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Thread: Latin inscription on swords

  1. #1
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    Latin inscription on swords

    If you would make one or two inscriptions or your sword, what would it be?

    e.g. Would it be the classic:
    Deus vult? "God wills it"

    As for me, it must be Latin of course. I guess that I would like something that reflects me and my values in life, such as loyalty and honour (I guess that most of us sword nerds have this values). But I dont want it to be to cheesy if you know what I mean...Any suggestions?

    By the way:
    I found an excellent latin translater, but the grammatical is just beyond me...
    http://lysy2.archives.nd.edu/cgi-bin....exe?deus+vult

  2. #2
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    The letters and numbers

    after the word refer to the words congugation (if a verb) and declension (if a noun or adjective).

    Myself, I would have Virtute et Armis or Ab Armis.
    "Someone's boring me, I think it's me" Dylan Thomas

  3. #3
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    My favourite has always been "Ultima Ratio Regum" which is "The last argument of Kings". This is what Louis XIV of France had stamped on his cannon.

    Kind of says it all...

  4. #4
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    Thank you for the ideas, I really like the "Ultima Ratio Regum" and the fact that its been used.

    I just need to find something of my own...How do you browse for latin phrases??!

    This is said to be on the sword of St Maurice:
    BENEDICTVS DOS DES MEVS QVI DOCET MANVS

    Anybody knows what it means?


    ---
    ps. Mr. Wood, have you ever been in Wales (Dylan Thomas)?

  5. #5
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    My favorite...

    Manui dat Cognitio Vires

    "Knowledge Gives Strength to the Arm"

    UK's motto for its Intelligence Corps, but fitting for any sword. It's my fencing club's adopted motto as well.

    A list of mottos, with several latin ones can be found here:
    http://www.regiments.org/milhist/regtintro/mottoes.htm

    I'm sure there are others like it out there... good luck.
    Hammer On.

    Chris

    The Tidewater Forge

  6. #6
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    ah, back when I used to live in Wisconsin, the SCA group had a banner "caseum edae ot moriare" (I'm probably mangling the spelling, don't know Latin), loosely "eat cheese or die"

  7. #7
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    I believe a lot of people in north-western Europe used to have sword names such as Gut-Ripper, Skull-Splitter, et cetera.

  8. #8
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    There's always the old Scots crown motto - 'Nemo Me Impune Lacessit' which is 'Who dares meddle with me?'

  9. #9
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    I just remembered a favorite:
    "Who dare wins" - Some UK corps as well I think (SAS?), but I dont know the latin words for it

  10. #10
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    Nice link christopher!

    I found what I was looking for, a motto that I can relate to:

    Spectamur agendo = By our deeds we are known

    and of course:
    Who dares wins - SAS, but was is the latin phrase for that brilliant motto??

  11. #11
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    How about this:
    ergo bibamus = therefore, let us drink

    check out this link:
    http://www.24hourtranslations.co.uk/lphrases.htm


    I also found this:
    >What, if any, difference would there be in the translations of these two
    >phrases?
    >
    >1) He who dares, wins
    >2) Who dares, wins

    It is an issue of grammar. In Latin, you do not say, "I love" it's a
    single word, "amo". Similarly, it's not "he dares" but "audet". Unlike
    English, the pronoun is inherent in the verb -- the form of the verb
    changes to indicate first, second or third person, singular or plural, as
    well as changing form to show tense and so forth.

    Therefore, the two phrases above are exactly equivalent in the Latin, which
    would be:

    Qui audet adipiscitur.

    Of course, in Latin, word order doesn't matter at all. Therefore the
    sentence above ALSO means, "He who wins, dares".

    (From this site:
    http://www.florilegium.org/files/HER...toes2-msg.text)
    Last edited by Pontus W; 01-14-2004 at 12:31 PM.

  12. #12
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    On The Mermaid's Song (my Vince Evans S-hilt basket-hilted broadsword) I had Vince engrave my clan motto on one side (Aut Pax - Aut Bellum -- "in either peace or war", Clan Gunn) and on the other side, the slogan of the Wilson family or sept (Semper Vigilans -- "Always Vigilant").
    David K. Wilson, Jr., Laird of Glencoe
    The best laid schemes o' mice an' men, gang aft agley... -- Robert Burns

    See, it is I who created the blacksmith
    who fans the coals into flame
    and forges a weapon fit for its work.

    -- Isaiah 54:16

  13. #13
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    I'd like to see some modern phrases written in
    latin like:

    "when big dog's a walking, little dog stands aside"

    or

    "today is a GOOD day to die!"

    or the ominous

    "Winter is comming."

    Maybe I'll put one of those on my sword!

    Walt

  14. #14
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    Yes, I

    have. I actually went for the first time this (previous) summer. However, I chose the Dylan Thomas quote because that's what the D. in D. Woods is - Dylan. And I like his works.
    "Someone's boring me, I think it's me" Dylan Thomas

  15. #15
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    Originally posted by Walt Ligon
    "when big dog's a walking, little dog stands aside"
    It's not the size of the dog in the fight, it's the size of the fight in the dog

  16. #16
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    Fiate justitia ruiat caluim- Let justice be done, though the heavens fall. I'm not sure I spelled the Latin words exactly right, I'm typing from memory.
    "Young knight learn,
    to love God and revere women,
    so that your honor grows.
    Practice knighthood and learn
    the Art that dignifies you,
    and brings you honor in wars."
    -Prologue of Master Liechtenauer-

  17. #17
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    "Hasta la vista baby"
    ]

  18. #18
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    "Which end is the handle...? Ouch!"

  19. #19
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    I'm italian, so the best problem for me is write what the latin sentence means in english..however: ODERIM DUM METUANT
    they can hate me, is sufficente that they fear me
    (horrible translation...)
    IN FERRO VERITAS
    truth in iron (duels..do you know? )
    Giovanni Rotondi

    Compagnia d'Arme "Stratos"

  20. #20
    "res ipsa loquitor"

    "The thing speaks for itself".

  21. #21
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    "I want to kill something"
    "Go ahead punk, make my day"
    "Let's get this party started"
    "Action speaks louder than words"
    "Think positive"
    "Repent or die"
    "The scourge of God"
    ]

  22. #22
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    How about this ?

    How about this inscription? I know its not in latin but i just love to write this language with the original letters ! It says :

    first prhase (the left one) : Pontus is a Scandinavian

    second phrase (the right one) : Step aside or die
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Last edited by A. Benevas; 01-24-2004 at 01:13 PM.

  23. #23
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    Let's not forget my beloved Corps.

    Semper Fidelis

    Always Faithfull
    A Man of Great Strength, Driven by Pure Desire, Unwilling to Compromise, Never Accepting Defeat... is called a Hero.

    "For He is God's Minister to You for Good. But if You do Evil, Be Afraid; For He Does Not Bear the Sword in Vain; For He is God's Minister, An Avenger to Execute Wrath on Him Who Practices Evil."
    Romans 13.4

  24. #24
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    Nullum Ferrum Acrius Vertas Indicit--(No sword cuts as sharp as truth)

    Or this one that I saw on a T-Shirt
    Dolor Temporarius, Gloria Aeterna, Cicatrices Virgines Placent


    (Pain is temporary, Glory is forever, Chicks dig the scars.)
    "It does not do to leave a live dragon out of your calculations, if you live near him."

    --J.R.R. Tolkien

  25. #25
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    Apostolos:
    The style has a nice Elvish look but what language is it?

    ...and how about "step aside AND die"
    (as the police says to Charles Manson in the cartoon South Park "Come out so we can kill you"

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