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Thread: Best Acquisition of 2017

  1. #1
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    Best Acquisition of 2017

    OK Gents,

    It is time for the Best acquisition of 2017 thread. Post your best sword find of this year. It does not have to be the most expensive or rarest item but it does have to be your favorite find for 2017.

    My best find is a Model 1871 US Public Health Service Officer sword along with USPHS accouterments. This non-combatant Commissioned Officer medical service sword morphed from the Marine Hospital Service founded in 1798 into the Public Health Service in 1912. A scarce sword that I have long kept a lookout for.
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    "You can't please everyone, so you have to please yourself." Ricky Nelson

  2. #2
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    Can we keep this thread open until after Christmas?

  3. #3
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    I think my last adopted would be my most serendipitous. There were a couple of others but they are somehow a bit mundane and common to me.

    Recently acquired, a pre Mexican War Ames. Etched blade and a brass scabbard. The older guard casting very reminiscent of the Portsmouth Artillery example we see in Peterson and Hamilton's history of Ames. With an NP Ames Springfield address, this one is pretty early. The 25" etched blade sports a crossed sword and quiver under a spread eagle with E Pluribus Unum, with the obverse etched with a tall liberty pole with flags. Some minor dents and a crack in the brass scabbard but it is all there. The pommel is 180 degrees backwards in these dealer pictures. I'll take some more pictures in time.









    Like so many best offers, it doesn't hurt to take a chance on ebay. This was definitely a case where my expectations have been exceeded. This is now another terrific addition to my collection of mostly Ames examples. A second with a metal scabbard and a third with the scallop guard langet. Merry Christmas to me, I can't see I'll afford something else before then.

    Cheers

    GC

  4. #4
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    Glen,

    A very neat early Ames. I see why it is your favorite.

    Magnus,

    Yes, we certainly can keep this thread open until you open up your Christmas packages from Santa.
    "You can't please everyone, so you have to please yourself." Ricky Nelson

  5. #5
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    My favorite acquisition this year is a Springfield Armory M1872 Cavalry Officer’s saber. This is the earlier version which Kellerstadt characterized as the “heavy variant”, and which Farrington has now identified as the original M1872 Cavalry sword which was adopted for use just by cavalry officers. In 1880 it was replaced by a lighter and slightly modified “Field and Cavalry Officers” pattern 1880 sword. The pattern 1880, which is also commonly referred to as the M1872, was intended for use not only by cavalry officers, but by all mounted officers. Aside from the heavier weight, the most obvious difference is the blade, which is about 7/8th inch wide, 1/8th inch wider than the 1880 pattern, and has a stopped wide fuller whereas the 1880 pattern had an unstopped fuller. This original M1872 Cavalry Officer sword is quite rare. Less than 110 were made, 103 of which were made in 1876. I had been looking for one for years, so I was quite surprised to find it listed in an auction catalog described only as a garden-variety M1872 with no mention of it being a Springfield, much less the heavy variant. I was absolutely amazed, but pleasantly so, that apparently no one else recognized it for what it was and I obtained it for a song. If anyone knows of another example posted somewhere, I'd appreciate the link.

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    Last edited by Richard Schenk; 12-07-2017 at 04:05 PM.

  6. #6
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    Love those etched Ames militia blades! Very nice Glen!

  7. #7
    I've picked up some great swords this year but I think this is my favorite.

    Presentation Ames Civil War Pattern 1852 Naval Officers’ Sword and Scabbard from the President & Director of the Southern Steamship Co to Cape Cod Sea Captain Rodney Baxter.

    This is an exceptional example of a Ames 1852 Naval Officers’ sword. The guard, in addition to the standard pattern motifs, contains chased floral designs around the pommel cap and around the inside branch. The black leather scabbard mounts also contains additional engraved decorations that include an eagle clutching arrows on the top mount and oak leaves and acorns on the bottom. Additionally each mount contains leaf engraved boarders. The inscription on the reverse of the top scabbard mount reads, Presented to CAPt RODNEY BAXTER of the STEAMSHIP So. CAROLINA by the President & Director of the Southern Steamship Co May 1861. The blade is etched on each side with the standard Ames pattern naval motifs. Rodney Baxter was Captain of the Steamship South Carolina and when she was sold to the Navy, he was commissioned an Acting Master and remained onboard. He only served from May 1861 to October 1861. He then when on to captain the U.S. Steam Transport Mississippi. His most famous passenger being General Butler.
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    Last edited by GC Roxbury; 12-08-2017 at 01:29 PM.

