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Thread: Kaskara?

  1. #1
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    Kaskara?

    I need some help if possible.
    cruciform hilt 6 inches wide
    Total 35 3/4 but is missing part of tang
    Blade 32 9/16
    Width 1 5/8
    Thich 3/16
    4 langets 1 inch long
    How do you date a kaskara? Would this be a Sudanese made blade? Certainly not Solingen made? Similar to early espada ancha blades but different. Hexagonal blade. Most of photos of the Sudanese kaskaras I have looked at only have forward facing langets. Would this be a style from a specific area? Thanks Eric
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    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  2. #2
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    Looks like a locally-made blade. Both forward and backward facing langets are usual; the backward langets are set into the grip (so the outer surface is level with the grip core, and then covered by the grip cover. So they're not visible when the hilt is intact, but they're there. They help securely hold the guard in place.

    Why do you think it's missing part of the tang? AFAIK, these usually have a partial tang, with glue/resin and/or pin. Looks complete to me.

    A nice paper showing the construction of a kaskara, complete with x-rays showing tang and guard in hilt:
    http://cool.conservation-us.org/anag...GPIC_Grady.pdf
    "In addition to being efficient, all pole arms were quite nice to look at." - Cherney Berg, A hideous history of weapons, Collier 1963.

  3. #3
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    Very interesting Timo, might be a fun project on a rainy day. Anyway to guess a date on these? Any traits or style changes? How many years were they made? Eric
    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  4. #4
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    They've been made for hundreds of years. They look like they developed from the Syrian/Egyptian double-edged straight Medieval sword, so might go back as far as a thousand years. Don't know about regional differences, or style changes over time.
    "In addition to being efficient, all pole arms were quite nice to look at." - Cherney Berg, A hideous history of weapons, Collier 1963.

  5. #5
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    I picked up a few pole arms in Mexico and southern border states this winter including 3 pike types, a couple spoontons, an ox goad and a hocking device. Not the full Media Luna but a wore down model. Are you a pole arm guy?
    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  6. #6
    Thank you for this informative thread. I have what I believe is a European 'trade blade' for one of these Kaskara - I always thought the tang had been broken/cut off somehow. The idea that they were made with only partial tangs never occurred to me. I'll try and dig out my blade and post some pics of it over the weekend.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Fairbanks View Post
    I picked up a few pole arms in Mexico and southern border states this winter including 3 pike types, a couple spoontons, an ox goad and a hocking device. Not the full Media Luna but a wore down model. Are you a pole arm guy?
    Always interesting to see new polearms. Don't know much about American/Colonial polearms, so lots to learn.
    "In addition to being efficient, all pole arms were quite nice to look at." - Cherney Berg, A hideous history of weapons, Collier 1963.

  8. #8
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    We covered everything up today getting ready to remodel my sword room. Should be done in couple of weeks and I will dig them out.
    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  9. #9
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    Dating question also

    Eri
    I don't want to hijack you thread but wanted to share details of a Sudanese Kaskara that has just come into my possession and have the same question as you..

    Catalogue description:
    19th Century Armoury marked Sudanese Kashkha(sic) Sword. 35 1/4 inch double edged wide blade. Short triple fullers.Crescent moon face Armoury stamps toboth sides of the blade. Steelchamfered crossgu. Leather covered grip with disc pommel. Containedin its tooled leather scabbard with steel belt buckle. Tip of scabbard absent.

    My Stats:
    Weight, sword:2lb 6oz (1.09kg)
    Length overall: 40'' (102cm) Blade:35.5''(90cm)
    POB: 9.5'' (24
    cm)
    Profiletaper: 1.72'' (43.9mm) at ricasso, 1.46'' (37.1mm) mid blade, 1.32'' (33.5mm) 2 inches from tip.
    Distal taper 0.21'' (5.4mm) at ricasso, 0.16'' (4mm) mid blade. 0.1'' (2.6mm) 2inches from tip.

    I don't believe that the pairs of moon facestamps both sides of the blade are armoury stamps, I have read that they denote a locally made blade that is copying marks found on some trade blades. Anybody know any more? The scabbard is probably beyond saving but has the remains of nice tooling on theleather. I am applying copious amounts of Pecards and neatsfoot oil.

    My question is also: Is there a reliable way of dating these swords? Or does one just look at the general state of the dirt (patina) and say ' Late 19th century', with fingers crossed behind back!
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    The journey not the destination

  10. #10
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    Guy, the big difference in our swords that I notice is the quality of craftsmanship of yours verses mine. Mine is extremely crude while yours is well formed with even fullers. I also understand all of the moon stamped swords to be local effort. I do not know if trade blades came with the moon marks but certainly yours was made by a better craftsmen. Our Spanish forum friends have a weath of knowledge on these and can possibly shed some light on it. One thread I looked at
    http://www.swordforum.com/forums/sho...t=espada+ancha
    may be of interest. My facination in them has to do with Islamic and Solingen influence on Spanish Colonial swords.Thanks for coming in very interesting to see the crude and more refined side by side. Eric
    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

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