Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Request identification of knives / daggers / bayonets

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Silkeborg, Denmark
    Posts
    21

    Request identification of knives / daggers / bayonets

    Hi all,

    A have bought a few items, and some i don't know what are.. can you perhaps help me?

    Thanks a lot.

    1. Two knives - are these trench knives, and are they from WWII. One is marked Puma Solingen and the other one A. Storz, Marienplatz.

    2. A very slim dagger in a brass scabbard. German?

    3.Two "Plug bayonets"... i think i found out, that the first one is not a plug bayonet, but a Spanish knife? .. but i think the other one is. A sign on the first one sais "England 1645" but i guess that is wrong. Any ideas on both of these?? .. Thanks.

    Best regards
    Morten.
    Attached Images Attached Images      

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    North West US
    Posts
    1,142
    The first two are I believe German hunting knives the third one and last ones are Spanish albacete daggers. There seems to be quite a bit on them on the net. The type was made for a long time and I imagine still is. Dating them can be difficult for me perhaps one the the Spanish forum Gentleman can date yours correctly. Eric
    Last edited by Eric Fairbanks; 01-15-2018 at 09:54 AM. Reason: German does not have a Z.
    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  3. #3
    The one marked 'anno 1645 England' is Spanish, as confirmed by Eric.
    These are sometimes classified as (Punal) 'type B' (as opposed to 'type A' which are their single edged broad bladed cousins).
    They are often attributed to maritime use (Somewhat fancifully IMHO).
    They are not of course plug bayonets.
    Yours has the usual bone and brass grip. The blade on yours is on the long side for these.

    They are often also claimed to the manufacturing centre of Albacete.
    This is a bit generic and they are more widely spread, including copies made in far flung locations where Spanish influence is strong like the Philippines.

    I have one with ivorine grips and an etched blade with 'Toledo' on it.
    I would date yours to a similar period as my 'type B' below.
    They seem to have some age, but show signs of machining. I'd guess late 19th to early 20thC.
    The last knife with the black grip doesn't follow the style and construction of these.
    Attached Images Attached Images   
    Last edited by Gene Wilkinson; 01-15-2018 at 11:55 PM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Silkeborg, Denmark
    Posts
    21
    Thank you very much Gene for the detailed description.
    Do you have any idea what they are Selling for there days.

    Thanks.

    Best regards
    Morten

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Michigan, USA
    Posts
    912
    Morten. The others are correct, the first are German hunting for decorative wear not for use. In the 1950's both types were advertised in outdoor magazines for a few dollars. I had one of the staghorn models and had to be careful because the tang was so thin you could easily snap the handle off.

    Having never seen one like the second one with the brass scabbard my guess is that it is from a sword/dagger cane, with the cane missing, retrofitted with a brass scabbard. Regards, Rob
    "Ancora imparo - Michelangelo Buonarotti"

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Madrid, Spain
    Posts
    1,426
    Hello,

    Very little to add to the rest of contributions. Only that Albacete daggers were made up to the 1950's, but these later post-Civil War artifacts are in fact reproductions of the originals, the handle made in some plastic material resembling bone, and normally they lack for a real edge.

    Yours seem to be from late 19th, early 20th, but quite often these traditional styles are very difficult to date, since they were made for long periods of time with only minor changes.

    The last one does not seem Spanish, or at least not traditional.

    Best,
    JJ
    SI, SI
    NO, NON

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •