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Thread: Ames m1833

  1. #1
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    Ames m1833

    Relic condition Ames m1833
    Total 39 1/8
    Blade 33 7/8
    Wide 1
    POB 7 1/4 from hilt
    Inspector WS on obverse quillion
    Hard to see markings missing grip.
    Attached Images Attached Images      
    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  2. #2
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    m1833 after a little work

    M1833 with a little elbow grease, Tom Nardi hilt and a tad of cleaning.
    United States clearly visible, Ames and date 1837 now visible. TW inspector mark obverse ricasso now visible. 1837 highest production year for Ames 4, 272 swords.
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    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  3. #3
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    Great job Eric.

  4. #4
    Very nice, Eric!

  5. #5
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    Thanks Glenn and J.G. I buy relic for price sometimes. Tom Nardi does a great jop on grips. Would love a 33 or 34 but hard to find. Eric
    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  6. #6
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    How does one clean a sword? Do you use a metal cleaning product? Does that harm the value like it does with antique coins?

  7. #7
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    John, you are asking a question that will get different answer from from most. I am a retired guy that collects swords in my interest group. To do that I study history in and out of my group as it relates to my swords. I care nothing for resale value only that metal, wood and leather parts look original as possible and are preserved. Is a Model T of more value (to you) rusting in your back yard or putting down the road with nice new japan black paint. It appears to me each different collecting group sets their on in group rules as antique cars (restored) antique coins (untouched). Although I have a few ship wreck coins that were cleaned so nothing is absolute. Is it a relic sword? Is it really oxidized but tight? Is it just a little stained? Is it one of 500? Is it one of 9,000? What is my personal skill level? Do I use oil and xxxx steel wool or metal rescue? Do I use metal rescue with steel wool or soak it over night? All a personal choice. There are some true historians and scholars on this forum and I am sure they have a different and more informed view. For me I want it to be returned to a usable service weapon as much as possible although some of my historical significant swords I do not touch. I have an Ames m1833 marked NC that I will not touch. Mostly because of my skill level. Your sword your choice. Right or wrong I hope I helped you with out telling you what to do or not do. Regards Eric
    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  8. #8
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    N. Starr second model m1812 War of 1812

    John, here are a few more examples of what I do. This ofcourse does not mean it is correct. Here is a recent purchase on the bay. Great find at very good price. Second model Starr 1812. Small HHP stamp which I believe is first Henry H. Perkins stamp. Relic condition but as I said genuine War of 1812 sword. I took it apart as it had active rust, put broken and loose leather on grip back in place. A regular jig saw puzzle.
    Total 39
    Blade 33 3/4
    Wide 1 3/8
    Thick 1/4
    POB 8 inches from hilt
    Typical S mark on tang
    P mark on bottom og guard and on ricasso
    Marked N. Starr
    HHP
    Because it is a War of 1812 I only removed active rust and dirt, waxed, made leather repairs and preserved. Regards Eric
    Attached Images Attached Images         
    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  9. #9
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    Two relic swords missing grips

    Both were severely rusted and missing grips. I replaced grips in two pieces so tang peen is undisturbed. First one kings head stamp on ricasso, _ose stamp on in side guard. Etched blade obverse eagle and typical US markings, reverse Honor and My Country. Poorly executed clip point. The other sword The much older blade is massive and 33 1/2 inches long.
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    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  10. #10
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    ANIX Solingen made

    One more a Solingen made french ANIX? It is marked IGB which I believe is Johann and Clemens Bögel of Solingen. I had blade only bought repro guard and pommel and carved, installed string and covered grip with leather. Not my best work but I do love the Napoleonic calvary swords made for other markets. The Spanish used this type sword in the early 19th century and while it may or may not have been used it is representative for my display on Spanish Colonial. Regards Eric
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    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Fairbanks View Post
    M1833 with a little elbow grease, Tom Nardi hilt and a tad of cleaning.
    United States clearly visible, Ames and date 1837 now visible. TW inspector mark obverse ricasso now visible. 1837 highest production year for Ames 4, 272 swords.
    Very nice sword Eric! Tom can do nice work.

  12. #12
    Wonderful thread and great work Eric, thanks for sharing!

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