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Thread: South Indian chilanum

  1. #1

    South Indian chilanum

    The dagger shown is a South Indian chilanum 16th century.
    The pommel final is in brass, and forms a sculptural composition that shows twim, opposing birds in a stylised form. The re-curved blade is riveted to the hilt.
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    The weapons are literally tapestries of culture.
    Jim McDougall

  2. #2
    I think that I'll need to see more photos in order to be really jealous

  3. #3
    Alll right, here is a detail of the hilt.
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    The weapons are literally tapestries of culture.
    Jim McDougall

  4. #4
    I've never seen one quite like it Jens.
    Lovely form, congratulations.
    Crystalline wootz blade?

  5. #5
    I never did anything to the blade, and yes, it is fine wootz.
    Notice that the two birds have their heads turned backwards like often seen.
    The weapons are literally tapestries of culture.
    Jim McDougall

  6. #6
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    A beautiful example, chilanum are very elegant daggers.


  7. #7
    There is something particularly attractive about the depictions of birds in Mughal art.
    What is the overall length Jens?

  8. #8
    Total length 35 cm. Length of blade 24 cm.
    Shown in my catalogue A Passion for Indian Arms pp. 79-80.
    The weapons are literally tapestries of culture.
    Jim McDougall

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens Nordlunde View Post
    Total length 35 cm. Length of blade 24 cm.
    Shown in my catalogue A Passion for Indian Arms pp. 79-80.
    Jens, I just looked up this chilanum in your book, as usual once I started looking I couldnt stop. Great info on this particular style. How is it possible that you even have any of your books left unsold????

    Here is my rather worn and old chilanum, purchased from Runjeet with his description.


  10. #10
    Eric,
    I dont know if the catalogue is sold out, as I have not been in contact with the seller for quite some time, and I know he is busy, so I wont press him.
    Did you know that the two 'hooks' under the langets are stylized bird heads? Sometimes you see then, and sometimes you need to know they are there to see them.
    Like with the khanjarli sometimes you see the elephants/yarlis, and sometimes you only see two holes.
    The weapons are literally tapestries of culture.
    Jim McDougall

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jens Nordlunde View Post
    Did you know that the two 'hooks' under the langets are stylized bird heads? Sometimes you see then, and sometimes you need to know they are there to see them.
    Like with the khanjarli sometimes you see the elephants/yarlis, and sometimes you only see two holes.
    Jens, I remember you mentioning this subject before, and I do look for "unseen" images. As for the langet hooks, I did not realize that these were birds heads. I do see birds on the hilt of your chilanum, much easier to spot them.

    Last edited by eric t; 06-25-2017 at 09:28 PM.

  12. #12
    Have a look at this hilt. It is from Robert Hales book Islamic and Oriental Arms and Armour no 144.
    Here the birds can clearly be seen. Sometimes a dragon or Yali head can be seen, but not so often.
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    The weapons are literally tapestries of culture.
    Jim McDougall

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