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Thread: Confessions of a bladesmith; secrets revealed! (Finished Pictures added)

  1. #101
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    wow, thats amazing.. i wish you had taken pictures of the leafing bit, but its okay. i'm sure someone will take a picture of ti eventually... i don't want to bug al any more about my sword. i'd like to see the progress of it, but i'd lieke to let him keep his secrets.

    as for your work, if i had any money, i'd have to buy some of course, i'd also have to buy a display case for it, and a lock... and never touch it...
    I like swords.

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  2. #102
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    Re: Difference Damascus and patterned welded

    Sorry I noticed that there were some questions from when we last left this thread that I did not notice. I need to keep up with things and get this thread in order before this weekend (Feb, 8-9) since I am leaving to teach my Intro to blademisting class for two weeks.

    Originally posted by wade byron
    .... are patterned welded blades ideal for combat, or are the just more pleaseing to the eye. I'm just wondering because of the use of all these different metals, if they weaken the structural integrity of sword.
    If welded properly there should be no difference in the performance. Indeed, as I have mentioned in other posts, I have tested my steel and have found no real discernable difference between it and monosteel, until it is etched.


    Also, what is the difference between Damascus and pattern welded blades. Which one is stronger or should i say...hold up to the rigors of combat.
    Many folks today can be quite anal about refering to pattern welded steel as "damascus steel" Pattern welding is the mechanical manipulation of many fused layers of steel to produce patterns. The politically correct defintition of "damascus steel" is a high carbon crucible steel known as wootz (among other names) that derives its pattern from carbide segregation. I am a heretic, in that I am not a believer in the indestructable superiority of wootz. Whereas it did have a very high carbon content in a homogeneously fine steel when caompared to other steels of it's time, today it is just a ultra-high carbon steel with some funky carbide things going on.

    Strength is totaly relative to what you are looking for a blade to do. If strong = not breaking, then mild steel or even bronze will out perform most steels. But we need to think of edge holding, impact strength (much more important IMHO than whether it will bend), tensile strength, yeild points, failure points etc... This is quickly becoming a different thread topic


    And what kind of metal is O2. I've never heard of it. Thanks alot, you've done a great job with this thread and i'm looking forward to the rest.
    O2 was the beautiful little sister to O1 that didn't have all of those other nasty elements added. It was a simple tool steel of .9%C, 1.6%Mn, and .25%Si. It hardened nice and deep, welded beautifully to L6 and etched black as a moonless night due to all that Mn.

    But alas industry didn't need O2 as much as a couple of us discriminating bladesmiths did so it is a discontinued steel
    I have a small stock pile left that I only use in the the most dire of times when I need an effect in the pattern that I cannot get any other way.

  3. #103
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    One thing that I forgot to mention on the forging is the creation of a good template. With regular, straight tapering swords it is not always necessary, but with a different shape, like the leaf, I always try to plan out what the thing should look like and transfer it to a template. I can then hold the hot steel up to this pattern while I work in order to stay on track with the original concept. I find this very important with curves. Curves can ad grace and beauty to a blade like nothing else, if done correctly. Or they can just look awful and silly if not done in the right proportions. I do not exaggerate here, I will spend hours sometimes drawing and redrawing the correct curve ratios until I find one that is a balance of accent and flow. I must be honest that I have seen many curvaceous blades that I just thought were ugly as sin because the maker didn’t take the time to get the right proportions.

    So I designed and printed out a pattern and then transferred it to a sheet metal template that I could lay next to my forge.



    This does help but it also points out some of the compromises that one must make in the process. My original concept had the shoulders of the blade below the guard almost as wide as the wider leaf portion, but a certain amount of side compression is necessary to fuse the bars solid in the welding and this can limit how wide things can then get in the forging out. This was not a problem in the flair near the tip since that portion was going to be hammered out thinner and wider for the distal taper and the edges. But near the guard is where I will be ending the edges and thickening into a ricasso area before entering the guard. So It has to stay thick and this limits my widening ability. So you can see here is a compromise from the original concept.
    Last edited by Kevin R. Cashen; 02-05-2003 at 06:50 AM.

