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Thread: Japanese Antique Katana & Wakizashi for Sale

  1. #1

    Japanese Antique Katana & Wakizashi for Sale

    Up for sale are a partial Japanese Samurai Daisho (Pair) set of antique swords, a Katana and a Wakizashi.

    The Katana and the Wakizashi are estimated to be from the Shinto period (1596-1763). Both swords have a beautiful dark brown patina on the tang with visible laminar construction on the blades. The blades have been fully polished.

    Each of the blades have been papered by the NBTHK, which typically cost $1,000.00 per blade, and of course the sword must be in full polish, which often costs $100.00 per inch. Do the math, an unpolished sword that is 23" long cost about $2,300.00 to polish and can take months, then it must be submitted for Shinsa in Japan to get papers, which can take up to a year to get the blade back, assuming it will past Shinsa or someone does switch your blade while in Japan.

    The Katana is a shorter variety, while the Wakizashi is thick and robust. Back in the day when Samurai visited castles etc. they were required to leave their Katanas at the door, but were allowed to bring in the Wakizashis, so I was told typically the Wakizashi was often time the better made and beefier sword.

    The swords come with matching sword bags to help protect the finish.

    The first image is the certificate for the Katana followed by pics of the Wak and its papers. I have yet to shoot pics of the Katana.



    Katana Approximate Dimensions & Specs:
    Length: 23" = 58.4 cm
    Thickness: 3/16" = 4.76 mm
    Width: 1" = 2.54 cm
    Tsuba: Iron





    Wakizashi Approximate Dimensions:
    Length: 15" = 38.1 cm
    Thickness: .25" = 6.35 mm
    Width: 1.25" = 3.17 cm
    Tsuba: Shakado



    Cost is only $3,799.95 USD for the Katana, $3,599.95 USD for the Wakizashi, or $6,995.95 for the pair.

    Thanks for looking!

  2. #2
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    Dear sir,
    Both of your swords listed here are Wakizashi, neither is a Katana.

    It might help you sell them if you were to post additional photos of the swords, koshirae, etc..

  3. #3
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    -i would also like to add that submitting for hozon shinsa costs 220~ dollars, almost 400 if you include shipping from/to the U.S, registration and all the mess, certainly not 1000$.

  4. #4
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    Ofek,
    Depending on where you live, due to ever increasing fuel/shipping charges, todays fees for Hozon can run a bit more than $400.
    Of note, both of these swords were papered January, 2015.

    If we use as example a hypothetical sword value of $4500.

    You need a broker to facilitate entry into Japan, as an example my broker charges $300
    Torokusho (registration/license) = 6300Y ($52.45 today)
    Shinsa fee for Hozon = 25000y ($208.12 today)

    From my location in the US to ship to broker & back using Priority express mail, insured at $4500 will cost $150 each way = $300 total
    Registered mail only available in US, is $83 each way = $166 total.

    From broker to Japan and back is $135 one way, = $270 total.

    So, as you can see, from my location, using the cheapest method of shipping, today's fees would run $996.57.

    Of course, these fees are subject to vary +/- from different locations, various brokers, sword values, etc., etc..

  5. #5
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    Argument accepted, though i am sure more reasonable prices for at least part of the process exist.
    Admittingly, the only swords i ever had to send were already registered (have toroku-sho) and shipping was straight to japan, overall costs were less than half of that.
    Might be also because i don't have the 300$ in-country shipping, but rather a 20 minute drive....

  6. #6
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    Oh yes, I wasn't arguing and I agree with you totally that prices vary from place to place. I was just giving an example of what it costs me these days.

    It has gotten to the point that it is hardly worth it unless it is a really good sword. My choice now is to wait for a shinsa held here in the US where I will be attending. The NTHK-NPO is in my opinion by far the best today for swords. They will be in Tampa, Feb 2016. Miyano Sensei is as good as they come.

  7. #7
    I'm sorry that I have not responded, because I thought I subscribe to this thread and not received notification. I will try to post more updated pictures.

    People who have seen both sword say the longer is the shorter end of a Katana.

  8. #8
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    Mr. Lee.
    I don't mean to be rude, and they can be mounted as a daisho.

    Yet, regardless of what people say, the NBTHK papers clearly state "Wakizashi" on both. If it were a Katana it would have this kanji , where yours has wakizashi.

    The length given on the papers as well reflect wakizashi lengths. A Katana must be a minimum of 2 shaku.
    The papers state yours is 1 shaku, 9 sun, 1 bu (57.877202cm or 22.786299999999997 inches).
    Very close, but technically still a wakizashi.

    Again, I apologize for being the one to inform you of this, however, it is important for you to know.

    Name:  Wak_Lee copy.jpg
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    Last edited by Ed M; 09-27-2015 at 01:25 PM.

  9. #9
    Thanks Ed. Yes, the can be mounted as a Daisho. Too busy to shoot pictures. Everyone, including the big time Los Angeles dealer that sold me this must have missed whay you are saying about the Wak length.

  10. #10
    Many times blades of 1.9 shaku are also and can be classified as chiisai katana, this was common among lords, young bushi and elderly samurai. By TODAYS guidelines, this classification by length is a wakizashi. If ones understands the new system, the cm reading is different than the shaku reading for wakizashi and katana as well.
    As a rule, most daisho do not have to match exactly. And in many cases for younger people, longer wakizashi were used for the larger blade. Higher classed daisho would have the entire set of mounts made by the same maker, however, the lower level bushi would often just wear a long and short pair. And as earlier stated, younger bushi would sometimes wear
    2 wakizashi.
    Just as many daisho blades are also NOT made by the same maker.

    Also, 2 shaku is 60.6cm, while the now guidelines is 60cm by the now sword world.

  11. #11
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    Joseph,
    Not sure where you were going with your post as most of it address points which were either not in question, pointless or incorrect.

    Many times blades of 1.9 shaku are also and can be classified as chiisai katana. As a rule, most daisho do not have to match exactly.Just as many daisho blades are also NOT made by the same maker.
    Your statement is pointless. No one said they did, you are providing an answer to that which has not been questioned.

    If ones understands the new system, the cm reading is different than the shaku reading for wakizashi and katana as well.
    HUH ? There is no new system of cm or shaku. Yes, cm is a different system of measurement than shaku or inches for that matter. But, they haven't changed.

    Also, 2 shaku is 60.6cm, while the now guidelines is 60cm by the now sword world.
    WTF ? This has to be one of the most arrogant and idiotic things I have read of late. There is no "NOW" sword world. 2 shaku is 60.6044cm or 23.86" just as it has been and will be. Period!!!! Just because your "now" group doesn't wish to adhere to the established criteria, doesn't change that criteria. It only makes you wrong !!!

  12. #12
    Additional images can be found here: http://sfbay.craigslist.org/eby/wan/5278377005.html

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