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Thread: Self Training, a public service announcement

  1. #1
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    Self Training, a public service announcement

    Many of you have questions about self training. Most people with any serious experience in any martial art can tell you, you can't do it.

    The reason is, people purchase a sword, swing it around, cut a pool noodle or milk jug, read a book, learn things (sometimes right, typically, wrong) and say "I practice Kenjitsu", and then they go out and cut their finger off, or stab themselves in the thigh severing their femoral artery. yes, this happens, and it happens even to trained individuals.

    I will admit to owning swords i have no training with, but I don't attempt to learn how to use them from books (although, this is how most WMA**** practitioners are uncovering ancient techniques that were lost.)

    Eastern martial arts are different though. You need a qualified, (nowadays ranked) instructor to show you what you are doing. Sure, there are plenty of books, but how many of these books can tell you exactly where your arm should go, or how fast? maybe the picture in that book looks like its doing soemthing, but you can't tell. your sensei can show you what happens between position A and position B that made it possible to do it without killing yourself, or getting yourself killed in the process. Also, if something is already available to be taught to you, why would you spend time learning it yourself and possibly never understanding "why?"*

    Even a video or DVD can not teach you about the arts. The instructor can not see you, they can not tell you you are moving wrong. I had a sensei that was learning from video, and had a technique wrong for a year before he was corrected by his sensei, who made and sent the videos to him.
    Not a bad idea, but you dont get the proper instruction from this method, so its not practical. Not to be done unless you have seen the techniques done, been taught them, and had them explained to you. The videos are best as reinforcements, not learning/teaching tools.

    The "elitists", as they are called, are the way they are because they have devoted time and energy to learning and preserving their arts. It shows, because against a self trained, or not as well trained opponent, they can finish the "fight" in as few moves as possible.

    Eastern Martial Arts take years to learn, and it's said that once you receive your black belt**, only then are you ready to learn the art. You spend time and energy, blood, sweat and tears, to learn everything, and when you reach black belt, you see that what you learned is nothing compared to what is ahead of you. Once you reach black belt level, you should also start passing on your knowledge to others. Not only does this help them, but it reinforces what you know. "The true [eastern] martial artist wears their belt around their heart, not their waist".

    IF you intend on cutting anything, be sure that no one is in the area that can be hurt, no pets, no siblings, nothing. You have the possiblility of slipping and cutting them, and you may even kill them accidentally.

    Swords are made to take peoples lives as fast as possible, with little effort. They look cool, Hollywood makes them so romantic, but the fact is they were originally designed to kill, and they still perform that duty very well.

    When you pick up a sword, think to yourself "i am holding a weapon, people lived and died by this weapon, it is not a toy, and it can hurt me or even kill me if i screw up."

    Yes, you can cut things with a sword, and it is fun. I'll quote Gus Trim and say it: "Swords are fun!", but, you need to keep in mind what they can do. They will go thru an unarmoured person as easily as they go thru that pool noodle or soda bottle you have there.

    for an example of this, please refer to this thread, half way down the second page to see what can happen to you: http://forums.swordforum.com/showthr...threadid=53083

    When you are told to find a qualified instructor, its not because people are blowing you off, its because they don't want their swords taken away from them because of a news story such as:
    "A teenager cut off his leg today with a samurai sword while playing with it in his back yard. Swords are dangerous, and we need to control them, it is now illegal to own a sword."
    That is our fear, as a sword community. We do not want these pieces of history taken away from us because people "play" with them.

    If you want to cut, please get some instruction, even if it's from someone you know that practices cutting. EXCEPT, when they show you this, you are not learning any martial art. you are learning to kill, yes, you are learning how to use a sword, yes, but it is not a martial art. Any fool can cut something, but a trained individual can do it much better. There are seminars given by groups such as The ARMA, The Higgins Armoury Sword Guild, and JSA*** schools have seminars too that you can attend for a fee. You would do yourself some good to attend one. No gurantees you will be taught to cut at these though, in fact, it should be expected that you probably will not cut at these seminars.

    Hope this helps. maybe a sticky??




    about me:
    My martial arts experience consists of 6 years training in Shaolin Kempo Karate, in which i am considered an inactive nidan (second degree black belt). I have many swords, i have no "formal training" with any of them, the closest i come to that is with my dao, which i was taught a kata that uses it. A friend taught me a modern form of kenjitsu, and how to "cut", but I do not claim to practice any style of kenjitsu. One of my sensei along the line taught me fencing as well, and we practiced once or twice a week for a year after class. I have training in the Bo Staff and Jo staff.

    I am no professional, and will never claim to be, because I will never be that good, nor is working with swords my job.


    Foot Notes:


    *"Why?" refers to "Why am i doing this move?" "Why don't i move here after this?" "What is the other person doing that caused me to move that way?" An instructor can show you what the other person is doing and why you moved as you did.

    **Black Belt is used in place of "Shodan", the first ranking that matters in eastern [ie kempo and most japanese styles, i am not sure about kung fu or chinese styles] martial arts.

    ***JSA: Japanese Sword Arts

    ****WMA: Western Martial Arts
    Last edited by Jeff Ellis; 06-23-2005 at 06:42 PM.
    I like swords.

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  2. #2
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    Great post, Jeff!

    But alas...there would still be some people out there that would assume that "Since I taught myself how to play the guitar, teaching myself sword will be no problem"! I guess we just have to hope they don't injure themselves.

    I'll put in a plug for Western martial arts as well...also takes years to learn, just from what I've seen. Can't just pick up a rapier with a buddy and "pokey-swingy-thrusty-swashbuckle" without training........well, one COULD do that with a buddy, but it can't be much fun if you're not learning something else worthwhile other than following a book.

    Learning about history and lineage of an art, fun stories of past masters, horror stories of "this is why you don't do this" told by your teachers, the comraderie that forms between students as they struggle together to learn the art, taking bumps and bruises from each other.....that's why I like having teachers
    Restita DeJesus

    "The expectations of life depend upon diligence;
    The mechanic that would perfect his work, must first sharpen his tools."
    - Confucius



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  3. #3
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    Originally posted by Restita DeJesus

    Learning about history and lineage of an art, fun stories of past masters, horror stories of "this is why you don't do this" told by your teachers, the comraderie that forms between students as they struggle together to learn the art, taking bumps and bruises from each other.....that's why I like having teachers
    yes, thats the fun part.. the stories of how your sensei busted his hand 5 times and his other hand 6, and can break a board with his fingertips and not feel a thing.

    and how his sensei told him he could have the school when he could put his hand thru a freefalling piece of paper.

    the stories are great, the history even moreso, finding out that the founder of your art ended up in jail for beng japanese really strikes a nerve tho.
    I like swords.

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    If you want to climb a mountain, begin at the top.

    "Integrity, justice, courage, and action - without these, a person is of no consequence." - Don Nelson

    learn the way to preserve rather than destroy.
    avoid rather than check, check rather than hurt, hurt rather than maim, maim rather than kill.
    for all life is precious, not one can be replaced.

  4. >I will admit to owning swords i have no training with, but I don't attempt to learn how to use them from books (although, this is how most western sword practitioners are uncovering ancient techniques that were lost.)>

    Just to clarify a little- yes, we are doing it that way in WMA because we have no other choice, but it can only work if done in a very careful and methodical way. For example, to reconstruct Highland broadsword play, I studied modern fencing at a local club while studying 18th-century broadsword manuals, interpreting them, and testing my interpretations in practice. After several years and hundreds of hours of research, I was still correcting errors in my interpretation, and there are probably still errors to correct. In reconstructed Western sword arts, that's just part of the process. There's no way anyone could just pick up a book, start practicing in their backyard, and get it right. Any one technique required many hours of puzzling over the original source, checking it out in practice, comparing it to what other researchers were doing, checking the source again, testing again, and so forth ad infinitum. That's how we all do it, so it's not really the same as "learning swordsmanship from books." In general, I would agree that a qualified teacher is essential.
    "Am fear a thug buaidh air fhein, thug e buaidh air namhaid."

