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Thread: Is this a real jian or not? Is this ornamental?

  1. #1

    Is this a real jian or not? Is this ornamental?

    Hello everybody,
    I'm Andrea, I'm Italian and I'm new at this forum. I would ask if anybody can help me to identify this particular jian. A friend of my father gave him this sword as a gift. I found a lot of interesting discussions here about this type of swords and how to recognise if they are antique or not but I never seen on the internet a jian like this and I don't how hold it is.
    Here I post also some photos, but the quality is not so good...I will post new photos as soon as possible. I can say with certainty that the sword is very light and the blade is flexible.

    Thanks for your time!
    Attached Images Attached Images      

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Posts
    618
    it's either a modern taiji/Tai Chi/kungfu jian, or a modern decorative jian, either souvenir or for fengshui. Very light and flexible blade is common for both.

    Hard to say from the photos, but I'd say it's an older one, 20th century (1980s?).
    "In addition to being efficient, all pole arms were quite nice to look at." - Cherney Berg, A hideous history of weapons, Collier 1963.

  3. #3
    Thank you
    Now I don't have with me the sword but in a few days I will be able to post better photos and maybe it will be possible also translate the incision on the blade and the word on the scabbard ��

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    51
    On the blade (upside down in the photo)
    龙泉宝剑 (simplified) 龍泉寶劍 (traditional) in small script/ seal script
    "Long Quan Treasure Sword"

    On the scabbard 龙泉剑 / 龍泉劍 (Long Quan Sword)
    [Long Quan literally translate to "Dragon Spring", but its more of a place's name]
    the place is famous for jian so there are quite a few manufacturers, and based on the inscription
    there is no clue on the manufacturer.

    There was a imitation craze around 1980s to early 2000s, which a lot of swords
    could carry the branding but no quality assurance.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FehjXLSm58k

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6g9vUMGYb6Y
    Last edited by Jay Chang; 10-14-2015 at 09:29 AM.

  5. #5
    Thank you ��
    I have the sword with me now and it's clear that the quality is not so high, tomorrow I will post better photos ��

  6. #6
    ok here there are the photos
    http://dropcanvas.com/nvwnw

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Posts
    618
    I've seen worse. The knob at the end of the pommel is a threaded nut. If the end of the tang hasn't been hammered (peened), you should be able to unscrew this, and if it isn't glued in place, remove the hilt. Looking at the tang will tell you whether it's solidly made and safe to swing around, or whether it's a wall-hanger.
    "In addition to being efficient, all pole arms were quite nice to look at." - Cherney Berg, A hideous history of weapons, Collier 1963.

  8. #8
    Ok thank you
    I'll try but it seems that the handle is not removable, it's all fixed And at the end of the handle close to the guard there is a crack all the way around and I'm afraid to break everything :s

  9. #9
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