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Thread: Better places for buying swords

  1. #1

    Better places for buying swords

    Hi all!
    In your opinions, where better buy price/quality swords? Internet places, ebay? Ebay is safely places for buying? I think on ebay more fakes and for beginner is not good😀

    Thanks!

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by edwardauskis View Post
    Hi all!
    In your opinions, where better buy price/quality swords? Internet places, ebay? Ebay is safely places for buying? I think on ebay more fakes and for beginner is not good

    Thanks!


    I take it that you are not in the UK because here we cannot buy/sell on Ebay and soon will not be able to post swords to private residences.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by william.m View Post
    I take it that you are not in the UK because here we cannot buy/sell on Ebay and soon will not be able to post swords to private residences.
    Are swords caught up in the new proposals (specifically antiques)?

  4. #4
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    Hi Edward,

    I think it’s very risky to buy antiques on-line. Probably safer to buy from the more reputable auction houses. If you can, probably even better to examine the objects before buying in antiques shops. The latter is more time consuming.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Magnus K View Post

    Probably safer to buy from the more reputable auction houses.
    Agree. And I would recommend Swedish auctions houses like Probus and Stockholms auktionsverk; they have honest experts and reasonably good pictures. I have been a customer at almost all major auctions houses in the world, and I would place those two in the top. Bruun Rasmussen is also good, but it is nightmare to get edged weapons out of Denmark.
    But small auctions can be worse than ebay.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by IMoran View Post
    Are swords caught up in the new proposals (specifically antiques)?
    We don't know yet. If it all goes ahead as the government wants though, I would be amazed if they excluded swords from the new legislation. They are doing their best to make it very difficult for knife collectors and users (like me) and outright banning even owning many things in our homes. I fully expect non-traditionally made curved swords to become illegal to posses. You probably know at the moment we can still keep them at home if we got them before the purchase ban.

    I've written to my MP (not much use) and done the online consultation 'survey' but that is rigged by the wording of it.
    When offered a spoon, one should not cling to one's fork. The soup will get cold.

  7. #7
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    Who is behind these proposals to ban swords in the UK? Do the police and law enforcing agencies support it? Are there any historical precedents? I understand in medieval times the king had to enforce new laws that only the nobility had the right to carry swords?

    I think there may be legacy legal issues in the Middle East with swords? I heard someone had his cheap reproduction decorative wallhangers/swords made in India stopped and confiscated in Beirut customs, who invoked some ancient Ottoman era laws concerning swords. The poor owner had to go to court to get repossession of these “swords” which had negligible value. The irony is that the legal authorities vasted their efforts on these wallhangers when presumably there are much more dangerous arms at large in Lebanon.

  8. #8
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    It's a completely political stunt by the government, but working on the same thrust they have had for years. Stopping the public owning anything potentially dangerous. Yes, the police fully support it, at least the management does. Oddly, many of the tools (Leatherman-style multitools) carried regularly by police officers who actually work might well be outlawed if things go poorly. I'm sure they will ignore it, like they already do. If we carried them the way they do it would be a criminal offence, and the tools are not part of issued kit and police are not exempt from the law. Anyway...

    The gov are using the excuse that police cannot do anything if they find a 'weapon' (i.e. many knives and certain swords) in someone's house, so they want them making illegal to possess.

    The swords that will be caught in this are curved swords >50cm in length and not of traditional, hand-made construction, and anything that the gov. terms a 'zombie' weapon. That includes those knives and modern swords sold as such, and any with a green handle! That last bit is utterly absurd, but that is the law!

    Zombies need protection from us law-abiding knife collectors!

    At the moment we are seeing increasing reports of any knife-related crime on the news, and reports form the gov. of the increasing violent crime rates (which they normally play down). So, when the bill becomes law the gov. can say 'look what we are doing about it!' Perhaps one cause of increasing violent crime is the fact that we have the lowest number of serving police since the '80's, and they are being prevented by policy from enforcing many laws so as not to cause 'racial tension' and similar.

    It's all smoke and mirrors... so-called 'knife' crime gets any violent crime with any sharp or pointed implement lumped in, so screwdrivers, chisels, etc all become 'knives'. Also, statistics show that the vast majority of knives used in crime are kitchen knives, which will still be taken from kitchens and stolen from the corner shop as usual.

    The final results will be an increase in arrests and prosecutions, probably including a large number of people who simply collect knives and use them as tools, as opposed to actual criminals. That and a large number of seized and surrendered 'weapons' from us which will be flaunted on the TV news. That will show how well the government has done and get more votes from the 'middle England' voters they are aiming for.

    ETA: and if all of that sounds very cynical, it's realistic. I've watched our government use the exact same tactics for decades. This is just the latest instalment.
    Last edited by Rick Fox; 10-21-2017 at 05:01 AM.
    When offered a spoon, one should not cling to one's fork. The soup will get cold.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Magnus K View Post
    Hi Edward,

    I think it’s very risky to buy antiques on-line. Probably safer to buy from the more reputable auction houses. If you can, probably even better to examine the objects before buying in antiques shops. The latter is more time consuming.
    I wouldn’t put too much faith in most of the major US auction houses either. I am appalled how often you see faulty or down-right phony items listed as genuine with high pre-sale estimates. Sometimes this is the result of honest ignorance on the part of the folks preparing the catalog, but too often it is intentional deception. I have sometimes written to the Houses to point out the problems with one item or another. Usually my warning is ignored, but other times I get a not-too-polite response that they are experts and know what they are doing. I have never seen a fraudulent item withdrawn or the description modified to reflect the questions about it. Sometimes you can tell the auction house knows it’s selling a phony by the way they weasel-word the description to protect themselves in event there is blowback. A prime example was earlier this year when a prominent house listed a well-known reproduction of an 1862-dated M1861 officer’s cutlass made by the infamous House of Swords back in the 1980s, and assigned it a pre-sale estimate of $2000-3000. It was a good quality repro which could fool many. I know they were not fooled, however. Not only did I provide them with the chapter and verse on this cutlass, but clearly the catalogers recognized the problems with this sword. They described it as "an 1862 style cutlass", not an 1862 cutlass, with the disclaimer that the "actual date of manufacture unknown". They also noted "original examples are...very scarce", but they don't say this was an original example. The cutlass failed to meet the pre-sale estimate, but it did bring in almost $1.5K. If genuine, this would have been an unbelievable bargain, but it is grossly more than it was worth as a modern repro. Caveat Emptor. The only way to really protect yourself is educate yourself on the items in which you have an interest, study the reference words, examine as many examples as possible, and, whenever feasible, examine the item in person as Magnus recommends.
    Last edited by Richard Schenk; 10-21-2017 at 08:49 PM.

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