  5. #5
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    Please, mods, please...make this a sticky.

    And I'll pray to the newbie gods that they actually read this before they ask another silly question about self training!

    Well written Jeff!

    Maybe this can be stickied in the general, beginner and JSA sections.
    - What really scares the heck out of me is that stupid people are out-breeding the smart ones.

  6. #6
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    What would JSA stylists do if they - like the WMA people - have nothing but moldy books to learn from?
    <><><> <><><> <><><>
    Do what thy manhood bids thee do,
    from none but self expect applause;
    He noblest lives and noblest dies
    who makes and keeps his self-made laws.

    -Sir Richard Francis Burton

  7. #7
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    Originally posted by Douglas S
    What would JSA stylists do if they - like the WMA people - have nothing but moldy books to learn from?
    that isnt the case though. they stopped using their swords in battle a little over half a century ago, and things haven't been forgotten yet.

    as i said, they are teching it, why screw it up?
    I like swords.

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    "Integrity, justice, courage, and action - without these, a person is of no consequence." - Don Nelson

    learn the way to preserve rather than destroy.
    avoid rather than check, check rather than hurt, hurt rather than maim, maim rather than kill.
    for all life is precious, not one can be replaced.

  8. #8
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    Originally posted by Restita DeJesus
    Great post, Jeff!

    But alas...there would still be some people out there that would assume that "Since I taught myself how to play the guitar, teaching myself sword will be no problem"! I guess we just have to hope they don't injure themselves.

    I'll put in a plug for Western martial arts as well...also takes years to learn, just from what I've seen. Can't just pick up a rapier with a buddy and "pokey-swingy-thrusty-swashbuckle" without training........well, one COULD do that with a buddy, but it can't be much fun if you're not learning something else worthwhile other than following a book.

    Learning about history and lineage of an art, fun stories of past masters, horror stories of "this is why you don't do this" told by your teachers, the comraderie that forms between students as they struggle together to learn the art, taking bumps and bruises from each other.....that's why I like having teachers
    Yes, yes, you just can single out eastern martial arts, all martial arts take time, dedication and loads of practice. Thanks for the insight Mr. Thompson, I didn't realize Western swords arts were at such a "lost," I've always thought people preserved them somehow, which was why people wrote about it. Thanks.

  9. #9
    It might also be useful to just have a general guide for newbies on what is apropriate to do when you dont have an instructor available. I.E. Some links to practice swords that arnt gonna chop a leg off.

    You're probably right to be as paranoid as you are about 'newbies' who just are interested in chopping things in half, but to the slim minority who are actually interested in learning something safely, it'd be nice to just have some links in a sticky post of where to go, what books to look at, and what equipment to get to be safe for any type of sword play.

    I'm with the original poster in saying that i'll probably have a few practice swords that i dont have any formal training in, and thus cannot claim any standing or rank with, but heck, at least i'm safe with em and take careful consideration about what i do with them.

    Instead of belitteling newbies by saying thier questions are silly, direct and guide them to the correct location to eliminate the effects of ignorance. Isn't this what teaching is all about?

    I think you're assuming idiocy, but the reality is that it's mostly just ignorance. If the community at large would assume a bit higher estimation of people that are new to sword stuff, then there wouldn't be as much of a chance of people doing stupid stuff, since they'd be directed away from it by people who know what they're doing.

    Food for thought anyway.
    Kodiak Alaska
    Newbie

  10. >Thanks for the insight Mr. Thompson, I didn't realize Western swords arts were at such a "lost," I've always thought people preserved them somehow, which was why people wrote about it.>

    The classical Italian and French schools of foil, epee and saber are living traditions much like in the Asian arts, with lineages of instructors going back to the 18th century and perhaps earlier in some cases, passed down from master to apprentice in the traditional way. This is what is called "classical fencing." (And is quite distinct from "sport fencing" or "Olympic fencing" though the weapons are the same.)
    But other Western sword arts, such as Highland broadsword, German medeival longsword, Spanish rapier, etc are dead arts that are being reconstructed and revived from the old fencing manuals. This is what is called "historical fencing."
    Some classical fencers are also historical fencers, but not all.
    To simplify-

    Sport fencing= the modern sports of foil, epee and saber, practiced for competitive purposes
    Classical fencing= the martial art of foil, epee and saber, taught as if in preparation for a duel with sharps
    Historical fencing= the martial arts of older weapons which died out in mainstream fencing and are now being revived

    In the context of this discussion, the important thing to understand is that historical fencing research is a very complex process and does not just involve picking up a book and a sword and going at it.
    "Am fear a thug buaidh air fhein, thug e buaidh air namhaid."

  11. #11
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    Upon re-reading my post, I kind of want to add on a comment to clarify my statement about
    Can't just pick up a rapier with a buddy and "pokey-swingy-thrusty-swashbuckle" without training........well, one COULD do that with a buddy, but it can't be much fun if you're not learning something else worthwhile other than following a book.
    I just wanted to clarify that there's nothing wrong with using books or manuscipts as learning reference....so long as the practioner takes steps necessary if they want to become 'proficient" (instead of just knowledgable of technique)

    .....To back up Chris Thompson's point.....
    (" the important thing to understand is that historical fencing research is a very complex process and does not just involve picking up a book and a sword and going at it.")

    My best friend studies historical fencing under an instructor, and I've seen some of the books that she uses as reference...great books! ...And she practices with people that have at least some experience practicing either 1) under someone who has seriously studied and analyzed the old books, manuscripts & treastises (sp?) or 2) under recognized instructors. She studies and analyzes these books and documents, as well as does extensive research to augment her studies and travel to seminars. She doesn't just want to know "how to do the technique"......techinques themselves can be relatively easy to learn, (depending on the person).....But its the SKILL in the timing, placement, measure, etc. of these techniques, and how to apply or modify these skills against other styles of fence, that she desires to learn. "Research, practice, 'oops-try-again", research more, test. research even more, test more". Same holds true will all her classmates.

    Its true that much of WMA's (as well as Eastern arts) preservation today, is due to dedicated people that have studied the books & manuscripts, invested time and dollars in travel to study under recognized teachers, and invested even more time in practice. I applaud WMA for the preservation of the arts.
    Restita DeJesus

    "The expectations of life depend upon diligence;
    The mechanic that would perfect his work, must first sharpen his tools."
    - Confucius



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  12. #12
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    One thing in WMA is the diversity and change in weapons over time.

    The cavalry manuals of the 18th and 19th centuries don't help much for rapier of the 17th century. The manuals for rapier are usless for the viking era broadsword. JSA has a much smaller varient pool to work within.

    I'd like to see it re-written wrt WMA before being made a sticky.

    Thomas

  13. #13
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    Originally posted by Chris Thompson

    Sport fencing= the modern sports of foil, epee and saber, practiced for competitive purposes
    Classical fencing= the martial art of foil, epee and saber, taught as if in preparation for a duel with sharps
    Historical fencing= the martial arts of older weapons which died out in mainstream fencing and are now being revived
    Historical fencing, , I would love to learn the spanish rapier (or any other rapier styles), or any one-handed sword (like a jian) with a light, quick, and well-balanced blade. I am glad to hear people are taking the rights steps in reviving the old world. (I feel my interest in euro swords/weaponary sparking once more.)

    Getting back onto the topic. I agree, books are great for reference, but they are really hard to practice from, unless you already have some background in a particular art, meaning trained for 3 years, stopped for 5, picking it up again. However, no book can ever replace a teacher, unless your have a teacher and he's no good, then its about time to find a new one .

