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Thread: Antique Flame Daggers - Danascus Steel

  1. #1
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    May 2012
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    Antique Flame Daggers - Danascus Steel

    A friend of mine in Europe was given those two antique flame daggers last week and would like to know more about them. The blades are Damascus steel; the handles are beautifully carved.

    Can you please let me (us) know more about them?
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Kotzmann View Post
    A friend of mine in Europe was given those two antique flame daggers last week and would like to know more about them. The blades are Damascus steel; the handles are beautifully carved.

    Can you please let me (us) know more about them?
    Hi! Charlie,

    I am Donny from Indonesia, Jakarta.
    I am not an expert yet in keris matters but I will help what I can.

    About the upper keris, please provide the better picture of it.

    The lower keris' blade design is called Paniwen, with 9 luks (curve). Keris' luk is in odd number starting from 3 to 13.

    The pattern on the blade should have name also, but I cannot differentiate it because the black color on the blade is already fading (for both keris). I see rusty part also which can damage the blade.

    To recreate the distinctive pattern, it need to be cleaned from rust and re-etched with traditional arsenic acid (known as "warangan" in Java).

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    For more information, see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kris (and you might like to visit the links at the bottom, and in the references).

    The most common English spelling is "kris", but "keris" is better. Older books can have a variety of spellings ("creese", "kriss", etc.)

    They're still made (for their use as symbol, ceremonial wear, and for collectors). While yours don't appear to be made yesterday, they might be modern rather than antique (which depends on how old something needs to be to be "antique").
    "In addition to being efficient, all pole arms were quite nice to look at." - Cherney Berg, A hideous history of weapons, Collier 1963.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2012
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    Thank you so much for your replies! I will ask my friend to take much better pictures! When I complained about the picture quality to him he told me that he used his cell phone and only later found out that the lens was all dirty! With better pictures we might also get a better idea about the two pieces....

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