  4. #104
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    The Anneal

    Now that I have forged and done my normalizing to even out the internal structure of the steel from all of the abuse I have just layed on it, as well as a few trips through Ac1 to get the grain size down where I want it, now it is time for the anneal.

    As I mentioned I got my grain size where I want it so I will not be messing with traditional lamellar annealing since it involves temperatures above Acm (and is a real shot in the dark with the deep hardening alloys that I work with). Instead I spheroidize my blades, which will yield a much softer blade without messing with the grain size since it stays closer to Ac1.

    So the blade goes into the kilns:


    I always suspend the blades from the tang withinthe kilns to avoid distortion.

    And the controllers are set for 1375F.:



    When the blade comes up to temp it is soaked a little while to get the carbon in motion and then the controller is set to run a predetermined ramping program that will drop the kiln temperature at a rate of around 50F./hour until the steel its below 900F., all while I have a good nights sleep.

    I recently installed a controller with an alarm feature to that I can start the process and set the alarm for 1375 and go to the house and relax. When the kilns reach temperature they will set off my security alarm buzzer in my kitchen, which I patched the controller into, and I know it is time to go out and tend to the kilns. This is more than just convenience since it is very easy to forget and cook blades to death.

    What this speroidal anneal does is causes the cementite (carbon) in the steel to gather together into an evenly dispersed collection of spheroidal globs. In this state the carbon is not interacting with the iron to give me any grief from stress or hardness and the metal will be very easy to machine, grind or shape.

    You will notice that the blade is going in all scaled up from the forging. One of the reasons that I leave my forgings thicker and the reason that I leave the forging scale on, at this point, is the fact that this long anneal time is a very decarburizing operation. When all done there will be a fully decarburized skin on the blade that I will have to grind off and if I am going to cook the carbon out of something why not let it be that nasty black scale that I will be grinding off anyhow?
    Last edited by Kevin R. Cashen; 02-05-2003 at 06:52 AM.

  5. #105
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    cool, the thread is back with more info....that leafy is coming along supurb and i cant wait to see the final etched product.

    Thanks for all this, very interesting indeed.
    Robert.B

  6. #106
    Thanks for a great thread!

    Had a little question, though: Exactly how thick do forge the blade? When I do my twisted patterns I forge the blades almost twice as thick as I want them and grind out the pattern (hours in front of my belt grinder). Was also thinking that with blades with twisted cores one could bring out the pattern in the core by making a fuller by stock removal.
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  7. #107
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    Originally posted by Jeff Ellis
    wow, thats amazing.. i wish you had taken pictures of the leafing bit, but its okay. i'm sure someone will take a picture of ti eventually... i don't want to bug al any more about my sword. i'd like to see the progress of it, but i'd lieke to let him keep his secrets.

    as for your work, if i had any money, i'd have to buy some of course, i'd also have to buy a display case for it, and a lock... and never touch it...
    I have three of Kevin’s swords. Two are pattern welded, Bench eater and Baby and the other is plain L6. We have cut soft targets (Pool Noodles) with all three and hard targets with the L6. When you hold one of his swords you just have to go hit something with it. They are true functional art.

    The L6, which doesn’t have a name yet, is quite simply the best cutter I have ever handled.

    I can't wait to try out the leaf blade.

  8. #108
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    Originally posted by Leif Svendsen
    Thanks for a great thread!

    Had a little question, though: Exactly how thick do forge the blade? When I do my twisted patterns I forge the blades almost twice as thick as I want them and grind out the pattern (hours in front of my belt grinder). Was also thinking that with blades with twisted cores one could bring out the pattern in the core by making a fuller by stock removal.
    This one was left around 5/16" at the spine but I still will not get the heavy starburst curving patterns after this much removal since it will have a diamond cross section.

    Blades with fullers do develop a more curving starburst pattern due to the dept that one cuts into those core rods. This is a dead give away rto the methods of manufacture of a sword even if it is over 1400 years old.

    Swords of the migration period that have been established as being made on the European continent, have very strong distinct curving patterns in the fuller area. Studies done by Ager and Lang, as well as others have shown most of the blades found in Kent and other English sites to have a straight non-curving herringbone pattern (like what this leaf will have) in the fuller.

    This would all point to a very different method of manufacture between the two. The British blades having the fullers forged in while the continental fullers being ground or stock removed. There has been much debate over the years whether pattern welded blades were made in England with some saying that they were not. Many people, myself included, believe that this difference in manufacture is clear evidence to the contrary.

  9. #109
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    Post anneal cleanup and inspection:

    The next day I go out and retrieve the blade from the kilns that have now cooled down to 850F. and then shut themselves off. The first thing that I do is to clean all of that black nasty scale off the outside with my 4.5” angle grinder. Grinding disks are cheap compared to belts and remove metal much faster. The black oxide bark is tougher than Hades and will eat up belts at a frightening rate.

    When all is clean I hold my breath and examine the entire surface carefully to make sure there are no flaws or defects. Then I step into the finishing side of my shop and do any quick straightening of distortion that may have occurred during the annealing heat. Then I grind flats down either side for reference and squaring things up. Using a 36X belt I true up the profile and try to make the sword look as close to the finished outline as possible. It is very important to establish your profile first since all of the edge bevels will have to be changed if the profile is altered later. This profile cleanup also helps remove all of the decarb from the very edges. Now I will spend some time just making sure that everything is as straight as possible.

    Now I cover the future edges with layout dye and lay the sword on a flat surface and scribe center marks at intervals down the length of it. I then turn the blade over and do them down the same edge all over again, in order to get a good “average” centerline. Then the same is done down the edge of the other side.



    Yes the edge area is very thick in theis image, but remember that this is the ricasso area that I did no bevel forging on in order to get the thickness I desire for the guard shoulders. I will bring the bevels up to where I want them with the grinder instead. I have a sying in my shop "grinders and micrometers don't get along" so when I want something done precise I leav it for the grinder. You cannot see clearly in this photo how the edges are forged down farther along the blade.

  10. #110
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    Grinding:



    Pictured are my own home built grinder and my “Hardcore” grinder. They are both wired into the bench, which has a 220V power source that is fed through a main switch that also runs an industrial air system incorporated into the bench. In order to have power to the bench the air system must be turned on. I use my own grinder for almost all of my heavy shaping and much of the polishing and use the hardcore for lots of edge rolling with the slack belt and handle shaping.

    I start all of my grinding with a 36X Zirconia belt that in an unusual green color that I get from a local company that has serviced me very well for years now. The belts I run the most on my machine are 2x48”, although my machine can also run 72” and any size in between.

    The first grind that I do is a very obtuse edge bevel down either side until I have an edge established in the center that is around 3/32” thick. Next I grind in the main flats of the bevels until they meet in the center and approach my initial sharp edge bevels.

    Now it is time to address the issues that are peculiar to this blade shape. This is not an easy blade to grind properly and I have seen many mediocre grinds on leaf blades. The problem comes from the change in profile. Whenever you have a portion of the blade that extends beyond another in a curving fashion, you cannot simply cut a flat straight grind line from beginning to end. Think about it, the angle of edges in the narrow section will be much more obtuse then in the wider section. If one continues this angle into the wide area you will grind your edges off and eat away your curve.

    This also poses a problem for the centerline. I believe a big no-no for distal taper is to ever have the blade get thicker at any spot as you go to the point. If one is not careful while grinding these compound bevels you can very easily lose control of the distal taper.

    To add to all of this is the difficulty in sighting down the blade to see if things are straight and true. With straight edges one can just hole the thing up to light source and eyeball it quite well. With curved edges or, worse yet, re-curved edges you lose your reference planes and can’t just eyeball down the edge. I still do a lot of eyeballing but it is done in different ways.

    I have seen leaf blades that had an interesting corkscrew thing going on in the bevels and I realized that the maker either lost it in forging or what happened was the one bevel was ground in straight and level from top to tip and then in order to save the blade when the others were ground, the wider section had to be off center and then all of the other bevels followed suit creating a corkscrew out of the blade. These blades must be sculpted not just ground. The differing bevels must be blended smoothly together with the mid ridge still remaining crisp and straight. Next time you see leaf blade think of these things and check out if the maker was careful about it.


    I had to actually do a bit of hand sculpting with files and stones away from the grinder on this blade to get the exact effect that I wanted as the edges terminated in reducing curves near the riccasso. I think I will charge more for leaf blades in the future.
    Last edited by Kevin R. Cashen; 02-06-2003 at 12:02 PM.

