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Thread: Osborn horn grip eaglehead

  1. #1
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    Osborn horn grip eaglehead

    Have not got this one in hand as of yet but you just don't see the horn grip eagle head spadroons every day. Really needs a good cleaning but horn appears in great shape although blade needs serious attention. Early D guard type guard and appears to be true Osborn. Some are a little different and crude and as with many Ketland eagles are copies by other makers. I have a limited number of horn grip eagles so forgive my over zealous posting with out clean up and measurments. Rough as it is it was a good day. Eric
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    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  2. #2
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    Nice piece Eric

    Are there any signs that the blade had been decorated, or is it plain? I have a few horn grip weeper spadroons in files.

    I look at the Osborn, Bolton and Ketland as the Three Stooges, or the Holy Trinity I still lack a horn grip Bolton sabre. There are few other eagles I seek at this point but maybe stumbling on some of the American forms will find them following me home.

    Cheers

    Hotspur; My Osborn sabre was a wreck when I got it but fixed up pretty nice

    PS

    The difference in detail on these is mostly a matter of chasing (or little) after the castings.
    Last edited by Glen C.; 01-03-2016 at 10:30 PM.

  3. #3
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    Sorry to say on etching I just don't know. Nice horns are a rare treat for me and as of yet I have not figured out exactly how they were built. The detail and effect of line design on grip could only be acheived in a mold press. Which is a long way from simple pressed horn. I cannot replicate by carving. Do you know process used? I do love the unusual grips and have one Bolton with original cherry or at least period on a back sword. For collecting Ketlands being the most abundant, Osborn next so, Bolton's then the elusive Thurkle. For me the Bolton the most elegant. Eric
    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  4. #4
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    The horn grips are formed by steaming and pressing/embossing (per Hartzler, in a mold). i repaired a crack in one of mine with a mixture of ground coffee, shoe polish and superglue. There is a variation in colors and some more translucent than others. I would imagine the wood grips are also formed in the same manner, as embossed "carvings" are found on a lot of items even today.

    Cheers

    Hotspur; I have an Osborn, a Ketland and two of the cushion/urn type stirrup hilt swords.,

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Fairbanks View Post
    Have not got this one in hand as of yet but you just don't see the horn grip eagle head spadroons every day.
    Is it just eagle head spadroons on which horn grips are unusual, or are they scarce on other blade forms as well? I had not realized they were all that uncommon. I don't have a horn-gripped Osborne spadroon, but do have a fairly nice Osborne-style eagle head saber with horn grips. Dick

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  6. #6
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    The horn grips less common on eagles in general, as more targeted to lesser officers. Many more eagles of all types are bone or ivory.

    That's a nice pie crusted eagle there Richard. I target undecorated dark sabres and bone or ivory spadroons. To date on the Osborn spadroons, it seems about equal between white or dark grips but the Osborn spadroons less common than sabres.

    My horn grips below


    Cheers


    Hotspur; One also encounters hor grips on pistols from time to time.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glen C. View Post
    The horn grips less common on eagles in general, as more targeted to lesser officers. Many more eagles of all types are bone or ivory.

    That's a nice pie crusted eagle there Richard. I target undecorated dark sabres and bone or ivory spadroons. To date on the Osborn spadroons, it seems about equal between white or dark grips but the Osborn spadroons less common than sabres.
    Here are a couple horn-grip Bolton/Upson spadroons from my collection.

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    I also have a couple horn-grip tall pillow pommel sabers similar to the one in your post. Although these are usually identified as NCO swords, I suspect the one with the blue and gilt blade is a junior officer sword. Unfortunately, neither has a scabbard.

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  8. #8
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    Some truly beautiful girls gentleman. The Ketland and 5 ball Bolton complete stunners. Your m1790 NCO or rather Commissioned officer Richard also a rare beauty with blue and gold. Most are horn with the exception a cherry wood here and there. I do not run into many horn grip eagles and seem to see more Osborn than Ketland or Boltons for sure. The m1790s one of my favorite swords. I really enjoyed both your photos, and info on horn grip process. thanks Eric
    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

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    Glenn, does your book have photos of press molds? I have always believed that was the case and was glad to get your information. I am interested in how the molds were pieced and the material they were made from. The force or amount of hydrolic or weight pressure used. I know it is a long shot for someone to have details on manufacture but I have gotten no where looking for this info in library or on line. I am also very interested in any glues or bonding agents used in process. I am working on steamer for raw horn and have a machinist lined up to build mold but want to skip as much trial and error as I can. Thanks Eric
    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  10. #10
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    No picture of the molds and further detail of the process, just a single sentence.
    https://books.google.com/books?id=95_VCQAAQBAJ

    I would have to go through other books, as I am pretty sure it is addressed similarly in other texts (other Hartzler, Mowbray etc). I pulled the single reference off Google.

    btw This is one volume of two books Hartzler has recently had published. Both are on Google and Kindle but I'll likely buy the hardcover volumes.. Two big books of the stuff.
    Last edited by Glen C.; 01-07-2016 at 11:55 AM.

  11. #11
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    Thanks Glenn just looking for what I can find. Thanks for the help. Eric
    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

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    You got that at a good price Eric. Nice!!

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    Thanks Simon, I did get it at a very fair price but it needs a bit of work. It does pale in comparison to Glen's Ketland a much harder find and in great shape. Of course Richard's Boltons and expecially the 5 ball are certainly the cream on the eaglehead milk. I tend to see more Osborn horn than any of the other main eagles. I am not complaining it was a good day. Reguards Eric
    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  14. #14
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    Pierre (pcay) has a lovely frosty etched Osborn.

    I had picked up an Osborn spadroon/epee with bone Might be a composite. Lost the auction photos and I have been procrastinating in taking more pictures of it. I do have a couple. It has a German type blade.


    The horn Ketland I have was with its scabbard, which was a real plus.
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    Last edited by Glen C.; 01-12-2016 at 05:33 PM.

  15. #15
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    Your Bolton looks like a dandy. Is the grip ivory? Most of them I encounter are. The bolton design truly unique and attractive. Eric
    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  16. #16
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    Nope, my Bolton is bone. It was my first "old" eagle. The blade is quite dark but the etchings remain. It is a nice sturdy piece.
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glen C. View Post
    Nope, my Bolton is bone. It was my first "old" eagle. The blade is quite dark but the etchings remain. It is a nice sturdy piece.
    Here is a nice Bolton horn-grip similar to yours but with a slot-guard. For other shots see http://www.ebay.com/itm/American-Eag...QAAOSwOVpXfCTG. From the silver wash I would take it to be an infantry sword. I really like this style.

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    Last edited by Richard Schenk; 07-05-2016 at 11:52 PM.

  18. #18
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    Wow, missed that one. It is pretty much what I have been looking for, except it was a decorated blade. I'll have to add those pictures to the pile.

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