Results 1 to 4 of 4

Thread: Serrations

  1. #1

    Serrations

    In terms of power-cutting potential on straw, bamboo or mats, a differentially-hardened blade with a 60 Rc edge doesn't perform significantly better than another similar blade blade through-hardened to 56-57 Rc. The monosteel blade is preferable in this case, since it will be more forgiving of poor technique and is not as likely to take a permanent set as the dual-hardness blade.

    Where the differentially-hardened blade shines in comparison to others is its draw cutting potential. The high degree of edge holding allowed by the very hard edge gives the tactician the benefit of more effective pressure cuts and draw cuts at close range.

    So I thought, why not just through-harden, and add double-beveled serrations through the entire blade length? A CNC machine could handle it. Serrations can draw-cut well even with steels that have mediocre edge-keeping, so they should do outstandingly with shock steels at 56-57 Rc.

    I doubt if serrations would have any significant effect on tameshigiri cutting. If anything, they might slightly improve edge holding, since stresses from cutting will be distributed over a greater length of cutting edge. Touch-ups can be made with a cylindrical diamond or ceramic hone.

    Has anyone ever experimented with long fully serrated blades?
    Last edited by John David B.; 01-11-2007 at 07:54 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Trondheim, Norway
    Posts
    279
    The serrations will work as crack initiators, and the strength/toughness of the blade will be drastically reduced.
    "Gold is for the mistress, silver for the maid,
    Copper for the craftsman, cunning at his trade.
    Good! Said the baron, while sitting in his hall,
    But Iron, Cold Iron, is master of them all." - Kipling

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    An Englishman abroad
    Posts
    3,272
    If you've had a blade develop "Micro serrations" or "edge damage" after cutting, you'd not think it a good idea - especially after forking out $$$ for it.
    Bartender and Brewmeister for the Pub


    Stranger in a Strange land

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Southern Illinois
    Posts
    597
    Quote Originally Posted by John David B. View Post
    In terms of power-cutting potential on straw, bamboo or mats, a differentially-hardened blade with a 60 Rc edge doesn't perform significantly better than another similar blade blade through-hardened to 56-57 Rc.
    You seem to start out by telling us the way things are. Why not try adding some serrations to one of your swords and giving it a go?


    Quote Originally Posted by John David B. View Post
    Where the differentially-hardened blade shines in comparison to others is its draw cutting potential. The high degree of edge holding allowed by the very hard edge gives the tactician the benefit of more effective pressure cuts and draw cuts at close range.
    OK, man. You're losing me here. Not following the logic why a differentially hardened blade is automatically better at draw cutting. You attribute this to "edge holding" via the difference of a few points in hardness. So, I'm guessing you mean the harder blade will keep a very sharp slicing edge longer. ???

    For one thing, I think the "better" hardness will be dictated by the steel type, as some are more durable at higher hardness than others. But even ignoring that, I'm not sure how much difference in "edge holding" you'd ever notice in terms of getting dull through wear or something. You can take a big sharp knife and chop a heck of a lot of wood before it gets too dull to slice paper. How many unarmored enemies would it take to dull it? Because if there's armor involved & you hit it one time, or even if the other guy's blade rubs against your edge while winding or deflecting, that microscopic bit of steel at the very edge will be in bad shape whether it's 57 or 60 Rc. The sword should of course still cause massive damage when swung, but it won't have that keen edge that allows it to slice paper, or cut your finger before you know it.

    Some other random thoughts:

    I've used serrated knives on critters many times, and they always get clogged with fur & hung up on the skin. Never tried 'em on something sword length, but I was so unimpressed with the above that I don't really care to, either.
    Micro serrations at the edge seem to be a much better solution to me. I use a 120 grit hand stone to leave the edge nice & toothy. I have noticed significantly less draw cutting power with higher polished edges at the same sharpness level. So I find it interesting how the katana is usually touted for superior draw cutting ability even though their entire edge surface is usually very highly polished.
    The coarse grits don't do very well at all for straight chopping against skin. Some compromise needs to be found for your own application.
    FWIW, I have seen several pictures of fully serrated swords from India or the middle east. The fact that they were actually tried, yet never came even close to replacing their straight edged counterparts, suggests something.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •