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Thread: Confessions of a bladesmith; secrets revealed! (Finished Pictures added)

  1. #501
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    I would feel negligent if I didn't stop in to thank the folks for all the kind words for this thread, and if any of the information has helped you in some way, this pleases me even more since that is what it was all about.

  2. #502
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    Originally posted by Mike Haftel
    Holy monkey arms!!!! What a beautiful sword!!!

    I love how you worked the scabbord.

    I wonder if anyone has ever tried to put a hamon or hada on a non-japanese sword combined with something like this?

    That would be interesting....but you would also have to work out a way to do clay-temporing as well.
    I guess that it would be a matter of peronal taste, but often when one uses differential hardening with a high contrast pattern weld. It kind of makes the etch look funny, kind of grungy and mottled. I think san mai could look better for the same effect.

  3. #503
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    Re: Keep it up

    Originally posted by F. Smith
    You should make your own web page with the pictures following each other allong with the instructions. You cannot only stop there but you can also add pictures on how to make a normal blade also. This would probably be invaluable to some begginer blade smiths. And keep up the fantastic work (you can make allot of money selling them)
    I really like the idea of invaluable information for folks starting out, but this kind of documentation of the process is a lot more work than just making the blades. I like to think of this one as a gift to SFI, in return for all the exposure and oppurtunities it has given me.

  4. #504
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    Originally posted by Kevin R. Cashen
    I would feel negligent if I didn't stop in to thank the folks for all the kind words for this thread, and if any of the information has helped you in some way, this pleases me even more since that is what it was all about.
    That's very cool Kevin, thanks!
    "Ah, the old disco room.......just as I left it!" Cassanova Frankenstein

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  5. #505
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    Thanks

    Good information as I hope to start smithing some too.
    "Qui desiderat pacem praeparet bellum"

    "Ne oublie"

  6. #506
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    Unhappy PDF

    Anyone have the PDF of this thread....

    I'd really love to get a copy of it. The link is no longer working...

    =(

  7. #507
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    Incredible...

    I would like to express my deepest admiration to Kevin.
    Last edited by Paul Mone; 12-04-2003 at 12:46 PM.

  8. #508
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    Good work Kevin

    I really enjoyed this thread, very well done Kevin.

    I found not just the forging info of value but the fact that you feel details are important as well.

    I've done things like scrap blades for defects in the past too, though I have never taken to forging them yet,just lowly stock removal.

    I like Tim's forge design, after being around his,what do you think of it?

    I'm considering building a similar one myself. Then I can start screwing up metal till I get something worth say, making a letter opener out of,and a few years after,who knows?

    Hopefully it will be hotter and more efficient than some of the "kaol wool wonders" I've seen folks cobbling together.

    And lastly I found an interesting link at anvilfire :

    http://www.anvilfire.com/bookrev/mcdonald/mill.htm

    Seems like an interesting and easy to build device.Does it seem a feasible machine for damascus production work?

    Regards,Terry
    Strike while the iron is hot!

  9. #509
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    Re: Good work Kevin

    Originally posted by Terry Orton

    ... I like Tim's forge design, after being around his,what do you think of it?...
    I would have to say that I do like Tim's forge design since mine is virtually the same (even with the now unecessary, over engineered water cooled tip). I have went through 2 shells in 10 years and it would only be one of I handn't got stupid with one of them . The next shell I get I will probably just buy one of Tim's low porosity precasts and be done for good.

    [/B][/QUOTE]...And lastly I found an interesting link at anvilfire :

    http://www.anvilfire.com/bookrev/mcdonald/mill.htm

    Seems like an interesting and easy to build device.Does it seem a feasible machine for damascus production work? [/B][/QUOTE]

    I would like a rolling mill, but only for final dimensioning, not for welding the stuff up. For this I have my reasons, PM me if you would like to discuss it further.

    Thank you for your complimentary words and I am glad you enjoyed the tread.

  10. #510
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    It has been pointed out to me that teasing about a subject and then taking the answer off to a private discussion really provides no information or fuel for a good conversation here on the forum. I must agree, and I also think that it can be the equivalent of wispering in front of company, particularly in a thread where I have claimed to have no secrets--sorry.

    So I am back to say that I thought the last post was going to delve into particular mills and their designs, I am tired of unintentionally stepping on oversensitive toes on internet forums so I thought a disucussion of rolling mills would be a little off topic here, but it is very much on topic if this thread spawned the question.

    Terry actually didn't ask too much about particular brands so there is no reason not to post my private reply to him here, I will not post his part of the conversation since it is up to him to reveal that if he wishes to.:

    " Re: mill
    Tims shells are proffesionally cast by a firm that knows what they are doing. He has been trying to trash his shell for more years than I remember, and it just will not die.

    A very good mill should be able to fuse things tightly, the problem is the patterns are just plain BORING. They look like plywood because all of the layers are parallel. In order for damascus to be pretty you need to beat it up a bit.

    Laminated steel would be well suited for rolling since the layers are meant to be flat and aligned."


    I will admitt that my answer is short sighted since one can induce any patterning they please before final reduction, but I am into the random chaotic patterns one gets from bashing the steel in all kinds of unintended directions while folding it. Most folks are into making the pattern as pristine and structured to thier original plans as they can. Just a matter of taste.

