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Thread: Indian light cavalry sabre fakes

  1. #1
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    Indian light cavalry sabre fakes

    Hi

    I'd like to start looking for an Indian light cavalry sabre, i.e. The 1821 hilt with the 1796 blade.

    I've seen one offering but there was something about it which seemed off for some reason, even with my minimal experience. I can't find the site I found it on now to show images but it had some Indian script carved into one of brass 3 bar hilt. It's this normal or tourist tat?

    Does anyone have any advice on the frequency of reproductions or outright fakes out there and what to look for to avoid these?

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    Found the images

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    The hilt seems really poorly made especially in the backstrap with lots of what appears to my untrained eye to be imperfections in the casting process rather than damage.

    Also I was suspicious of the scripting on the hilt although can't put my finger on why. Perhaps I felt it too conveniently screams "I'm I am Indian cavalry sabre".

    As someone with a very new interest in antique sword collecting am I perhaps being too suspicious?

    Any observations welcomed and of interest.

  3. #3
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    Could be a locally-made sword for the troops of one of the native states - have you tried getting the inscription translated? If it says "made in India" I think we can assume it's a repro!
    "If I can't be a good example to others, at least let me be a horrible warning".

  4. #4
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    The one you are showing is the real McCoy . Here is mine



    Its quite common for their swords to carry script , also take a look at the spine of the blade by the riccaso as a lot of these swords are made up from British blades so look for an english maker .

    Here is another type with a local area cypher on the guard





    The expert on these swords is Gordon Byrne who is in the middle of writing a book on these
    Here is my pride and joy






  5. #5
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    The script on this one



    and mine



    is basicallywhat you will find on british troopers swords i:e regiment / troop / rack number

    Ours look to be from the same regiment

  6. #6
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    The photos James posted are from an active auction which is happening today.
    James, we're not supposed to post items related to current auctions.

  7. #7
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    Matt, thanks for pointing that it out, duly noted.

    I actually couldn't recall where I had seen the images when I first posted the thread and was initially after general advice only, but my fault for not checking the rules.

    John, good advice, I never thought to try to translate the script.

    Paul, thanks for those images, good to be set right about my concerns and those photos you've provided will be a great help when others come up for sale.

    I actually missed my chance to bid on the item in question because I spent too long trying to check which logistics carriers would carry swords without it contravening their prohibited items conditions. If anyone has advice on this, it would be appreciated.

    Regards

  8. #8
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    [QUOTE=

    is basicallywhat you will find on british troopers swords i:e regiment / troop / rack number

    Ours look to be from the same regiment[/QUOTE]


    Hi Paul,

    I've now acquired this sword so would be interested in any more information about yours or the others you mention in this post.

    Mine has no markings at all, other than the ones depicted on the hilt. Does your blade have maker's mark? Do you have any definitive information about which regiment used these markings?

    In an effort to narrow down the language I have Google researched the top 10-12 most spoken Indian languages and find that on the 3 swords pictured with rgmt : troop : rack number there are similarities to several Hindi scripts, mostly however Bengali, Devanagari and Gujarati as seen below, however none of them are an exact match in every case :

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    If we assume the markings are to indicate Regiment : troop : rack number then the closest matches would be as follows making yours troop 1 rack no. 80.

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    I am totally at a loss as to the meaning of the mark closest to the blade, I can't find reference to it anywhere in numerals or alphabet of the most common Indian scripts.

    In addition the script on the sword with the 'cypher' on the back strap appears to have no similarities to either Bengali, devanagari or Gujarati and has more in common with urdu.

    I am no language expert however and the above is all simply from my interpretation of Google searches so it could all be rubbish.

    Would be great to I.D. the regiment.

    Regards
    James
    Last edited by james.elstob; 04-16-2016 at 06:16 PM.

  9. #9
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    Hi James

    Don't know if you are UK based or not but in answer to your enquiry about carriers. British Parcel Force will carry swords without restrictions as they do not class them as "weapons" per se. I have used them and have received swords through the post over the years without any problem (rechecked with them a month ago and had a sword delivered last week). The main criteria they insist on is that the sword is packed securely enough to avoid injury to their staff. A cork on the point taped to secure it and bubble wrap. Put the sword in a stout cardboard tube (available from packaging companies) and make sure you insure it from getting "lost" in the post and Bobs' yer Uncle!

    Neil T

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