View Poll Results: is the plan sound?

Voters
6. You may not vote on this poll
  • seems fine

    1 16.67%
  • too optimistic for a beginner

    2 33.33%
  • the method is incorrect

    4 66.67%
  • the sword will break on use

    0 0%
Multiple Choice Poll.
Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: opinions on my plan to make a sword

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Ashford, Kent England
    Posts
    19

    opinions on my plan to make a sword

    ok let me start out by saying that i am not a trained black/bladesmith and do this sort of stuff for fun. i also am not in possession of a forge and will be using the removal method of production common in knifemaking (of which i have some, if little, experience). i am also aware that the design i have in mind is not a particularly effective weapon due to it's size, weight and lack of stabbing ability, i just really like the idea and wanted to make it. i do however. want it to be functional (as far as it's admittedly flawed design allows). ok so here's my basic design and plan:

    i have purchaed a strip of 1055 carbon steel, it is 48" long, 4" wide and 0.25" thick, i intend to (by use of a an angle grinder) remove a 1" strip a foot long from each side at one end leaving me a two inch wide one foot long handle and a three foot blade.

    i will then shapen one side of the blade and the end leaving a square "chisel-tip"

    i will harden it by heating it with a (actively ventilated though not quite bellowed) coal fire, and quench it in salt water and then immediately clean it to prevent corrosion

    i will heat it in the fire again and then quench in olive oil (i hear good things about using olive oil but have never tried it)

    to the handle i will apply epoxy resin and then rivet maple scales to the handle to flesh out the grip

    i will then coat the blade in a readily (but not water) soluable paint and scratch out the pattern i want etched into the blade

    i wil use the electricity in salt water etching method and then remove the paint and polish the blade.

    any suggestions for improvement? (this is my first sword after all, i'm not 100% sure i know what i'm doing)

    also will it break if i use it?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    515
    an ambitious plan that starts by removing 50% of the steel you have? why not just cut it in half so that you then have enough for 2 swords?

    what kind of sword is this supposed to be? do you anticipate introducing curvature in the blade on quenching? how do you except to avoid a crack as a novice quenching in water for the first time? how are you going to know when the blade is at the right temperature for quenching? why are you bothering with a second quench in olive oil?

    if you are serious about this project, want to maximize success, and are willing to take constructive criticism, i suggest you seek help on a forum populated by experienced smiths (like don fogg's bladesmithing forum). and really, consider trying a shorter knife first.

  3. #3
    If I understand your description then I suggest you use a mild steel and skip the heat treat all together as I don't see this being functional in any way. I also suggest you do a bit of reading before you proceed. (the above suggest of Don Fogg's forum is excellent, and check your local library for books on bladesmithing/forging)

    ron

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Ashford, Kent England
    Posts
    19
    i don't intend to remove 50% of the steel ,just two, 1 foot long, 1 inch wide strips, also it's not a specific kind of sword, it's just a really big sharp edge with a sharpened chisel tip, as for the heating issue, 1, by the colour mainly and as for the quenching the second oil quench is to reduce the likelihood of a shatter by a slower cooling, i'm currently making quite a few knives, not at a high level but i have functional sharp and durable blades (i'm currently experimenting for acid and electric etching). and as for the cracking i have no idea, what would you recomend as a quench?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Ashford, Kent England
    Posts
    19
    Doc6.doc this is a very rough very quick idea of the design i just made for ease of communication.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Ashford, Kent England
    Posts
    19
    also i don't really suppose you'd call this design a "sword" per se, it's more of a "thing i wildly and aggressively swing at things such as wooden pallettes when i'm frustrated so i don't wreck my favourite sword" kind of deal, you may ask, why not just buy an axe for that? i don't really have a good answer for that, but i doodled a (much larger) version of this sword being weilded by another doodle of a jacked (generic) action hero in the margin of my maths book years ago when i was still in school, and i just really like the idea of it, but i DO need it to be able to take a hell of a pounding. so any thoughts?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    515
    i see, i missed the part about cutting off 1' strips to make a handle. in any case, the problems i envision are 1) a 4" wide .25" piece of steel just sharpened at the edge is going to be one heavy blade -- i wonder if a 12" handle makes sense, 2) judging critical temperature by eye usually takes a fair bit of experience, and 3) the olive oil quench isn't going to help avoid cracks, because the cracks are likely to happen during the brine quench that precedes it (if it survives the water quench, it will need tempering, but not a second quench). good luck.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Ashford, Kent England
    Posts
    19
    if it wasn't ludicrously heavy i frankly wouldn't want it (i'm a big kid really) by my calculations it would weigh somewhere in the region of 5 and a half kilos by the way (i know that's really too heavy to use effectively but i don't plan to fence with it, i just want to hit stuff, i'm pretty strong i think i can mange that least). so if i sent it off for professional heat treatment would the "sword" survive me smacking stuff with it would you say? as an educated guess?

  9. #9
    The weight is going to be distributed all wrong for you to have much control, you'd be better off getting a machete to take out your aggressions or a baseball bat. "Wildly and aggressively" swinging something like this around is likely to get yourself or someone nearby hurt.

    At 0.25" thick, it will survive that with no heat treatment, it might bend but that can be straightened and will be much safer than any heat treatment. Actually, it will probably bend because you'll not have the control needed to hit straight with those dimensions.

    ron

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Ashford, Kent England
    Posts
    19
    i have a machete, it just isn't heavy enough for the kind of really satisfying "smashing" that i find so theraputic, how might i alter the design to redistribute the weight so as to make the swing accurate? i'd like to at least be able to hit my target blade first.

  11. #11
    Then I suggest you forget sword-like and look at mace-like. Swords don't "smash" well. Or find a martial arts school/boxing school and punch a heavy bag.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    51
    The olive oil part seems to be kind of weird ?

    You already did a hardening by heating and quenching in salt water,
    so I guess the olive oil is tempering ?

    Which maybe a hot oil bath might be more controllable than a heat + quench process.

    Monosteel might not break when properly tempered,
    but it might bend on the flat side, maybe spring steel would hold up better against usage.

    A 5 Kilo sword maybe a bit too heavy, and hard to be even balanced.
    Most long swords are around 1 - 2 kg range.

    Maybe this vid might help


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •