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Thread: Kris knife

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    3

    Kris knife

    I needed some help identifying a kris knife and I was wondering if it has any value as an antique. My grandfather visited Indonesia during the 1950s to 1960s and I am guessing this is when he came into possession of this knife. I wanted to know if it is antique so I could keep it in the shape it is or if it is more common so I could restore it.

    http://imgur.com/a/hLZRS

    Here is the link for the pictures. Let me know if you need higher quality or different angles.

    Thank you for any help and have a nice day.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Posts
    618
    Yes, yes, and yes. Looks antique, antique keris are pretty common, and you can restore it.

    Clean off rust. Re-stain.Done! (Might be useful to google for "staining keris".)
    "In addition to being efficient, all pole arms were quite nice to look at." - Cherney Berg, A hideous history of weapons, Collier 1963.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    3
    I was looking at the staining and it is asking for arsenic. The forums I am looking at are saying it's illegal without a special licenses in the USA. Do you know of any other way to stain it?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Posts
    618
    Ferric chloride should to work, and is supposed to be not too difficult. Less contrast than arsenic, but I've seen blades stained this way that looked OK. Never tried it myself.

    Apparently one can also use sulphur + salt + rice water but this is much harder to get right (and makes the keris stink).
    "In addition to being efficient, all pole arms were quite nice to look at." - Cherney Berg, A hideous history of weapons, Collier 1963.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    3
    Thanks for the help. I have one more question. I have sharpened it and removed most of the rust. However these spots that are in these pictures (http://imgur.com/a/JH6WZ) have been extremely difficult. First, I soaked it in vinegar for a few days and put it in clorox after to neutralize the vinegar so it didn't damage the blade. This did not do much to these spot and then I used 0000 steel wool and wd40. It was way too light so I went up to 0 and eventually 2 and it still did not work. I have been using a diamond studded file to try to get it off but it still takes about 15 to 20 minutes to scrape it off. Is there any easier way? I have been scratching the area around the spots and it is getting a little ridiculous.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
    Posts
    618
    I would have expected vinegar to work. Perhaps there is grease or similar in those rust spots? Maybe some solvent or grease/oil-remover might help. Otherwise, I can't think of anything beyond what you're already doing.
    "In addition to being efficient, all pole arms were quite nice to look at." - Cherney Berg, A hideous history of weapons, Collier 1963.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    583
    I know I am way late on this, but the Balinese use arsenic in their etch. This type of keris is not Balinese so arsenic will not be needed. It looks more Bugis to me.

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