  8. #8
    A few more pictures
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  9. #9
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    I'd have to say the F.W. Beville sword made by Wilkinson in 1910 with 7th Hussars grip though I have a couple last minute swords arriving soon.
    One a 1822p British infantry sword with double sided blade and a 1912p 6th Dragoon Guards cavalry officer sword.
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Will Mathieson View Post
    I'd have to say the F.W. Beville sword made by Wilkinson in 1910 with 7th Hussars grip though I have a couple last minute swords arriving soon.
    One a 1822p British infantry sword with double sided blade and a 1912p 6th Dragoon Guards cavalry officer sword.
    Now Will! I know it is like deciding which one of your children you will put in the will first but it is your choice so you must make it.
    "You can't please everyone, so you have to please yourself." Ricky Nelson

  11. #11
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    M1861 Sharp and Hamilton

    While mine is a tad ugly it is in my mind my best of the year although I find my self on Will's team not so sure as I too like them all. I will however follow Coach George's rule as hard as it is. This has to be my pick as it is rare and unusual. Early war unmarked but unmistakable with brass and steel furniture. Later they used their company name Nasville Plow Works but early on just Sharp and Hamilton. 35 1/4 inch blade and 40 3/4 over all. My pick of my liter.
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    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  12. #12
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    That is quite a find Eric. I also learned something new about Nashville Plow Works!.

    Cheers

    GC

  13. #13
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    I'm impressed. I don't do Confederate - I have neither the money nor expertize for them, but I really appreciate them. This one in particular seems to fit with your primary passion of early Federal - the grips look like they could have come right off a Starr. Where did you find this one? I can't recall it on any of the usual sites/vendors.
    Last edited by Richard Schenk; 12-09-2017 at 08:50 PM.

  14. #14
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    George I believe I did say: "I'd have to say the F.W. Beville sword made by Wilkinson in 1910" The others are runners up.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by GC Roxbury View Post
    I've picked up some great swords this year but I think this is my favorite.

    Presentation Ames Civil War Pattern 1852 Naval Officers’ Sword and Scabbard from the President & Director of the Southern Steamship Co to Cape Cod Sea Captain Rodney Baxter.

    This is an exceptional example of a Ames 1852 Naval Officers’ sword. The guard, in addition to the standard pattern motifs, contains chased floral designs around the pommel cap and around the inside branch. The black leather scabbard mounts also contains additional engraved decorations that include an eagle clutching arrows on the top mount and oak leaves and acorns on the bottom. Additionally each mount contains leaf engraved boarders. The inscription on the reverse of the top scabbard mount reads, Presented to CAPt RODNEY BAXTER of the STEAMSHIP So. CAROLINA by the President & Director of the Southern Steamship Co May 1861. The blade is etched on each side with the standard Ames pattern naval motifs. Rodney Baxter was Captain of the Steamship South Carolina and when she was sold to the Navy, he was commissioned an Acting Master and remained onboard. He only served from May 1861 to October 1861. He then when on to captain the U.S. Steam Transport Mississippi. His most famous passenger being General Butler.
    That is a beauty! Where did you find it?

  16. #16
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    I don't do a lot of Confederate but I do have some. Richard hit it right on the head many of the Grays swords I have are connected to the Federal period or look Federal. Glen my main focus is early American made, it always amazes me the lengths, efforts, tricks and deals different American companies went through to compete. They did not have skilled workers so they imported Germans, they had their British cousin or brother get it made,hilted a Solingen blade and shipped to them or they just hammered it out the best they could. Plow steel is very similar to sword steel. Eric
    Last edited by Eric Fairbanks; 12-10-2017 at 05:47 AM.
    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  17. #17
    It came from a antique dealer in Mass. He deals in coins and some swords and military. I was lucky to get a call on it.

  18. #18
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    Lt. Col. James McCaul Hagart

    Mine has just been bought with only 2 days left of 2017...Lt. Col. James McCaul Hagart's 7th Hussars Sword as mentioned in General Sir James Hope Grant's book...complete with damaged hilt!

    And of course, as mentioned in Richard Dellar's wonderful book "The British Cavalry Sword 1788-1912: Some New Perspectives"

    It is a well known sword, so probably no need to repeat the history of it...needless to say I am 'over the moon'
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  19. #19
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    Afghani pulowar.

    Wanted one for some time, too cheap to win at auction-- until this year.

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  20. #20
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    These are some really nice swords! It looks like our little band of sword collectors did well last year. Choosing just one sword is always hard for me but it seems to help me put things in perspective.

    If you have not contributed yet, please feel free to do so. I love seeing the goodies others have acquired over the year.

    George
    "You can't please everyone, so you have to please yourself." Ricky Nelson

  21. #21
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    As we are limited to swords, then this is probably my best acquisition of the year, though a rather nice Kukri I got my hands on would be my runner up. An 1845 pat volunteer rifles officers sword, which has been restored, but non the worse for that. Name:  overall.jpg
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  22. #22
    Hi David R,

    Could you possibly elaborate on the guard type, and does this sword have a makers name.

  23. #23
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    Best Buys of 2017?

    I had a great 2017 picking up a choice 1853 Guards pattern officers sword to the Governor Generals Foot Guards and an odd Canadian 1892 Infantry Officers Sword with a George V cypher on the blade. I'm still trying to figure it out and I'll post it in a separate thread.

    Greg
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  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by gordon byrne View Post
    Hi David R,

    Could you possibly elaborate on the guard type, and does this sword have a makers name.
    Posted with a lot more detail here....


    http://www.swordforum.com/forums/sho...5-Rifles-sword

  25. #25
    Thanks David R, did you eventually identify the maker as apposed to the merchant who sold it?

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