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Thread: Help with ID: Civil War Sword?

  1. #1

    Help with ID: Civil War Sword?

    Any help with identifying or getting info on this sword would be much appreciated. We inherited this and don't have any info on it. It does have a moveable metal part, as if to unlatch a piece that was once attached. It is 20" long with the handle making up 4.5" of the length. Thank you for your time and knowledge in advance.
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Birmingham Alabama
    Posts
    1,395
    Skye: You have a Japanese type 30 bayonet, made in approx. 1943. The maker is Hikari Seiki under the supervision of Kokura Arsenal. The three ring sign is Kokura, the other is a stylized prism, a trade mark of Hikari Seiki, a maker of optical devices. During WW 2, the Japanese had several makers of Bayonets and Rifles to supplement their production of materiel. This bayonet would fit the Type 30,38,97, and 99 Rifles and Carbines, in addition it would also fit the Type 97 and 99 Light Machine Guns.

    All of this information is here in concise form: http://www.lawranceordnance.com/info...0_bayonets.php

    Dale

  3. #3
    Thank you so much. This makes a lot of sense as my husband's great uncle was a Colonel in the Airforce during WWII and stationed in Japan. He collected many things from Japan during that time and after the war. My father in law was also a WWII collector. Thanks again.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Birmingham Alabama
    Posts
    1,395
    Skye: No problem, these are actually very well made bayonets. Just clean this one up with some oil and a soft cloth, anything else would reduce the value..

    Dale

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    105
    And worth about double or triple what a regular WW2 bayonet is valued at.

  6. #6
    Very interesting. It is not something that my husband and I appreciate so I think we are going to stick it up on eBay so that someone can enjoy having it in their collection. Why store something that someone else could enjoy? Really cool piece of American history though. Thanks for the help.

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