    If anybody would like to call me a knothead or contintue this discussion, fell free to give me a thrashing in the Bladesmith's Cafe

  11. #511
    Hi, Kevin!
    You inspired me to make this one:


    More pics here

    Forging leaf blades is fun!!
    "Now my watch begins. It shall not end until my death. I shall live and die at my post.
    I am the sword in the darkness, the watcher on the walls.
    I am the fire that burns against the cold, the light that brings the dawn, the horn that wakes the sleepers, the shield that guards the realms of men.
    I pledge my life and honor to the nights watch and all the nights to come."
    - the oath of the Night's Watch from "A Song of Ice and Fire" by George R. R. Martin

    my homepage

  12. #512
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    Yes! That is what I am talkin about . Looking good Leif! I had a look at you site, I really like the look of your gas forge. And that is a "cute" little anvil you got there Just kidding, as the old saying goes, it's not the size the counts, but how you use it .

    I will reciprocate with a link to your site the next time I update my links page. Keep up the good work!

  13. #513
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    What?

    After all that no pics of the finished sword...I feel cheated!

  14. #514
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    It is a very old thread - before my join date.

    I've seen the Sword in other threads but I'm sure we'll see and update now.

    A serious read BTW!
    Bartender and Brewmeister for the Pub


    Stranger in a Strange land

  15. #515
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    As soon as I get a chance I wll get the pictures of the finished sword put back in the thread.

  16. #516
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    That was very cool, very informative and interesting. I am curious to know if they (way back when before salt baths and tempering ovens and stuff, if and how they were able to form the complex steel microstructures? And WOW Leif, I am loving the shape of that sword!
    I dunno. Iron is sort-of the Paris Hilton of metals, and carbon, nickel, chromium silicon, etc. are a bunch of good looking guys she just met at a party. - Al Massey

  17. #517
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    Flux tends to displace grime on the surface of the metal, but to some extent, you should have a pristine surface beforehand, because flux only does so much in this relam. Primarily it coats the metal so it doesn't burn at weld temp, as previously mentioned, but it also acts as a wetting agent - bringing the metal into contact more readily. Instead of having a surface impacting another surface, you are displacing a fluid between two surfaces, and the surfaces can come together more easily.

    I.E. Why do they use water when putting on window tint film?

    ;-)

    It's a wetting agent! It keeps the air/voids out, and then you just squeegie the water out.

    Same with flux. Flux fills the space, then when you smack it with a hammer, the flux leaves and helps pull the metal surfaces together.

    Hope this helps,
    Rion
    Talents are not gifts to those who posess them, in fact, they can be burdens more oft than not. Truly, a talent is a gift given for the benefit others.

    Blacksmiths beat it with a hammer.

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  18. #518
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    hey what happend to the pics?

  19. #519
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    Quote Originally Posted by timf View Post
    hey what happend to the pics?
    I hope I'm not overstepping, or anything, but I agree it's kind of a letdown to read the whole (great!) thread and not have pictures at the end, so I found a bunch in other threads, and I've taken the liberty of posting them below.
    Hopefully Mr. Boas will eventually post bigger photos, but these will work for now.

    Enjoy!




















  20. #520
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    I know that I am rather late to the party but I wanted to make my first forum post as a reply to this thread to thank Mr. Cashen for allowing us to see the process, from start to finish, of one of the most beautiful sword I've ever had the pleasure of seeing. It took me nearly three days of reading, whenever I could, to finish the entire thread but the lessons that I learned will prove, I am sure, to be invaluable.

    I have been considering getting involved in bladesmithing and this thread has proved to be quite an encouragement. While I do not believe that I could ever attain the level of artistry that Mr. Cashen displays, I am confident that whatever I do produce will be that much better for having watched the birth of this blade. What a rare treat!

    Thank you so very, very much.

  21. #521
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    they are beautiful blades but deadly could 02 be used instead of 01 with a combination of L6?

  22. #522
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    O-2 would be darker than the O-1 but good luck finding any, I can't locate a source for O-2.

    SO I am thinking Thermite burn?

  23. #523
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    O2 and L6 is my favorite combination for contrast, the O2 will etch almost black. But alas Carpenter steel was the main producer of O2 in the U.S. and quit offering it around 10 years ago. When I hear they were done with it I imediately made a trip to the outlet in Troy MI (which also is no longer around) and filled my arms with all the end cuts that I could. I still have a very small stock pile of it that I never use for anything but the most special of projects, but when I do I often add it to the O1 and L6 mix and the differences are very striking when set directly beside O1. Oi while can be made to look dark is still only shades of gray, while the O2 can approach an actual black. It also welds VERY nicely.

  24. #524
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    Just reread the whole thread again, with a nice bologna sandwhich to keep me company. I have to reiterate just how awesome this thread is, and just how very cool and knowledgeable of a guy Kevin is. I learned so much just reading it again with the little bit of understanding i have gained since the last time i read it through and understood alot more. Truly an invaluable resource and i look forward to trying my hands at pattern welding.
    I dunno. Iron is sort-of the Paris Hilton of metals, and carbon, nickel, chromium silicon, etc. are a bunch of good looking guys she just met at a party. - Al Massey

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