  14. #14
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    Originally posted by Thomas Powers
    One thing in WMA is the diversity and change in weapons over time.

    The cavalry manuals of the 18th and 19th centuries don't help much for rapier of the 17th century. The manuals for rapier are usless for the viking era broadsword. JSA has a much smaller varient pool to work within.

    I'd like to see it re-written wrt WMA before being made a sticky.

    Thomas
    thomas, the only reason i didnt put much about WMA in is because i have no expereince in a traditional learning situation with WMA, nor do i have any idea of the mindset of a WMA practitioner.

    i spent 6 years in a kempo dojo, i hope i have some idea of the mindset of an eastern martial arts practitioner.

    if you write a piece on WMA, and pm it to me, i will gladly edit it into my post with credit given to you. i can not write it, though, as it's not my area. i just felt that it was something that needed to be written so it could/might explain why you see elitists "pick on" people that self train.

    another thing, if you come online and ask for tips on self training, and you get mocked or "lectured" do not take offense at it. don't feel as though "this is a forum that is for these things yet no one wants to teach me about it" the fact is, they want you to learn aout it, but they can not give you instruction over the internet.
    I like swords.

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    learn the way to preserve rather than destroy.
    avoid rather than check, check rather than hurt, hurt rather than maim, maim rather than kill.
    for all life is precious, not one can be replaced.

  15. #15
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    Wink

    Very good post, Jeff.
    Some of my observations: even steel (re-enactment) blunts or (wooden) wasters can inflict serious damage and occasionally cause death! To give the 'newbies' an idea, some years ago, the members of our training group were given a try with the (only one around in our group) sharp sword. We were cutting wooden posts, roughly 1/2 by 2". The more experienced swordsmen hit it right immediately and then tried the same with their blunts. This was the time I was really surprised to see what a blunt can do; getting the right swing, my reliable Norman went right through the wood!!
    Second, although I love to study the medieval masters (latest fun is 'Jeu de la Hache', just great to see what pole-arms can do), one needs to know some 'basics', before trying the 'serious' stuff.
    Well, in WMA, there are several places to learn the basics. Although I don't always agree with their ideas on swordfighting, the SCA does teach basic safety!
    When it comes to 'self training', that's one of the nice things in WMA; in our group, after some gradings, one can become a 'free scholar'. It simply means, you've mastered the basics (and beyond) and now, together with a training/sparring buddy, keep learning and appreciate the 'meisterhau'.

    Regards, Roel
    Ships will sink, cattle die, but the names of the great warriors shall live forever.

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    While I agree with most of the comments on self-training from books there are now video tapes and DVDs of forms available.

    You certainly will not learn how to cut safely or spar safely from a video but I am curious regarding learning a form.

    I have not learned my sword form from a video but I wonder how the rest of the posters to this thread feel about video training.

    Again - I am only asking about learning forms or kata NOT cutting or sparring which are dangerous pactices that I agree should never be done with out skilled training.

    By the way, I do not work with a "live" blade and I assume that any private practice would be with a "safe" blade. Practicing solo with a sharp blade is foolish in my opinion. If you do have an accident (even experts mess up) you could be in very dire straits and I don't mean the rock band.

  17. #17
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    Originally posted by Arnold T
    While I agree with most of the comments on self-training from books there are now video tapes and DVDs of forms available.

    You certainly will not learn how to cut safely or spar safely from a video but I am curious regarding learning a form.

    I have not learned my sword form from a video but I wonder how the rest of the posters to this thread feel about video training.

    Again - I am only asking about learning forms or kata NOT cutting or sparring which are dangerous pactices that I agree should never be done with out skilled training.

