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Thread: Basket Hilts

  1. #151

    Basket hilt shabel, AKA sabre, cutlass, hanger, C.1740

    This basket hilt sabre has a single-edged , curved blade, 28 inches long with a single fuller. It is stamped "H. VINCENT" on both sides. I have been unable to find any information on Vincent; if anyone knows anything please post an addendum to this post.

    The hilt has sturdy square bars with rudimentary hearts and round holes on the front and side guards. The thick leather basket pad is well shaped for a right-handed user. The remains of a woolen wig are visible between the pommel and the grip, which is triple-wrapped with brass wire.

    The sword has no wrist guard and the rear quillon is quite narrow, leaving little place for a wrist guard. This was characteristic of shables noted by Tony Willis, of Alban Arms & Armour, in his fine article on dating early Glasgow-style hilts in the Spring 2015 catalogue of David Oliver's London Park Lane Arms Fair.

    While they appear infrequently today, basket hilt swords with curved blades were once common, according to Mr. Willis.

    He discusses orders in the late 17th and early 18th Centuries for "mounted shables" for the Company of Scotland trading to Africa by Glasgow makers, including the Simpsons. Shables appear with Glasgow-style hilts in some cases although the article questions whether all of the swords had Glasgow hilts, which were labor-intensive and therefore, more expensive.

    Some of the shables were called "cutlasses" by mariners and were supplied for marine expeditions, Mr. Willis said, adding that Glasgow shables have not been the subject of much intensive study.

    This hilt lacks significant decoration and over-all, the sword appears to be workman-like production, meant for hard use, i.e. a fighting sword. Formerly in the Baron of Earlshalls collection, the sword is well patrinated over-all and is an excellent example of its type.
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  2. #152
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Perth Scotland
    Posts
    1,008
    Bob! you got this one, I looked at this one day and decided to buy it the next but it was gone. It's nice to see it again, I bow to you sir you have some of the best swords I've seen with great photographs.
    David Gray

  3. #153
    Good sword, Bob! And what I find especially interesting is the blade stamping of "H Vincent". I have an English brass hilted sword ca. 1700 +/- 20 years with a typical bilobate hilt decorated with the usual classical figures, and the blade has the same stamp. However, the blade on my sword is 32" long, straight, se, with a narrow back fuller. I have also noted a rapier type blade also marked H Vincent. So does anyone know anything about this bladesmith? I have looked all over the internet and can't find anything.

    --ElJay

  4. #154
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    278
    Hi Bob,

    I am feeling left out now as we do not have one basket hilt with a curved blade.

    Cheers Cathey and Rex

  5. #155
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    278

    Scottish Black Watch 42nd Highland Regiment

    Hi Guys

    My second black watch.

    Date Circa 1750-70 (18th Century)
    Overall Length: 92.2 cm (36.3 inches)
    Blade length: 76.4 cm (30.1 inches)
    Blade widest point: 3.121 cm (1.2 inches)
    Hilt widest point: 13.3 cm (5.2 inches)
    Inside grip length: 11.3 cm (4.4 inches)
    Marks, etc: The Pommel is marked with an F over 20

    Description
    English basket-hilted backsword for highland regiments (42nd Royal Highland Regiment), c1760 with 30.2” blade 76.5 cm. Overall Length 36 ¾ “ 93.3 cm. A Scottish military basket hilted backsword issued to the 42nd Highlanders, circa 1750-1770, straight single edged fullered blade. Regulation hilt, panels pierced with triangular and circular openings. Truncated conical pommel (marked with an F over 20) with spherical button, wire bound leather grip.

    This hilt is typical of those manufactured by Dru Drury Sr, London, however as the blade is unsigned this cannot be confirmed. Whilst this pattern of basket hilt is usually regarded as having been produced by Jeffery’s or Dury, it is probable that Jeffery’s and Drury sub-contracted for finished guards, pommels and blades from Birmingham and assembled them at their London Workshops utilizing their own grips and grip coverings.

    If anyone has any thoughts on what the F over 20 signifies on the pommel I would be most grateful.

    References:
    BEZDEK, Richard H. SWORDS AND SWORD MAKERS OF ENGLAND AND SCOTLAND Pp341
    DARLING, Anthony D. SWORDS FOR THE HIGHLAND REGIMENTS 1757 - 1784
    NEUMANN, George G. SWORDS AND BLADES OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION pp71, plate 30.s & pp142 plate 241.S
    Wallis & Wallis Connoisseur Auction Autumn 2001 9-10/10/2001 Lot 100

    Cheers Cathey and Rex
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  6. #156
    Quote Originally Posted by Cathey Brimage View Post
    Hi Guys

    My second black watch.

    Date Circa 1750-70 (18th Century)
    Overall Length: 92.2 cm (36.3 inches)
    Blade length: 76.4 cm (30.1 inches)
    Blade widest point: 3.121 cm (1.2 inches)
    Hilt widest point: 13.3 cm (5.2 inches)
    Inside grip length: 11.3 cm (4.4 inches)
    Marks, etc: The Pommel is marked with an F over 20

    Description
    English basket-hilted backsword for highland regiments (42nd Royal Highland Regiment), c1760 with 30.2” blade 76.5 cm. Overall Length 36 ¾ “ 93.3 cm. A Scottish military basket hilted backsword issued to the 42nd Highlanders, circa 1750-1770, straight single edged fullered blade. Regulation hilt, panels pierced with triangular and circular openings. Truncated conical pommel (marked with an F over 20) with spherical button, wire bound leather grip.

    This hilt is typical of those manufactured by Dru Drury Sr, London, however as the blade is unsigned this cannot be confirmed. Whilst this pattern of basket hilt is usually regarded as having been produced by Jeffery’s or Dury, it is probable that Jeffery’s and Drury sub-contracted for finished guards, pommels and blades from Birmingham and assembled them at their London Workshops utilizing their own grips and grip coverings.

    If anyone has any thoughts on what the F over 20 signifies on the pommel I would be most grateful.

    References:
    BEZDEK, Richard H. SWORDS AND SWORD MAKERS OF ENGLAND AND SCOTLAND Pp341
    DARLING, Anthony D. SWORDS FOR THE HIGHLAND REGIMENTS 1757 - 1784
    NEUMANN, George G. SWORDS AND BLADES OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION pp71, plate 30.s & pp142 plate 241.S
    Wallis & Wallis Connoisseur Auction Autumn 2001 9-10/10/2001 Lot 100

    Cheers Cathey and Rex
    Hi Cathey,

    Just a probably way-off-the mark thought! Are you sure it was issued to the Black Watch (42nd regiment of Foot)? I can't see any markings to this effect on the photos posted. I see that the very knowledgeable Tony Willis has a similar pattern sword on his Alban Arms website with analogous pommel markings of B over 91 which he attributes to the 91st Regiment of Foot. Your 20 can't refer to the 20th Regiment of Foot which was a Devonshire regiment but - the photo is slightly indistinct - could the 20 possibly be a rubbed 26? The 26th Regiment of Foot were the Cameronians and so might fit the bill. Alternatively it might be a rack or issue number ....

  7. #157

    Swords for the Black Watch & other Highland regiments

    Basket hilt swords made for the Highland regiments in the 18th C. are among the most popular for collectors of English/Scottish swords.

    The best-known are those produced by Nathaniel Jefferys and Dru Drury. They are backswords, which differ from each other only by a few variations in hilt decoration. The hilts are made of relatively thin metal shaped in broad bands.

    The 32 1/2-inch, single-edge blades have one long fuller along the upper part of the blade, which are marked with a crown, GR and either Jefris or Drury.

    One such sword, marked Drury, in the Black Watch Museum in Perth, is said to have been used in the Battle of Ticonderoga, 8 July, 1758. It has no regimental markings.

    However, some authorities have questioned whether these swords would have been under contract before the 1770s.

    Anthony Darling, in his book “Swords of the Highland Regiments, 1757-1784” says there are no records regarding the actual manufacture of these swords. He theorizes that Jeffreys and Drury sub-contracted for parts for their swords from Birmingham and assembled them in their London shops.

    Over the years, a number of these swords have shown up with regimental markings for the Black Watch. Two of them are illustrated, marked on their pommels “42 A 41” and “42 A 22”. I had a third example, marked “A 42 4” which I donated to the Black Watch Museum in 2011.

    Darling, in his book, writes that the only similar example he had seen was marked “42 A 5.”

    The swords would have been issued to privates of the Colonel’s Company, but whether any swords exist marked for other companies of the Black Watch, I have no idea. I have never seen or heard of one.

    In addition, there are photos of two other swords, one by Jeffreys and the other by Drury; neither has regimental markings. Close examination of the photos will show the differences in decoration, a matter of a few lines.

    There is one notable distinction among the Drury blades. The Crowned GR and DRURY are larger on the regimentally marked swords than on the unmarked swords. I have noted this on other Drury swords I have examined over the years.

