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Thread: Some advice sought on a sabre.

  1. #1
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    Some advice sought on a sabre.

    Hello all, this rather neglected old fellow found his way onto my doorstep this week.
    It was hanging loosely together so I took it apart and cleaned the rust from the blade with varying grades of steel wool and am pleased see it as being in better condition than I thought it would be. I've gone as far as I think is necessary and will concentrate on putting it back together when I have some spare time.
    It is quite a robust sword 31.5 inches (80cm) overall, with a 26.5 inch (67 cm) x 1.5 inch (4 cm) wide blade, reminiscent of the late 19th C. flank officers swords. I suppose that it would be termed a horseman's sword rather than a hanger. I'm not convinced that the grip is the original one.
    I'd be grateful to hear from anyone who has any thoughts on its nationality, or recognises it as a particular pattern.

    Mel.
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    Last edited by Mel H; 06-02-2018 at 08:56 AM.

  2. #2
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    The grip seems to be a rather generic later 20th century German bowie knife grip. The blade length is kind of short to be regarded a horseman's pattern and the whole may be a composite of several parts. The stirrup and backstrap seem to belong with each other, while the grip and blade added on from the parts bin.

    Cheers
    GC

    ps
    the tang of the blade appears to have been added to, supporting a composite build all around.

  3. #3
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    I would agree the horn grip appears more Red Stag than white tail or mule deer. The guard and pommel I am not familiar with although I have seen them on early 19th or earlier swords. The blade looks more British with the wide fuller and styling, very similar to British made 1790 NCOs and some eaglehead sabers. The NCOs came in 3 that I know of blade types and possibly more. Small top fuller on what I believe early ones, then the wide British made fullers and then what I believe the 19th century medium fullers. Many NCOs are shorter blades so a possibility I would think. Possibly a seamans composite, or Southern or personal protection who knows. I see nothing in design or construction to lead me to believe Spanish colonial or Mexican. With grip being the question I would lean towards mid 19th composite or a tad earlier. Of course I have seen modern composites of great ability. Is the added tip of tang welded or forged? That would be your answer. Eric
    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  4. #4
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    Glen, Eric, thanks for the thoughts, the grip is certainly wrong, the Blade does have a British look, I was hoping someone would recognise the hilt. It came from an established old collection and has probably been together for a long time, I'll reassemble it when I get some time and just leave it as it has been. Looking closely at the tang I don't think it has been lengthened but it is a little strange because someone has at some some past used a fine saw to cut a slit into it, probably in order to prise it apart at the end to make it a tighter fit into the pommel of the backstrap.

  5. #5
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    Mel the hilt looks like some of the late 18th French calvary swords.
    http://www.encheres-nantes-labaule.c...lotte-a-longue
    and also like some of the 1788 british pattern light calvary.
    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  6. #6
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    Hi Eric, the similarity to the 1788 Light Cavalry hilt did occur to me, I've seen a fair few variations over the years but I can't recollect seeing a crossguard finial quite like this one on a British sword. I have a fair selection of unidentified bits and pieces and it'll join them in the cupboard.
    Mel.

  7. #7
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    It looks like the quillion final on a cup hilt.
    The unlimited power of the sword is not in the hands of either the federal or state governments, but, where I trust in God it will ever remain, in the hands of the people." --- Tench Coxe

  8. #8
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    Hungarian hilts of the hussar type often exhibit the balls on quillions but certainly not limited to that country. I have a composite (using a smallsword shard) which uses what might have been of the rapier era. Or maybe a Latin flavor.

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    Off topic but thinking of balls is a seven baller which certainly must predate a lot of the trend. Kabeled as Polish, this one.

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    With a ball on the quillion as well ^^^^^^^

    Then the much later hilts. This one found on a lot of this eagle type.

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    So ya, maybe eastern Europe. Here another Polish ball quillion.
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    Cheers
    GC

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