    By the way, I do not work with a "live" blade and I assume that any private practice would be with a "safe" blade. Practicing solo with a sharp blade is foolish in my opinion. If you do have an accident (even experts mess up) you could be in very dire straits and I don't mean the rock band.
    i added this to the post., i cant believe i left it out:

    Even a video or DVD can not teach you about the arts. The instructor can not see you, they can not tell you you are moving wrong. I had a sensei that was learning from video, and had a technique wrong for a year before he was corrected by his sensei, who made and sent the videos to him.
    Not a bad idea, but you dont get the proper instruction from this method, so its not practical. Not to be done unless you have seen the techniques done, been taught them, and had them explained to you. The videos are best as reinforcements, not learning/teaching tools.



    i just want to clarify, i am not "justifying" self training, i am extremely against it, what my hope is, is that this thread will quell the arguments that arise when people say "get proper instruction"
    Last edited by Jeff Ellis; 06-23-2005 at 06:42 PM.
    I like swords.

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    If you want to climb a mountain, begin at the top.

    "Integrity, justice, courage, and action - without these, a person is of no consequence." - Don Nelson

    learn the way to preserve rather than destroy.
    avoid rather than check, check rather than hurt, hurt rather than maim, maim rather than kill.
    for all life is precious, not one can be replaced.

  18. #18

    Book Learning

    I like the tone of Arnold T's post. You could flesh that out a little more and make that a very well written sticky for the question of book/video learning.

    Glenn Collier
    Last edited by glenncollier; 06-23-2005 at 06:46 PM.

  19. #19
    Originally posted by Jeff Ellis
    just want to clarify, i am not "justifying" self training, i am extremely against it, what my hope is, is that this thread will quell the arguments that arise when people say "get proper instruction"
    The majority of the arguments stem from poorly worded responses to this question. Many of them are perceived as contemptuous responses to an honest question. If the person asking is new to the forum, treat them as a welcome guest and use a little tact when answering their posts. After all, why have a 'Beginners Sword Forum' if you dont give them the benefit of your learned guiding hand?


    Glenn Collier

    "Manners go a long way, even on the internet..."
    Last edited by glenncollier; 06-23-2005 at 07:00 PM.

  20. #20
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    Re: Book Learning

    Originally posted by glenncollier
    I like the tone of Arnold T's post. You could flesh that out a little more and make that a very well written sticky for the question of book/video learning.

    Glenn Collier
    Glenn, excuse me, but i don't see how Arnolds question answers anything about videos/dvd's as good options for learning a martial art.

    maybe i missed it?? i read this:

    Originally posted by Arnond T
    While I agree with most of the comments on self-training from books there are now video tapes and DVDs of forms available.

    You certainly will not learn how to cut safely or spar safely from a video but I am curious regarding learning a form.

    I have not learned my sword form from a video but I wonder how the rest of the posters to this thread feel about video training.

    Again - I am only asking about learning forms or kata NOT cutting or sparring which are dangerous pactices that I agree should never be done with out skilled training.

    By the way, I do not work with a "live" blade and I assume that any private practice would be with a "safe" blade. Practicing solo with a sharp blade is foolish in my opinion. If you do have an accident (even experts mess up) you could be in very dire straits and I don't mean the rock band.
    he is asking a question about if videos can teach you something that needs to be critiqued thoroughly before it is considered "good".

    i was teaching my friend basic kempo, and got into a few kata i have, he didnt get them right, but each time he practiced it, he got better and better, then, when he was doing it better than he was before, i showed him little points that he had to focus on in it, and he focused on them until he was even better than before. a video can not tell you that you placed a foot wrong, or that you are off balance.

    Glenn, i'm not tyring to be rude, but i just don't agree with you.

    Self training,book training,video/dvd training, telepathically training, cd/cassette tape training, being told on the internet how to do something, these are no good unless you have someone that can see what you are doing wrong. that is what the dojo is for. that is what study groups are for.
    I like swords.

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    learn the way to preserve rather than destroy.
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    for all life is precious, not one can be replaced.

  21. #21
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    Originally posted by Jeff Ellis
    Not a bad idea, but you dont get the proper instruction from this method, so its not practical. Not to be done unless you have seen the techniques done, been taught them, and had them explained to you. The videos are best as reinforcements, not learning/teaching tools.
    Reinforcements is just what I was curious about. I do find videos handy to remind me of some of the fine points that I tend to loose over time.

    Another video technique that I have found handy is to video record myself doing the form. I am always surprised how helpful it is to "get the outside view" of my technique. I spot a lot of subtle (and not so subtle) errors that way.

    All of this is as "reinforcement" to help me remember and correct those errors that I can see for myself. The other errors I let my trainers catch. Of course, if I didn't have a decent foundation in the first place I wouldn't know what errors were.

    So I guess that self training is what we all do ultimately but only as a way to refine and remember what we have been taught by our teachers.

  22. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    11,759
    Originally posted by Arnold T
    Reinforcements is just what I was curious about. I do find videos handy to remind me of some of the fine points that I tend to loose over time.

    Another video technique that I have found handy is to video record myself doing the form. I am always surprised how helpful it is to "get the outside view" of my technique. I spot a lot of subtle (and not so subtle) errors that way.

    All of this is as "reinforcement" to help me remember and correct those errors that I can see for myself. The other errors I let my trainers catch. Of course, if I didn't have a decent foundation in the first place I wouldn't know what errors were.

    So I guess that self training is what we all do ultimately but only as a way to refine and remember what we have been taught by our teachers.
    i see what you mean now, but it isnt the same as learning directly from a video. You have foundation, and know what is right and wrong. people that buy the recordings, in order to learn the techniques, with no instruction, do not have a foundation, and end up hurting themselves.

    video taping yourself is a great tool to see how you are doing things. another is a mirrored wall, which is why most/some dojos have them.
    I like swords.

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  23. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Seattle, Washington, United States
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    <stick> Made into a "sticky"!

    This is indeed a very interesting thread...for 2 main reasons...

    1) Jeff's first post was a very well thought out 'public service announcement' that should be put at the top of the forum, to be read along with the other "read this first" stickies .

    2) This thread is a good example of how little disagreements are discussed....no flaming, no name calling, no throwing of tomatoes, etc. Great discussion!

    Granted, there are people out there, that have trained with a teacher for some time, and unfortunately cannot train with their teacher anymore or cannot train within their chosen style (due to moving away, or any other reason). I believe that in a case like that, "self training"( i.e. "practice"), is an expected occurence......that is, if the individual wishes to continue their chosen art. DVD's, videos, books, manuscripts and all that are learning tools at that point, instead of a "learning method".
    Restita DeJesus

    "The expectations of life depend upon diligence;
    The mechanic that would perfect his work, must first sharpen his tools."
    - Confucius



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  24. #24

    Re: Re: Book Learning

    Originally posted by Jeff Ellis
    Glenn, excuse me, but i don't see how Arnolds question answers anything about videos/dvd's as good options for learning a martial art.

    maybe i missed it??
    You did miss it. The part where I stated to 'flesh his post out'


    Go back and look. Its in there.



    Glenn Collier

  25. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Chruchville Virginia
    Posts
    487

    A sobering pic ...

    Just one of the many spots on my trail to get back in the house, I lost at least a quart of blood before the rescue squad got there ( cut two main arteries )...if my gal Sherry hadn't have been there to help slow the bleeding I would have been dead for sure, I went into shock in a matter of minutes...!!!

    I will never have the same use of my left arm again ..it will be handicapped for life .


    I have been handling swords for at least ten years and had been 100 percent safe ...all it took was one second of lost concentration to cause this major tragedy

    I will never practice by myself again ...I am going to be making a pilgrimage to an Iaido dojo an hour and a half from my place ...but I believe that to be a very little inconvenience for the safety of my other limbs ...!!!

    Don Rice
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    Last edited by Donald Rice; 06-27-2005 at 01:37 PM.
    Laughter is the lubricant of love ...*

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