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Thread: Identification Request

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    9

    Identification Request

    Hello all.

    How have I missed this brilliant forum for so long!

    I have been trying to identify one of my swords (missing its scabbard) on and off for a couple of years and I would be grateful for any help. (Pictures attached)

    Stats:-

    Overall Length: 39.75 inches
    Blade Length: 34.5 inches
    Blade Depth at ricasso: 1.25 inches
    Length of spear point 10.75 inches
    Weight: 2lb 1.5oz

    The sword is slightly curved with checked leather grips identical to the British 1853 (and later ) Pattern cavalry swords (with the same pattern of 5 rivets). However it has an unusual steel four-bar hilt with a sword knot slit towards the top.

    The blade is not a standard pattern – fairly light and flexible with one wide fuller running to within 2 inches of the tip and a second very narrow and deep fuller running just below the back of the blade to within 10 inches from the tip when the blade becomes spear-pointed.
    The only markings are on the lower edge of the ricasso where there are the numbers “14342” and what appears to be a small makers mark “Latham” disappearing under the buff-piece.

    It doesn’t seem to be a regulation British pattern and the leather grip would suggest a troopers weapon rather than an officer’s despite the lack of issue marks. I’m stumped.
    Any ideas anyone?

    Many thank in advance.

    John
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    9

    Identification Request - More Pics

    Some more pictures.
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    9

    More PIcs

    Last lot of pictures.
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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    England
    Posts
    355
    John,
    That really is interesting. I think the Hon. Artillery Company have a 4-bar cavalry sword as their current pattern?
    Though the hilt of these swords appears to be cut from sheet steel. I wonder if this might abe a clue to your sword's identity?.
    John.M.
    John Morgan.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Guildford, Surrey, England.
    Posts
    13,936
    The only thing I can say is that the bar protecting the thumb is exactly the same shape as my 1821 Pattern made for Indian cavalry:



    Matt

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    England
    Posts
    355
    Yes, the whole guard is virtually the same as the standard P1853 sword, except for the extra guard bar.

    Another clue may be plate 207 in Robson, revised edition?. This is a photo of what would be a standard regulation P1821 Artillery officer's sword except for an extra guard bar. Brian Robson just refers to it as a "Special Pattern"....circa.1860.

    John.M.
    John Morgan.

  7. #7
    It seems to me that you have Wilkinson's patent tang, a numbered blade + the name Latham (proprietor of the Wilkinson Sword Co. from 1861). Wilkinsons were quite active in producing "special" and experimental patterns - why not contact them and ask them if they have records of it? If it is a Wilkinson blade, the number would indicate manufacture in 1866 which also seems about right.

    Richard.
    Celeriter nil crede

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Auckland , New Zealand
    Posts
    96
    Greetings all. I have a very similar sword which I purchased from Trident Arms some months back.
    It is similar with the four bar guard but has a pewter? ribbed grip similar to the mountain artillery patterns.
    The balde is about 32" long, spear point and about 1'' 3/8 at the ricasso. Totally unmarked and showing some age.
    It was advertised as an unusual mountain artillery pattern which seems to fit.
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  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Auckland , New Zealand
    Posts
    96
    I have posted another image hopfully showing the complete sword. Regards, Todd.

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