Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: Is anyone familiar with the blades from this site?

  1. #1

    Is anyone familiar with the blades from this site?

    http://www.traditionalfilipinoweapons.com/

    I've been eyeballing them for a while. And would appreciate any input from those more knowledgeable then myself regarding quality. The site states that he has them commissioned from a village and has the 5160 steel shipped there.

    "All the blades are 5160 and rock tempered to 58 to 60 hardness scale. That is the hardest you can get any steel. It is the same hardness as the Japanese Katana; these blades can easily chop off cow's head in one stroke. These blades can also go through a car door. No one has this quality here in the US for Filipino blades! And believe me, you will never find something like it with this kind of craftsmanship along with such high quality steel. Unlike the ones sold in martial art, gun or blade magazines, which are stamped out and sharpened then polished. Also take note that these blades are NOT made with the handle glued or screwed on! Each blade, from the beginning to the end, is one solid piece! They are all individually hand made by a tribe in the Philippines the same way this tribe has been making them for centuries. Every one of these Filipino historical and cultural weapons are actually combat ready to cut through about anything! You can see by reading this information on each blade, they are not made of re-melted spring steel like many other weapons from the Philippines on the market today! Guaranteed, you will not find this kind of quality steel blades from the Philippines anywhere else but right here!"

    If you read the testimonials and go to the forum and read the various topics, it sounds as though they are made well. I was just curious if anyone actually had one apart from those associated with the site.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    ohio
    Posts
    75

    Thumbs down

    IMHO, there's something hokey about sending 5160 steel all the way to the philippines and have the "natives" have at it. he's making it sound like some tribe people are being commissioned to make these weapons the same way their ancestors did. the fact of the matter is, one can go to any blacksmith around manila and have any type of sword made. so my questions are:

    1) why send the 5160 steel over there (very expensive and counter-productive)?

    2) why go to the "jungle" just to have these ripped off swords made?

    again, IMHO, anyone that would go to length and BS about his product is hiding something. so my advice? caveat emptor...

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    New Chernobyl (Detroit)
    Posts
    1,377
    Well, I have one of these weapons, so I can actually speak about these.

    My wife got me the ginunting last Christmas. The seller's overenthusiasm and lack of knowledge about things like Rockwell hardness notwithstanding, it's a very, very good blade. I've test cut water jugs, branches, and meat wrapped around a 3/4" pine dowel and I haven't had to sharpen it. The kamagong handle feels good in the hand. It's durable. And it's surprisingly light.

    My only complaint was that the rattan wrapping around the sheath was flimsy and came unglued. I removed them, took green paracord and wrapped Turk's Head Knots in their place.
    -Mercy to the wolf is cruelty to the sheep.
    -Those who turn their swords into plowshares often end up plowing the fields of those who did not.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    206
    Erik,
    I don't own or have any knowledge of this persons products, but looking at the prices I can tell you that if you look around you can find an original of these weapons for not much more than they are asking for their reproductions. Which style are you looking for?


    Robert
    No brains, no headaches.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Robert M. Coleman View Post
    Erik,
    I don't own or have any knowledge of this persons products, but looking at the prices I can tell you that if you look around you can find an original of these weapons for not much more than they are asking for their reproductions. Which style are you looking for?
    Robert
    This is the problem with good quality. A well-made piece costs the same or sometimes more than an antique. I have found the same thing with Chinese swords, but you could find similar situations in anything from furniture to silverware. The question is then what do you want the blade for? If you want to cut things, I think a quality reproduction is better. There is less chance of there being a hidden flaw caused by age, and you wont be damaging a historical artifact. If you want something nice for the wall, or for forms, an antique is better. Antiques will hold their value better, and they are, by their very nature, historically accurate for forms work.

    All that aside, the site looks like it has nice blades. Am I seeing a single beveled edge on the barong? On my antiques you would find that on a bolo, but not a barong. That might be something that is variable though, I am not that experienced in weapons from the Philippines.
    Josh

  6. #6
    Erik,
    I don't own or have any knowledge of this persons products, but looking at the prices I can tell you that if you look around you can find an original of these weapons for not much more than they are asking for their reproductions. Which style are you looking for?


    Robert


    I was actually just looking for function. I'm an FMA practitioner who is looking for usefulness, as opposed to an authentic piece from a certain time frame. I'm looking for a decent 40" Kampilan, Pinute and Barong. I emailed him about having a 40" Kampilan commissioned to which he responded that it would run me $550.00. Thanks for the comments.

    Eric

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    Originally Posted by Robert M. Coleman
    Erik,
    I don't own or have any knowledge of this persons products, but looking at the prices I can tell you that if you look around you can find an original of these weapons for not much more than they are asking for their reproductions. Which style are you looking for?
    Robert


    This is the problem with good quality. A well-made piece costs the same or sometimes more than an antique. I have found the same thing with Chinese swords, but you could find similar situations in anything from furniture to silverware. The question is then what do you want the blade for? If you want to cut things, I think a quality reproduction is better. There is less chance of there being a hidden flaw caused by age, and you wont be damaging a historical artifact. If you want something nice for the wall, or for forms, an antique is better. Antiques will hold their value better, and they are, by their very nature, historically accurate for forms work.

    All that aside, the site looks like it has nice blades. Am I seeing a single beveled edge on the barong? On my antiques you would find that on a bolo, but not a barong. That might be something that is variable though, I am not that experienced in weapons from the Philippines.


    I would like some antiques eventually but at the moment am looking for real, functional Filipino blades that have the potential for combat application. For me, I've had difficulty trying to determine real antiques from the not so real. Which is what ultimately led me here.

    Eric

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •