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Thread: Sword design

  1. #1

    Sword design

    hi, I enjoy designing fantasy sword that would have some use in the real world, and was wondering if a sword that had a diamond shaped tip would have any use in reality. thanks

  2. #2
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    You mean like on some Gladius > ?
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  3. #3
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    Hi, and welcome to SFI (I always wanted to say that), when designing fantasy swords and the like, take a look at some actual historical swords that weren't ceremonial... if they're documented, then they were likely of some use and functional on the battlefield, so you can take somethings from certain relevant designs and incorporate it into your's...

    To answer your initial question, are you talking about an acute taper near the end like so?
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    umm... that didn't work well, but you may want to elaborate on your question some, maybe showing us a picture?

    And if you are talking about something similar to a gladius, then it should be rather effective for thrusts... but it would be easier to determine things if you reference a picture or something
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  4. #4
    ummm, unfortunately i can't give you guys a picture, but what i mean is a 'traditional' longsword, meaning the type of longsword that most people think of when they think of swords, that ends into a <^> type of shape, just not that wide.

  5. #5
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    I believe I know what you are meaning and it could work. Depending on width it might impede thrusting a bit. I'd expect that shape more on a cutting oriented sword, probably. One drawback might be in thrusting and withrdrawing from a target.... This answer is *if* I am reading your intent and design idea properly....

  6. #6
    Originally posted by Scott Byler
    I believe I know what you are meaning and it could work. Depending on width it might impede thrusting a bit. I'd expect that shape more on a cutting oriented sword, probably. One drawback might be in thrusting and withrdrawing from a target.... This answer is *if* I am reading your intent and design idea properly....
    from what i can understand, then yes you are, and i thank you for your input very much

  7. #7
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    Unfortunately practical experience has revealed that excess mass at the very point is a BAD idea- I actually did something similar on a saber when I first started making swords and the added mass at the point caused the sword to bend in three dimensions when I struck a heavy blow on the COP, twisting the sword just behind the heavier section surprisingly severely. The heavier section at the tip wasn't THAT heavy either. Can't say for sure but I think that this will be a problem.
    Tinkerswords.com Fine knives, swords and daggers in the style of the European Middle Ages and Viking Era

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  8. #8
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    Fantasy Swords

    There is no substitute for experience. Some things work and some just don't. It's nice to try to intellectualize it to understand it... but after you've handled a few dozen or a few hundred swords and hit some things with them, you get a feel for what works. Fantasy swords are (usually) not about fantasy universes where the laws of physics are different. The purpose of a fantasy sword is to provide a physical "touchstone" that we can use to transport our minds to a different world, where heroes are honored and honor is valued. To perform this design function it must also REALLY BE a sword and not just a swordlike sculptural object that invokes the idea of a sword. So a fantasy sword is a REAL sword that is built upon the concept of fantasy cultural roots, but must still retain the basic functional parameters of swords. If the fantasy realm involves difficulties or advarsaries not encountered in our world... (like dragons or balrogs) then it might be worthwhile to think about variations in design for the purpose of countering these unusual threats... but the basic design principles remain the same.

    Be well!

    Tom
    Tom Maringer

  9. #9
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    Well said, Tom! Too often these days a 'fantasy' sword refers to objects that ignore these realities- to be functional even a 'fantasy' sword needs to follow the rules if it's to be a 'real' sword.
    Tinkerswords.com Fine knives, swords and daggers in the style of the European Middle Ages and Viking Era

    "Then, one night as my car was going backwards through a cornfield an ninety miles per hour, I had an epiphany..."

    Luke 22:36 Then said he unto them, But now, he that hath a purse, let him take it, and likewise his scrip: and he that hath no sword, let him sell his garment, and buy one.

  10. #10
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    See, I can kind of understand this diamond shaped thing. Seen alot in anime and stuff. Cold steel does it in a way on they're tanto tipped knives(the square sharp point). It is pretty interesting, I can only see it working on a thick sword(like the one I want to make).
    I dunno. Iron is sort-of the Paris Hilton of metals, and carbon, nickel, chromium silicon, etc. are a bunch of good looking guys she just met at a party. - Al Massey

  11. #11
    While handling would probably suffer do to that much weight at the end of the blade, draw cuts could be particularly nasty with those things hanging out the side. It could be used like the on a halberd's back. I think some sort of fuller type thingie on the diamond section would be a must, as well as putting as much distal taper as possible, without making the thing flimsy, into the sword as possible. Would be kinda like a really out of proportion leafblade, no?
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  12. #12
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    ISTR that the Tauregs of North Africa sometimes used swords with a bumped out diamond tip.

    I'll have to hit Stone's Glossary up when i get a chance.

    Thomas

  13. #13
    i'm sorry for what i must do however, are you speaking of a more pointy version of something like the "greatsword" in(oh no! here it comes, the most loathable of all my habits, a video game reference! AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAHHHH!) 'fable'?
    I don't mind the poverty; it's the deprivation of luxuries I can't stand

  14. #14
    I one thing really do not understand very well and that is the tendency to sharpen the point of a straight sword designed for thrusting needle-sharp.
    In the training I had in the past, we were issued with a certain kind of fighting-knives, and the first thing we had to do is getting rid of this sharp point in favor of a slightly rounded point.
    Practice has learned, that the sharp point has a tendency to stick into bone while the slightly rounded point slides off the bone and than into the flesh.
    Regards,
    Paul Tummers.
    there is something dangerous in "Being to the point".

  15. #15
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    In history very pointy swords were often very stiff at the point (like a dagger) to penetrate armors like mail. In practice the very tippy-tip might be slightly rounded. OTOH you've got a lot more force and leverage availble with a sword and 'sticking' in bone is a lot less likely.
    Tinkerswords.com Fine knives, swords and daggers in the style of the European Middle Ages and Viking Era

    "Then, one night as my car was going backwards through a cornfield an ninety miles per hour, I had an epiphany..."

    Luke 22:36 Then said he unto them, But now, he that hath a purse, let him take it, and likewise his scrip: and he that hath no sword, let him sell his garment, and buy one.

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