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Thread: Hamon; Grinding after HT effects?

  1. #1

    Hamon; Grinding after HT effects?

    Another question which is on my mind for quiet a while now and I could not yet get a satisfiying answer to...

    How much does the grinding after a successful HT (japanese) affect the hamon (shape, width, detail,...).

    I don't mean the finish, just the ammount of metal removed.

    for ex.: if you've got a tanto where's the edge about 0.8 mm thick before HT... well when you grind it down to "zero" you remove some metal... now what about if the initial width was 1.5mm (or more) you end up removeing much more steel... how does this affect the hamon?

    are there any "general" ruels or "laws" which apply?

    One reason why I ask is: I've got to "repolish" (more likely to reshape) an older blade I've made... and well the hamon is quiet "lovley" (has as well a nice Kean boshi) now I wonder (before I finally do it) what will happen to the hamon (the blade will loose some width...) -> will I risk to loose a lot of detail or may even "gain" some or nothing at all?

    Daniel
    Daniel Gentile
    RONIN - Japanese Swords

    http://www.ronin.to
    -------------------------------------
    Open Your Eyes
    Live The Moment
    From Nothing Into Nothing

  2. #2
    You probably wont have to worry about it, though it really depends on the steel, and exact technique used. If youre using a very low hardenable steel there could be problems if you have to remove more than a small amount of material, if its not really low in hardenability, there wont be a big problem, at least I dont think. Ive never done anything to really "look into" this, but hardening depth would be the biggest factor.
    Joe Renner

    "While the man can bring balance to a sword, it will ultimately bring balace to him"

  3. #3
    Thanks joseph,

    (ps: what time is it at your place?)


    Well, no, hardenability should not have been the problem (unless I don't grind into the core)

    It's a kobuse-gitae construction with a shingane (jacket) of more than 50'000 layers of steel and a kawagane (core) with about 30'000 layers.

    the shingane is made of plain carbon steel (with about 1%C initially so after all the folding&welding I've estimatet it to be around 0.8%)
    and the kawagane is lowcarbon (0.2%)


    Daniel
    Daniel Gentile
    RONIN - Japanese Swords

    http://www.ronin.to
    -------------------------------------
    Open Your Eyes
    Live The Moment
    From Nothing Into Nothing

  4. #4
    its 5:58 here. That sounds like a nice blade, too.
    Joe Renner

    "While the man can bring balance to a sword, it will ultimately bring balace to him"

  5. #5
    Originally posted by Joseph Renner
    its 5:58 here. That sounds like a nice blade, too.

    here it' 1:00am (I like to work till late )


    Well yes it WAS a nice blade, if only it would not have seen a bit of abuse (unwanted accident)... well the edge is a little bit damaged... but I guess I can get it lookin' good again...

    If it'll turn out good I'll post a pic (as soon as it is completly finished (fittings...))



    Daniel
    Daniel Gentile
    RONIN - Japanese Swords

    http://www.ronin.to
    -------------------------------------
    Open Your Eyes
    Live The Moment
    From Nothing Into Nothing

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