    In his monograph, Mr. Darling notes that swords were abolished for all except grenadier companies and the Black Watch. The 42nd turned in all of its remaining swords in 1783 to the Halifax ordnance depot, he said, adding that grenadier companies lost their swords the following year.

    I theorize that the marked 42nd swords were probably the late issue because they survive in relatively good condition, with their leather grip wrapping intact. The earlier models, with the small font name and crown, appear far more worn and with grip covering in tatters, if at all.

    As Alan Campbell noted, Tony Willis has a Jeffris sword marked to the 91st for and Bonhams has one marked to the Gordon Fencibles up for auction in San Francisco.

    So far as is known, the Black Watch was issued with Drury swords while various other regiments used the Jeffreys.

    For those interested in further reading on this subject, Mr. Darling’s book, “Swords For The Highland Regiments, 1757-1784,” published by Andrew Mowbray Inc., and his monograph, “Weapons Of The Highland Regiments, 1740-1780” published by Museum Restoration Service of Alexandria Bay, NY, and Bloomfield, Ontario, are available in print.
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  8. #158
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    278
    Hi Alan

    Hard to tell if it was ever a 26, actually the F could just as easily be an E. When I refer to these swords as black watch I am referring to the pattern. Sadly there is nothing to ensure this sword was actually issued to the black watch and for all I know the letters and numbers on the pommel could simply be rack numbers. I am very fond of this pattern though probably because I regard it as the first of the Scottish regimental patterns. I have seen some dramatic variations in quality though and tend to think Jeffries and Drury were not the only manufactures and possible not the first. Would make an interesting area of study for someone who has the time and access to sufficient examples, sadly that is not me.

    Cheers Cathey and Rex

  9. #159
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    May 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    278

    Black Watch Basket hilt - Jeffries

    Hi Guys

    Last of my Black Watch patterns

    Date: Circa 1750-70 (18th Century)
    Nationality: Scottish Black Watch 42nd Highland Regiment
    Overall Length: 96.8 cm (38.1 inches)
    Blade length: 82.8 cm (32.6 inches)
    Blade widest point: 3.5 cm (1.4 inches) fuller runs 63.9 cm (25.2 inches)
    Hilt widest point: 16 cm (6.3 inches)
    Inside grip length: 12 cm (4.7 inches)
    Marks, etc: Nil

    Description
    English Black Watch basket-hilted backsword for highland regiments (42nd Royal Highland Regiment), c1750-70. Straight single edged fullered blade 32” blade 82.8 cm. Overall Length 38.2“, 96.8 cm. Although unmarked the hilt pattern suggests the Maker to be Jeffrey’s of London. Regulation Jefferys hilt, panels pierced with triangular darted and circular openings, line engravings included in panel decoration. The three branches of the guard are riveted to a ring which fits around the truncated conical pommel with spherical button, leather grip wire missing.

    General Remarks
    Slight difference in Guard construction indicates this sword was probably supplied by Nathaniel Jefferies London. No maker, retailer or Military marks found.

    When I compare this sword to my two others by Drury the guard is distinctly different. In referring to this as Black Watch I am really referring to the pattern, this sword could have been used by other regiments at the time.

    Given the variation in quality I have seen in these swords I concur with others that it is likely they were manufactured either whole or in part by other cutlers beside Drury and Jeffries. All three in my collection have quite substantial and well-made guards, however I have seen others with guards that felt almost like tin as they were so light and poorly made.

    References:
    AMERICAN SOCIETY OF ARMS COLLECTORS: BOOK OF Edged Weapons. Plate 4 pp209
    BEZDEK, Richard H. SWORDS AND SWORD MAKERS OF ENGLAND AND SCOTLAND Pp341
    DARLING, Anthony D. SWORDS FOR THE HIGHLAND REGIMENTS 1757 - 1784 published by Andrew Moebray Inc pp13,
    NEUMANN, George G. SWORDS AND BLADES OF THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION pp71, plate 30.s, pp42 plate 243.S
    Wallis & Wallis Connoisseur Auction Autumn 2001 9-10/10/2001 Lot 100

    Cheers Cathey and Rex
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  10. #160
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    May 2002
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    Australia
    Posts
    278

