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Thread: comparison

  1. #1
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    comparison

    As all of you know, the Japanese Katana's capabilities are blown out of proportions. It's a great sword but some claim it is the best sword ever made and can cut through many unreasonable targets. some talk about its indestructibility and cutting power citing the curve as the secret. If you look at the scimitar, the curve is even more pronounced making it - at least as far as I know - a better cutter. In addition, the Damascus steel process of making the scimitar has made it a legendary & formidable weapon.

    The question is how does the scimitar compare to the Katana? how does the Damascus steel process compare to the differential hardening of the Katana?

    The Scimitar was a great weapon, but unfortunately, it is somewhat disregarded by many.

    Can someone please comment on the above?

    Thanks
    Last edited by Kevin Man; 02-07-2007 at 06:38 AM.

  2. #2
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    I suggest you take some time and study these two types of metalergy.

    I sure Woots/Damascus can not hold an edge like Differently tempered.

    Ive only seen a few Woots/Dam blades, so I have no basis to judge by.

    When I was looking for a knife. I did handle a few Damascus baldes, by choose high carbon instead.
    "Silly Caucasian Girl, likes to play with Samurai swords"

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Man View Post
    As all of you know, the Japanese Katana's capabilities are blown out of proportions. It's a great sword but some claim it is the best sword ever made and can cut through many unreasonable targets. some talk about its indestructibility and cutting power citing the curve as the secret. If you look at the scimitar, the curve is even more pronounced making it - at least as far as I know - a better cutter. In addition, the Damascus steel process of making the scimitar has made it a legendary & formidable weapon.

    The question is how does the scimitar compare to the Katana? how does the Damascus steel process compare to the differential hardening of the Katana?

    The Scimitar was a great weapon, but unfortunately, it is somewhat disregarded by many.

    Can someone please comment on the above?

    Thanks

    Even if I can agree about the HUGE undervaluing of middle east weaponry, especially when made of crucible steel, I think you can't compare a katana with a Shamshir because of the different cross section. Curvature and steel quality are only 2 of several factors to judge a blade.
    IMHO you're comparing a Ferrari with a Lamborghini. Matter of taste, not
    of performance.
    Please forgive my english.

  4. #4
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    At the risk of sounding like an absolute newb and a blasphemer I have to say that, having cut with a lot of swords ( shamshirs, European sabers, katanas, Chinese weapons machetes, viking age weapons and medieval European swords) I honestly didnt notice alot of difference when cutting, at least not int he short term, they all seemed to get the job done. I guess in the end they are all just pieces of steel with a sloping edge.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Hutchison View Post
    At the risk of sounding like an absolute newb and a blasphemer I have to say that, having cut with a lot of swords ( shamshirs, European sabers, katanas, Chinese weapons machetes, viking age weapons and medieval European swords) I honestly didnt notice alot of difference when cutting, at least not int he short term, they all seemed to get the job done. I guess in the end they are all just pieces of steel with a sloping edge.
    You must be very good at cutting for having noticed no differences between
    the cut of a machete and a shamshir. Or the contrary.
    Please forgive my english.

  6. #6
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    Comparing swords is very difficult. I think it is a matter of personal taste and of course for which purpose. Needless to say I am fascinated by Nihonto, Crucible steel blades, pattern-welded blades, and also blades from Solingen and Toledo.

    Kind regards

    Manouchehr

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carlo Giuseppe Tacchini View Post
    You must be very good at cutting for having noticed no differences between
    the cut of a machete and a shamshir. Or the contrary.
    Probably the contrary. Sure, sometimes one is a bit more difficult than the other, but then I try again and its the other way around... For example, recently on my most common target, a cardboard tube supported by a thin bamboo rod within said tube, I wasn't able to notice any major difference in performance/end result with either my viking, my PC Practical Plus or my Dha. I guess I am a newb but to me they all seemed to cut fairly easily. With the Dao by first 2 cuts weren't very successful but after adjusting my stance/grip it was fine. Maybe if I cut something more challenging I would notice.
    Last edited by Ian Hutchison; 02-10-2007 at 03:32 AM.

  8. #8
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    I'm looking at it from a performance point of view not preference. Swords were made to perform in battle so I was wondering what the result would be had the Katana and Damascus steel/wootz met in battle. Which type of steel will perform better. both these types of swords have certain legends associated with them; the katana could cut through metal, etc and Damascus steel was said to cut through European swords. Is there an ultimate process of making steel blades?

    In terms of preference, I like them all, they're all beautiful works of art!

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