  11. #111
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    Grinding II

    Now that the bevel flats are established, it will probably be necessary to adjust the distal taper. So now I take measurements down the blade and mark off any areas that may need shaving down. I like to see a continuous rate of reduction from riccasso to tip and if there is a change in this rate I like to bring it back into line.


    I do this by grinding with a slight bit more pressure toward the mid ridge. This will cause the center ridge to take a wave at that point so that when I grind from the other side it will straighten the center line back out but more importantly, it will reduce the height of that center line in the cross section.

    I must admit that it takes A LOT of practice to get the feel for what you are doing on a grinder in order to adjust these angles in a minute and accurate way. I always advise would be knife makers to learn how to grind a knife to shape first before going on to forging. Shaping hot steel with a hammer is a piece of cake when compared to laying a perfectly straight grind line right where it has to be, time after time. I hear some folks tell me how many hours they spend polishing, normally I look down their blades and see how many dips and waves there are in the grind. If you keep the grind planes as smooth as glass, polishing is not a very long process at all. Scratches polish out very quickly, dips, ripples and waves are what people spend hours or days trying to get rid of.

    I always grind edge up and do it a little differently than most others. I have an awful time teaching others how to grind because of this. Most folks grind at belly level with both arms locked in at their sides. I grind at chest level with my hands in front of me guiding the process. When doing delicate work I use a push stick like a pen to finesse things along. One of the reasons that I have never been able to warm up to a Bader grinder is that they are locked in at 90 degrees at belly level. 90 degrees (platen straight up and down) is incredibly awkward for me. I have worked on the same homemade grinder my entire career and it is at a more pleasant ergonomic angle for me. 90 degrees hurts my wrist and is impossible for me to control. I must say that I am an extremely small minority in this. You may have noticed by now that I am just different all the way around.



    It is at this point that I start to also adjust for overall weight and balance points. I keep a scale in the shop that continually see where I am going with the weight of the blade and I have a little triangular block that I balance the blade on to see where that weight should, or should not, be. More importantly after every pass across the grinder I heft the blade and see how it feels. I guess I should mention that I have smoothed down the tang so that I can get a good feel for the sword without hurting my hands. All of my swords are lifeless pieces of steel when they come off from the anvil. It is not until I get on the grinder that the blade starts to really feel right. The scales and the balance point will tell me how many ounces I need to lose yet and where I have to lose them.


    I think it can be a mistake to rely upon hilt and pommel to balance a sword out. To me these are final minor adjustments. By making the bare blade alone feel right and then putting the hilt work on with care I have not been disappointed yet.

    Once I have the taper in and the whole thing going in the right direction, I then start blending the edge into the blade. I have around 1/8 “ of edge left now so as opposed to the heavy angled chisel edges that most sword shaped objects have, I will roll my edge into the blade so that after polishing you will not notice any change in angle. This creates a smooth yet strong convex edge that begins its curve about ½” from the edge and comes down to sharp. I do all of this on the un-backed portion of the belt called the slack belt.


    When working on the slack belt the edge going into the cut will be soft and the one coming of from the cut will be sharply defined. The harder you push into the belt the more radius the cut will have the less pressure the more flat it will be. By using these principles in various combinations you can control many aspects of how, and where, the metal is removed. I like to lay the entire flat against the belt and let it cut near the mid ridge as well as the edge. This gives an overall convex to the blade as well acts to straighten out any waves in the lines. Tip: it is really great for straightening the sides of fullers that are not quite perfect yet! The other nice thing about it is that slack belts don’t make facets, dips or ripples, they just make scratches, and so they are very easy to polish after.

    A drawback of the slack belt is where you are doing your work. You must stay focused because the work will be thrown directly into you if you happen to slip. Another bothersome thing about it, and it is worse in cool dry weather, is that there is not metal backing to ground you out. Now your grinder has been transformed into a makeshift Vande Graff generator. It will be most unpleasant the next time you touch anything that is grounded. I normally just touch the tang to the drill press that sets beside my grinder after every pass to dissipate the charge. This always makes the coolest little blue lightening bolt that can get as long as 2” at times. When this phenomenon is really bad I will take a small chain and throw it over my drill press and tuck the other end in my waistband, but this looks really strange and is kind of chilly.

    Once the edge is down to .025 or so things are just about there (this is good for me, those heat treating in ovens or forges will need more thickness). It is very important to get all of your shaping done while grinding. Even though polishing is done with much of the same equipment it is not the same process. Trying to grind with a polishing belt just wastes time and belts as well as over heat things.

    Next I thread the tang in order to get the accurate weight and feel of things before continuing.


    After I have the blade shaped completely the way I want, then I go to polishing.

  12. #112
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    Is grinding that boring?

    I know it is not as exciting as hot forge fires and sparks flying off hammered steel, but I seem to be the only one talking here. Hello?

  13. #113

    Re: Is grinding that boring?

    Originally posted by Kevin R. Cashen
    I know it is not as exciting as hot forge fires and sparks flying off hammered steel, but I seem to be the only one talking here. Hello?
    Kevin
    I'm reading and learning. Don't stop. Its magic stuff.
    Geoff

  14. #114
    yep, we're just thirsty for whatever comes next.

  15. #115
    I have to say that this is the most interesting thread I've read yet...I've been hanging on every new post Kevin...just awesome...

  16. #116
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    Re: Is grinding that boring?

    I'm out here, quitely paying attention.

    I've just finished grinding a couple of leaf bladed daggers myself, and I can understand you when you speak of the difficulties with corkscrewing, and uneven tapering. That curve really throws things out of whack, and it takes a bit to get a feel for it. Drawfiling helps to even things out where the grinder is just too agressive, but it's still a trick and a half to grind an edge on a concave profile, especially when you have to go back out to a convex as in the case of a leaf blade.

    In short, I wish that my ridge lines came off the grinder that straight.. I spend two to three hours per blade taking the edge down from an 1/8" to about a 1/16" with a file. It's slow, but it lets me control the taper without worrying as much about getting a deep gouge or overgrind and having to try to readjust the taper to 'fix' the blade. I just won't do that.

    josh

    Originally posted by Kevin R. Cashen
    I know it is not as exciting as hot forge fires and sparks flying off hammered steel, but I seem to be the only one talking here. Hello?
    Last edited by Josh Powell; 02-06-2003 at 01:27 PM.
    The smith also sitteth by the anvil,
    And fighteth with the heat of the furnace,
    And the noise of the hammer and the anvil is ever in his ears,
    And his eyes look still upon the pattern of the thing that he maketh.
    He setteth his mind to finish his work,
    And waiteth to polish it perfectly.

  17. #117
    Angus Trim is offline Moderator
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    Re: Is grinding that boring?

    Originally posted by Kevin R. Cashen
    I know it is not as exciting as hot forge fires and sparks flying off hammered steel, but I seem to be the only one talking here. Hello?
    Actually Kevin

    I'm totally fascinated by another craftsman, and a true artist's approach to some of this is.

    I have to admit, I'm learning a lot, and funny enough, find that where you like to grind {chest high}, and where I like to do most of my grinding {the same height} an interesting similarity.

    Much of what you do isn't necessarily applicable to what I do {semi-production for those not familiar}, but learning how a true master does stuff, always is fascinating. And you never know when something one learns, will suddenly cause a lightbulb to flash on..........


    Thanks Kevin
    Auld Dawg

  18. #118
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    Re: Is grinding that boring?

    Originally posted by Kevin R. Cashen
    I know it is not as exciting as hot forge fires and sparks flying off hammered steel, but I seem to be the only one talking here. Hello?
    Dont mistake the awed silence of a respectful listener for indifference.

    If you sense an unobtrusive ghost in your workshop thats probably me waiting for your next post.

    Dave.
    Asps. Very dangerous. You go first.

  19. #119
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    Polishing:


    I start out polishing in the same manor as grinding only using finer belts. From the initial 36X Zirconia, I switch to a 220X aluminum oxide belt. Many makers do not make such a large jump in grit sizes but I have adapted this method and used it for many years now for a few reasons. It cuts down on the number of belts that I have to keep track of and store. It is very important that you get rid of all of the previous scratches before moving on to the next grit or you will have to drop back and start all over again in order to get them and this will only waste the time and abrasives spent on the polishing in the meantime. Often it can be hard to see if all of the previous scratches are indeed gone. By making the larger jump from 36X to 220X the previous scratches are very plain to see. I also dip the blade in ferric chloride in order to make the scratches show up dark against the new polish. I will not be showing any pics of the blade after this dip since it also reveals the pattern somewhat until it is polished off and I don’t want to spoil the surprise for you all .

    Folks without salt baths for heat-treating will probably want to stop at 220X on the polish and not get the edge too thin until after the heat treat. Since I can enjoy the full benefits of that technology, I can finish my blades out to near final polish before the heat treat. This doesn’t sound like too much at first but when you think of polishing fully annealed O1/L6 versus trying to polish hardened O1/L6 (coming out of the quench at 65.5HRC), you will understand my enthusiasm for the salt baths. Without the salts there is the problem of oxidation, discoloration and decarburization, as well as possible ribboning of a thin edge.

    I repeat all of the grinding steps with the finer belts, minus any of the shaping. I am just removing scratches. From 220X I go to 400X and then often finish up with a 600X belt. Now it is time for the handwork.

    Hand polishing is something that I used to hate doing so much that I found ways to make it as short and as comfortable as possible. I have found that if a person has done their job right on the grinder, hand polishing should take no more than 2 hours on a large sword and no more than 20 minutes on a knife. Now I find that I rather enjoy the polishing. I made a special polishing chair to hold the work piece and give me some comfort. I just kick back and have a glass of single malt or a beer and rub my cares away with some talk radio in the background. I have found Bowmore Legend to be an excellent polishing drink, and often keep half a bottle in the shop.

    The tools of this trade are:

    My polishing chair


    An assortment of polishing sticks, smooth on one side and a strip of leather glued to the other. I make the sticks out of Osage orange, but I would consult your astrological charts before settling with a particular hardwood. If you are a Libra Osage polishing sticks can cause Cancer. Or is that, if you are a Cancer Osage can….? The sticks with rounds in the center are for polishing fullers.


    1” wide abrasive strips. I used to use shop rolls but only found one that cut the way I wanted it to. Those rolls were made in Korea and had a heavier backing that made them more aggressive. The supply of theses dried up and I cannot find them any more so I have tried others but the only ones that came close are very expensive. Then one day I was in a bind to get some polishing done and had nothing to do it with so out of desperation I grabbed an old worn out 400X belt and tore it into strips. To my surprise it worked quite well. It worked really well! The thick backing on the belts make them really aggressive in hand polishing and even after they are dead for grinder use they will cut real well in hand rubbing. So I now have an endless supply of hand polishing abrasives at no cost at all, none above the price I already have to pay for the belts.


    Now I go to work. I like to drop from a 600X machine finish back to a 400X hand polish because they almost even out. Machine finishes are always much coarser than equivalent grit hand finishes. The nice part is that all of the machine finishes run 90 degrees to the lengthwise hand finishing so it is easy to see your progress.

    Most of my homogeneous steel blades are finished to 400X hand finish and my pattern-welded blades are no different. Just because it is etched doesn’t mean you can leave scratches. The etchant will make scratches of less than 400X larger instead of erasing them. Sometimes a quick 600X rub may be necessary.

    As the polish progresses I have to be a little more careful since the edges will now be sharp enough to cut me if I don’t watch it.


    I still have to polish the tang area and spiffy things up a bit but I am going to stop here since I will not have time to get the heat treat in before I have to leave to teach the intro course. In the two weeks time I would not want it to corrode on a finely polished surface so that I have to do it all over again when I return. And of course this would only be worse if I were able to sneak in the heat treat and then got rust on a hardened blade.

  20. #120
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    I have a question for all of you folks. Do those new coveralls make me look fat? Black is supposed to be slimming isn't it? I think I look fat in those photos.
    Last edited by Kevin R. Cashen; 02-06-2003 at 07:50 PM.

  21. #121
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Michigan USA
    Posts
    1,750

    Re: Re: Is grinding that boring?

    Originally posted by Josh Powell
    I'm out here, quitely paying attention.

    I've just finished grinding a couple of leaf bladed daggers myself, and I can understand you when you speak of the difficulties with corkscrewing, and uneven tapering. That curve really throws things out of whack, and it takes a bit to get a feel for it. Drawfiling helps to even things out where the grinder is just too agressive, but it's still a trick and a half to grind an edge on a concave profile, especially when you have to go back out to a convex as in the case of a leaf blade.

    I often get asked if Flamberge or Kris are hard to forge. I say no not really, but they are a real b@%#$ to grind!

  22. #122
    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    The Steel Valley. Really.
    Posts
    2,443
    Originally posted by Kevin R. Cashen
    Do those new coveralls make me look fat? Black is supposed to me slimming isn't it? I think I look fat in those photos.
    no, dear, you look fine.

    *g*
    Kevin, if you think no one'sinto this thread you couldn't be more wrong, it is wonderful. I've been after it everyday but haven't got much to add. Not much at all.

    When you were giving out (that is the correct euphemism isn't it?) about grinding, how hard it is to get it right, man that made me feel better. I got ahead of myself so the belt took off all the skin across my right knuckles .. and that hurt but it also ate my gloves.

    A great thread and a safe trip,
    Trish

  23. #123
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    11,759

    Re: Is grinding that boring?

    Originally posted by Kevin R. Cashen
    I know it is not as exciting as hot forge fires and sparks flying off hammered steel, but I seem to be the only one talking here. Hello?
    kevin, i sit in front of a centerless grinder all day. i'm still being trained, but yes, grinding can be that boring, enough so that i've neary fallen to sleep every day while pushing the parts thru the machine.

    of course, watching a beautiful blades birth is another thing, always great to watch. you're not boring, really, rest assured when you cant think of anything else to say, there really is nothing left to say.

    but there is always plenty to talk about. keep up the good work. and thanks for sharing this.
    I like swords.

    ______________________________
    SCHOLA GLADIATORIA
    ______________________________

    If you want to climb a mountain, begin at the top.

    "Integrity, justice, courage, and action - without these, a person is of no consequence." - Don Nelson

    learn the way to preserve rather than destroy.
    avoid rather than check, check rather than hurt, hurt rather than maim, maim rather than kill.
    for all life is precious, not one can be replaced.

  24. #124
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    11,759
    Originally posted by Trish Davis


    no, dear, you look fine.

    *g*
    Kevin, if you think no one'sinto this thread you couldn't be more wrong, it is wonderful. I've been after it everyday but haven't got much to add. Not much at all.

    When you were giving out (that is the correct euphemism isn't it?) about grinding, how hard it is to get it right, man that made me feel better. I got ahead of myself so the belt took off all the skin across my right knuckles .. and that hurt but it also ate my gloves.

    A great thread and a safe trip,
    Trish
    adrian should make it into an article. that would be cool.
    I like swords.

    ______________________________
    SCHOLA GLADIATORIA
    ______________________________

    If you want to climb a mountain, begin at the top.

    "Integrity, justice, courage, and action - without these, a person is of no consequence." - Don Nelson

    learn the way to preserve rather than destroy.
    avoid rather than check, check rather than hurt, hurt rather than maim, maim rather than kill.
    for all life is precious, not one can be replaced.

  25. #125
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Michigan USA
    Posts
    1,750
    Originally posted by Trish Davis


    I got ahead of myself so the belt took off all the skin across my right knuckles .. and that hurt but it also ate my gloves.

    A great thread and a safe trip,
    Trish
    It doesn't take long to realize that those belts really don't know the difference between steel and our skin . I find it is not on my skin that shows the marks anymore, but my finger nails can be really short and odd shaped at times.

    The worst is to catch the very edge of a belt. It is like having a knife pulled across you! I know that most would suggest gloves as a safety measure but I have never felt safe with them on. I really cannot feel what I am doing through them and since I work with a tool rest I am not comfortable having anything that could get caught between the belt and that rest.

    A few years back I went through special Farm-Medic training for the fire dept. and many of the really ugly accidents that I saw from people getting sucked into machinery were caused by gloves. That just sort of put the nail in the coffin for the whole glove issue for me. But I am kind of strange and cranky about things
    Last edited by Kevin R. Cashen; 02-06-2003 at 07:51 PM.

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