    Pattern 1798 Brass hilted Basket

    Brass hilted Pattern 1798 Offices Basket Hilt
    Date: c1798
    Nationality: Scottish
    Overall Length: 38 ¼” 97.1cm
    Blade length: 32 ¾” 83.2 cm
    Blade widest point: 1.1/2” 3.7 cm
    Hilt widest point: 5 ¼” 13.5 cm
    Inside grip length: 4 ¼” 10.2 cm
    Marks, etc.: J J Runkel Solingen (only the letters J J R and gen are clear)

    Description
    Basket Hilt-Scottish-c1798-Highland Officer broadsword Brass hilt
    Highland infantry officer's broadsword; the type carried by Scottish infantry regiments during the Peninsula War and Battle of Waterloo against Napoleon's forces. The single fullered broad sword blade is marked J J Runkel Solingen, has been ground at some point which gives it the illusion of being watered. The hilt is brass hilt is constructed of solid plain panels and has remnants of past gilding. The grip is fish skin with brass wire. Provenance : William Kearney Collection (Adams Auctions Dublin 1990)

    General Remarks
    The 1798 Pattern was the first attempt by the British to standardize sword patterns for the Scottish regiments and was very loose in some respects, with blades coming from Solingen (Prussia / Germany), England and Scotland, clearly with officers mounting the blades from their existing pre-pattern. All highlander officers were wearing this sword at Waterloo. Scottish regiments from loyalist families as well as some rearmed rebel families who had sworn allegiance to the king, were fielded in the war with France. Officers were armed with these swords as a concession to their fiercely defended Scottish heritage.
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  11. #161

    Unusual basket hilt backsword.

    This heavy, sturdy sword has long been a mystery to me, both origin and date.

    The only markings are on both sides of the blade: Thistle in a garter inscribed Nemo Me Lacessit Impune, the Scottish national motto, surmounted by what appears to be a grenade.

    The grenade, however, is not as flamboyant as that of the Royal Scots Fusiliers.

    The large basket has an S in the side guards on either side. The rams' horns are marked with parallel lines that resemble a fringe and there is a shield-shaped marking on each side.

    The bars of the hilt include hearts, circles and various other non-traditional piercings.

    The pommel is large and faceted all around with a decorative pommel button. Some of the leather remains on the wood grip, which is wound with two-strand brass wire.

    The 32-inch single-edge blade is 1 1/4 inches wide for most of its length. There is a single 22 1/2-inch fuller above a raised pipe that extends all the way to the tip of the blade. The last 9 1/2 inches of the blade are double-edged.

    I have not encountered a similar sword before. I speculate that it could have belonged to a volunteer fusilier officer or perhaps to a retired officer who served in a fusilier unit.

    It has no real similarities to any regular government sword I've seen. If anyone on SFI has seen one like this and can identify it please do so.
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  12. #162
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Kingston area, Ontario Canada
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    2,875
    The blade and etching looks 1830's to me.

  13. #163
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    278

    Unusual basket hilt backsword

    Hi Bob
    I knew I had a similar sword saved in my data base. This one was originally on Michael Longs site back in 2009 the description is as follows:

    "Interesting basket hilted broadsword with owners crest This has a plated steel basket guard, the front with an applied silver beaded diamond, engraved with the owners crest, this crest is also on all three silver scabbard mounts, and the top one is also engraved, W.D.LAMOND, the grip is leather covered and bound with a triple wire, and the pommel is faceted and of bun shape, it has a German made blade, the ricasso is struck with a Kings head logo, the blade is 27 inches in length and with a central fuller, it is well etched with military trophies and foliate scrolls, it is complete with its silver mounted leather scabbard, some plating wear to the hilt."

    There was no mention of a date in this listing, though I suspect George the 4th or William?

    Hope this helps.

    Cheers Cathey and Rex
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  14. #164
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    May 2002
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    Australia
    Posts
    278

    More pictures of this example

    Hi Bob, here are some additional pics of the blade.

    Cheers

    Cathey and Rex
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  15. #165
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    May 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    278

    Scottish Private Purchase Basket Hilt

    Hi Guys

    I am now running into my more contemporary basket hilts, although this is one of two private purchase examples I have that are pre-date the 1828 Pattern.

    Nationality: British importer, Scottish Sword with German Blade
    Date: Circa 1800-1808
    Maker/Retailer: J J Runkel
    Overall Length: 39” 99 cm
    Blade length; 33” 83.8 cm
    Blade widest point: 1 ½” 3.9 cm
    Hilt widest point: 5 2/4” 13.7 cm
    Inside grip length: 4” 10.1 cm
    Marks, etc.: J J Runkel Solingen

    Description
    SCOTTISH STEEL BASKET HILT SWORD: 33" double edged blade marked RUNKEL SOLINGEN to both sides with areas of light & dark staining & short fullers; very good hilt & pommel with grey finish; fish skin grips bound with woven silver wire.

    General Remarks
    From around 1778 to 1808 J J Runkel imported many thousands of swords and blades from Solingen for the British Market. From around 1800 the spelling of Solingen changed by the omission of the ‘h’ between the ó’and ‘l’.

    At first glance this sword appears to be a typical regimental 828 pattern basket hilt, however when you put this sword alongside a more traditional 1828 the guard has a number of differences. The first is the blade, these pre-pattern or private purchase baskets often sported the early Runkel blades common on the brass hilted 1798 pattern swords

    Looking just at the hilt construction, the plate of the side guard is scalloped and decorated with circles and lines as apposed the regular pattern heart decoration. The outer shields have only four hearts and small circles as opposed to the eight hearts on the regular pattern example. The lobes on the side guards are not joined as in the 1828 pattern.

    Cheers Cathey and Rex
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  16. #166
    Hi Cathey,
    That sword is still on the Michael Long website, with a higher price than before. I wrote to the Lord Lyon King of Arms about the crest and the Lamond name years ago. I don't remember the details of the reply but they couldn't match up the name and crest as I recall.

    It's an interesting sword but not being able to make the match dampened my interest in it.

    I have a beautiful Victorian Black Watch sword with the finest blade I've ever seen, complete with family crest. But I have not been able to match an officer's name with the crest.

    Maddening, isn't it?

    Happy New Year to you and Rex,
    Bob

  17. #167
    The only sword in my collection
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  18. #168
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
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    Hi Todd

    Welcome to the Basket hilt thread and thank you for sharing your signed basket. I would love to see some higher resolution pictures of your sword, signed basket hilts are rather rare and always interesting. You mentioned this is the only sword in your collection, do you mean the only basket hilt? or is this sword the beginning of your collection.

    Regards Cathey and Rex

  19. #169
    Hello Cathey,

    Yes, I'm attaching some additional photos below. However, I must apologize as I'm not sure that I can provide higher resolution photos as my cell phone just doesn't take that great of photos. It is the only basket hilt and the only sword in my collection. The remaining portion of my collection include a rather unique Scottish dirk (probably circa 1878). The sword has an Andrea Ferara blade and I believe that it is a sister sword to a basket hilt in the National Museum of Scotland in Edinburgh in the Allan family display of basket hilts.
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    Thanks,
    Todd
    Last edited by Todd Salazar; 03-05-2016 at 11:30 PM.

  20. #170
    Hi all, just reposting this from the Mortuary post where I first went for info on what I thought could have been a Mort sword pommel used on a more recent English/Scottish basket hilt from mid 18th century.
    ElJay noted in that post that it is more likely a rapier pommel than a Mort.
    Do any of the other Basket hilt sword experts have any other advice?

    The lovely battered history of this sword has me addicted to this period of my Scottish ancestry now

    Info-
    Mid 18th century highland back sword with globular pommel, wooden handle
    Weight 1.2kg
    Blade length 84cm
    Blade width 3.5cm at base
    Sword 101cm
    Centre balance 7cm from hilt base

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    Last edited by Heath Mc; 03-09-2016 at 05:03 AM.

  21. #171
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    278
    Hi Todd
    I must say if this is the only sword in your collection you have a fabulous foundation piece. I note that it is signed J A S which according to page 35 of MAZANSKY (C.) BRITISH BASKET-HILTED SWORDS: A TYPOLOGY OF BASKET-TYPE SWORD HILTS. This would appear to indicate it could be by John Allan of Stirling 1741 or john Allan Senior 1714. However, the style of hilt looks more like a Simpson or Gemmel to me. It might be worth you sending some picture of your sword to the Baron of Earlshall to identify the maker of the hilt. His website is:

    http://www.thescottishbaskethiltedsword.co.uk/

    Cheers Cathey

  22. #172
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
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    Posts
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    Hi Heath

    Welcome to the basket hilt thread, I have been off line for a while. I think Eljay is correct; the pommel probably comes from a rapier. I have a basket that has a pommel from a complete different sword group as well. It appears if you needed a repair and the local sword smith would use whatever was at hand. What is unusual is the use of a pommel that pre-dates the sword. Nice early basket, keep posting.

    Cheers Cathey and Rex

  23. #173
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    80
    Regarding the numbering of Swords, here is an entry from the 2d Battalion of the 42nd

    New York 16 th April 1759
    The three Companys here of the 2 nd Ba ttn to have their swords numbr d and lettred as soon as possible beginning with the letter “L” the 1 st B n having ended with the letter “K.”

    This of course does not mean that any sword with an L or above is a 2/42 Sword, but its a good indicator.

    The 78th we know had their swords marked 2/HB, prior to them becoming the 63d, and then 78th ROF. As far as I know there has not been anything identified for Montgomery's Highlanders, AKA 1/HB, 62d/77th or any of the other F&I era Highland units that were sent to the Continent.

  24. #174
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    southern Sweden
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    26
    Quote Originally Posted by Cathey Brimage View Post
    Hi Guys, here is a Brass Hilted S-Bar which was one of the first few Baskets we purchased.

    Date: Circa 1714-1750 (18th Century)
    Nationality: English/Scottish Grenadier Company
    Overall Length : 101.5 cm (40 inches)
    Blade length: 87cm (34.3 inches)
    Blade widest point: 4cm (1.6 inches)
    Hilt widest point: 12.7 cm
    Inside grip length: 10.4 cm
    Marks, etc.: Mark on Sword blade, possibly German trade mark, Darling refers to it as the Solingen anchor.

    Description
    BASKET-HILT British 1714-1750 Brass hilted backsword
    Makers mark Solingen anchor and British broad arrow signifying government property on both sides of blade. English Dragoon, plain tapering single edged blade. The brass hilt consists of a flattened, mushroom-shaped pommel with affixed tang button and a guard made up of an open-work counterguard and four narrow vertical bars whose apices are soldered to a ring into which the base of the pommel fits. The bars are interconnected by three open “S” figures thus giving more protection to the thumb and fingers. The quillon is omitted, but the counter guard’s bar bend out on both corners to protect the hand in that area. Its straight single edged blade has a 23.5 cm false edge and a 64 cm fuller. The grip is wood, its leather cover long gone and the wood shows considerable worm damage.

    General Remarks
    Note: In the lately discovered regimental History of the Queens Own Hussars (7th Light dragoons) by C.R.B. Barrett and published in tow volumes in 1914, this type of sword is stated to have been used by that regiment, but at a date no later than 1714.

    References:
    AMERICAN SOCIETY OF ARMS COLLECTORS: BOOK OF EDGED WEAPONS Mid 18th Century British Military Swords with open S Panelled Guard by Anthony D Darling pp140-154
    BEZDEK, Richard H. SWORDS AND SWORD MAKERS OF ENGLAND AND SCOTLAND pp 325
    DUFTY, Arthur Richard, European Swords and Daggers in the Tower of London Pp28 Plate 69 (c).
    LENKIEWICZ, Zygmunt S. 1000 Marks of European Blade Makers Pp1
    MARTYN, C. THE BRITISH CAVALRY SWORD FROM 1600. pp50
    Mazansky – Cyrill British basket Hilted Swords Pp212, Fig IVA4, 216 Fig IVBC3 (c1725-50)
    NEUMANN, George G. Swords & Blades of the American Revolution Pp 152 plate 272s.
    WAGNER, Eduard, SWORDS AND DAGGERS Pp102, plate 70.
    WALLIS & WALLIS Connoisseur Collectors Sale Spring 1996 1/5/96 Lot 128

    Cheers Cathey and Rex
    Hello from Sweden! I recently picked up a the same type of sword as the one above. It has been in a Swedish collection for many of years and now a long time since the former owner passed away I got to buy it from his relatives.

    I suppose that these are pretty hard to find, especially in this fine condition and I would be glad if I could get a hint of its present value. It might be up for sale later as I mostly collect Swedish items.
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  25. #175

    http://s1347.photobucket.com/user/Ti...ml?sort=3&o=47
    http://s1347.photobucket.com/user/Ti...ml?sort=3&o=58
    http://s1347.photobucket.com/user/Ti...ml?sort=3&o=60
    http://s1347.photobucket.com/user/Ti...ml?sort=3&o=61
    http://s1347.photobucket.com/user/Ti...ml?sort=3&o=51
    http://s1347.photobucket.com/user/Ti...wjhtl.jpg.html

    These are family swords once owned by Andrew Anderson a surgeon to the 92nd during the Napoleonic Wars - however we believe that they were in the family before that. The basket on the older sword was cut away after it was crushed trapping his hand after defending himself against the charge of the cuirassiers. Any information on the likely dates etc of these swords would be much appreciated.

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