees. The Highlanders Museum at Fort George was equally mystified.

    The Wilkinson sales manager said it would cost many thousands of dollars to re-create this sword today. I would love to know for whom the sword was intended.

    So my "mystery beauty" remains just that, beautiful and a mystery.
    Attached Images Attached Images         

  11. #36

    American Civil War basket hilts

    The 79th New York State Militia Regiment (Cameron Highlanders) marched proudly out of New York with their kilts swaying and pipers playing. Their officers carried basket hilts, as can seen in the engraving, which is probably from Harper's Magazine.

    The two swords in this post were probably carried by officers, or an officer and a sergeant, of the 79th New York.

    The first was a broadsword made by Horstmann & Sons, of Philadelphia. The blade markings were those used between 1844 and 1863. The blade is etched with thistle decorations and the scabbard,of leather with iron mounts, is set so it can be carried on a baldrick, on a sword belt or in a frog.

    The second sword, made by Emerson and Silver, of Trenton, NJ, is marked US 1863 could have been carried by an officer or a sergeant. The single-edged blade has no decorative etching. The grip is wire-wrapped and the ball-shaped pommel is faceted.

    The scabbard is all metal with a hook to carry in a baldrick or a frog on a waistbelt.

    Both swords have the S hilts made popular in 18th C. Scottish basket hilts.

    There are no regimental markings on either sword but time and place suggests strongly that they were carried by men of the 79th, the only kilted regiment in the Union Army. And as such, they are rare relics of the Civil War.
    Attached Images Attached Images             
    Last edited by bob erlandson; 04-12-2015 at 09:17 PM.

  12. #37

    Broadsword with double Jacobite markings

    An early 18th C. Scottish broadsword which carries markings for the 1715 Rebellion and the 1745 Rebellion led by Bonnie Prince Charlie that ended at Culloden in 1746, changing the face of Scotland forever.

    One side of the Solingen-marked blade is etched "No Union, 1712. The number is faint but legible. This slogan was used by those who wanted to overturn the 1707 union between Scotland England.

    On the other side is "Right and Prosperity to Scotland," a slogan among used in the 1745 Rebellion to help Prince Charles recapture the English crown for the Stuarts.

    The slogans appear to have been added after the sword had been sold into England, unlike many blades which carried pro-Jacobite slogans added by canny German blademakers.

    A fine remembrance of one of history's best known Lost Causes.
    Attached Images Attached Images       
    Last edited by bob erlandson; 04-13-2015 at 07:16 PM.

  13. #38

    Jacobite backsword with German markings

    An 18th C. backsword with the Jacobite slogan "God Protect The Righteous Scots" in German on the blade.

    An example of German blade makers knowing their market in Scotland and providing appropriate merchandise.

    Still other blades had long and elaborate Jacobite etchings. I will post some examples soon.
    Attached Images Attached Images     

  14. #39

    Broadsword with apparent Jacobite association

    This sword is very similar to one illustrated in Mazansky, page 99 F4a. In style it is reminiscent of the decorative style developed by the Scottish hilt makers in Stirling towards the middle of the 18th century.

    What makes this example of particular interest is the engraving on the frontal guard plates of "J R" which presumably stands for "Jacobus Rex," -- the would-be King James 8th and 3rd, the "King Over The Water" and the own was a Jacobite.
    Attached Images Attached Images      

  15. #40

    Early 18th C shable/turcael

    This sword goes by several names, including turcael, shable or shabel, cutlass, hanger and sabre.

    It is basically a sword with a curved blade and there are illustrations of examples with fine Glasgow-style hilts.

    This sword, however, has an iron hilt in the style of the infantry swords by Drury and Jeffries for Highland regiments, with the addition of a horseman's reins ring and an added extension of the wrist guard.

    The unmarked single-edged blade is quite heavy and from horseback would have delivered a fearsome blow.

    Tony Willis, in an article titled "Notes on the dating of early Glasgow Style Scottish Basket-Hilted Swords" in the Spring 2015 catalogue of the London Park Lane Arms Fair, points out that Scottish shables are a little-studied area of sword collecting, primarily, he notes, because so few of them survive.

    Charles Whitelaw shows that in August 1699 two Glasgow armourers received "shable" blades to mount for The Company of Scotland trading in Africa, Mr. Willis reported. Prior to this, two armourers supplied "250 mounted shables" to the same company.

    The cooperation of Glasgow's armourers was important because the city was developing as an important port.
    Mr. Willis wrote, "the importance of shables to Glasgow's armourers is indicated by the surviving records of test pieces for admissions to the corporation." Shables were submitted in1695 and by two men in 1702, he wrote.

    "Glasgow style basket hilted shables seem mainly to be a late 17th and early 18th Century phenomenon as far as records assimilated by Whitelaw," Mr. Willis continued. "There are no records in Whitelaw of shables being required as test pieces by the Incorporation after 1702."

    John Gray, a Glasgow ship master, was a customer for cutlasses which are also referred to as shables, Mr. Willis wrote. The idea of a shable being a cutlass would make more sense of the earlier references for shables being supplied for maritime expeditions.
    Attached Images Attached Images    
    Last edited by bob erlandson; 04-15-2015 at 07:53 AM.

  16. #41
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    279

    Jacobite slogan’s

    Hi Bob and welcome,
    Thank you so much for displaying such great Basket hilts, you seem to have acquired a lot more since I last saw pictures of your walls at home or have you been holding out on me? Love the swords with the Jacobite slogan’s, I only have one of these and strangely it appears to be an English Dragoons basket that makes no sense at all, however here it is

    English Dragoon Basket Hilt?
    Date Circa 1760-1780 (18th Century) ?
    Nationality British Dragoon Basket (Scottish Regiment) -Scottish Patriotic Blade
    Overall Length 107.2cm (42.2 inches)
    Blade length 91.4 cm (36 inches)
    Blade widest point 3.687 cm (1.5 inches)
    Hilt widest point
    Inside grip length

    Description
    English Dragoon Basket Hilt? with a Scottish 36 “ (91.4 cm) back blade with two fullers, double edged for last 11 “ (28.1 cm). Along the top of the area of decoration on the blade are the words “this was the sword of the immortal saviour” below this is the Scottish Lion flanked on either side with foliage decoration then below that the words “ Wallace Regent of Scotland A.D. 1298.”

    General Remarks
    This sword originally came to Australia from Arbour Antiques London where it was purchased by a friend many years ago. When Arbour received the sword, the blade had been completely bent over at the hilt as if someone had sought to destroy it or at least render it useless. My understanding is that Arbour had the blade reheated and straightened and the sword restored to its current condition. Reheating the blade has removed colour from one side. The sword has a typically English Pommel but there is an area of engraved decoration that does not seem to fit with the sword serving in an English Regiment. Along the top of the area of decoration are the words “this was the sword of the immortal saviour” below this is the Scottish Lion flanked on either side with foliage decoration then below that the words “ Wallace Regent of Scotland A.D. 1298.”

    I have difficulty believing that an English soldier would dare carry a blade in the memory of William Wallace, or that a Scot serving in an English regiment would take such a risk. According to Pat Tougher “Scottish Sword and Shield” This sword is an odd one. The pommel and the basket appear to be English dragoon 1760 thru to 1780. The blade he feels is older, possibly a pickup form the battle of Culloden, 1746. He advised that there were many English troops who picked up swords after the battle and kept them as they were better than what they had. Pat has a few in his possession.

    I still think it would be either a very brave or rather stupid Scott to carry such a thing in an English regiment.

    Cheers Cathey and Rex
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  17. #42

    Irish Officer's Backsword, C. 1740

    The elaborately etched brass hilt of this sword is the style reportedly favored by Irish officers. The sword retains its original black leather lining and the remains of its dark red wig.

    This sword came from the Continent so it may well have been used by an Irish officer in French service.

    The single-edged blade is fairly stiff and whoever carried it meant business because it is razor sharp from ricasso to tip.
    Attached Images Attached Images        

  18. #43

    Early 18th C. Glasgow brass basket hilt broadsword

    That this sword is of exceptional quality is evident from the pictures. The hilt represents the highest standard of craftsmanship attributed to Glasgow sword production of the period. The blade is similarly of exceptional quality representing finest of German bladesmiths’ work.

    It is formed from flat bars with broad central flutes flanked by narrower grooves either side plus pierced primary and secondary guard plates with grooved edges.

    Of tapering broadsword form the blade is eliptical in section and 34.25 inches (87 cm) long. It has a pronounced ricasso extending some 1.5 inches (4 cm) from the hilt base. Towards the blunt edges on either side of the ricasso a single incised line is cut. From the hilt, passing through the middle of the ricasso, two pronounced fullers either side run in parallel and taper to terminate 10.5 inches (26 cm) down the blade.

    Inside each fuller on each side a series of armourers marks are present. Near to the hilt orb and cross marks are present in each fuller followed by the name JOHANNIS HARTCOP separated by various dot and quatrefoil designs. Either side at a point just beyond the termination of the fullers a running wolf has been incised.
    Attached Images Attached Images           

  19. #44

    Wheel Pommel Backsword, C.1590-1620

    The wheel pommel backsword has thin rectangular bars joined in pairs. The space between the main knuckle guard and the first vertical bar on each side is filled with a thin metal plate as are the spaces on either side of the quillon. This sword is missing one of the front guard plates and both from the quillon. It retains its leather knuckle pad inside the basket hilt.

    The single-edged blade is 27 inches, obviously shortened, probably for use with a targe.]

    According to Mazansky, this type of sword was the first to have additional rear guards on each side of the hilt. This example is missing one of those guards.
    Attached Images Attached Images         

  20. #45
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    279
    Hi Bob,

    Thank you so much for posting the Wheel Pommel, they are so unusual and distinctive. I have still never seen one in the flesh and I doubt I will see one surface in Australia.

    Cheers Cathey and Rex

  21. #46
    Hi Bob,
    Thanks for posting those baskets; you've got a lot of nice ones that I think none of us have seen before. On the wheel pommeled basket - you outbid me on that one! I was going to bid much higher in that auction, but I couldn't get the auction house to send me any details of the blade or hilt. All I had was one small photo, which was insufficient to justify any large bids.

    Next time we visit my wife's relatives in Richmond I'll have to visit you!

    --ElJay

  22. #47
    Hi Eljay, Must plead innocent. I got the wheel pommel a year ago from Donnie Shearer. I remember when he bought it off eBay.
    I look forward to seeing you any time you're in the area. It will be my pleasure.
    cheers,
    bob

  23. #48

    Double ring English horseman's basket hilt backsword, C1750

    This otherwise routine mid-18th C. horseman's backsword is unique in one important feature, it has two reins rings, one on each side of the hilt.

    As a left-hander I say thanks to the hiltmaker for his thoughtfulness.

    The single-edge blade has on both sides the running fox symbol of the Harveys.

    The leather scabbard has brass fittings.

    I would be most interested to know if anyone else has seen a double-ring sword like this.
    Attached Images Attached Images              

  24. #49
    Hi Bob,
    You're right, that was Don that I was bidding against. Speaking of Donnie, I tried to get some contact info for him off the net last week, but he seems to have disappeared. He has a lot of baskets that would be appropriate for this thread, so could you give him an invite to post here?

    --ElJay

  25. #50
    I will ask Donnie to contribute to the thread. I heard from him last week when he returned a scabbard he had repaired for a lovely Glasgow hilt which I haven't posted yet. If you want to email him direct his address is: dspiper@comcast.net

    cheers,
    bob

Page 2 of 9 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •