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Thread: UPDATES: Leeds, Macao, Baltimore, etc.

  1. #1

    UPDATES: Leeds, Macao, Baltimore, etc.

    Some of you have been asking, so I thought I'd post some updates -- progress on a few, delays on others...

    LEEDS:
    Because of communication difficulties with the RA, we've decided to postpone the Leeds Medieval Studies Conference military history session till next time. Both I and Ric Furrer were slow to receive feedback in time to properly plan, but Ric is scheduled to meet with RA admins on his way to India, so hopefully that'll provide us with a solid foundation going into the 2008 conference. As I'm sure we all agree, we don't want to organize an event with low standards, confusion among curators, or absent quality control procedures.

    For those who submitted abstracts, you'll hear from me shortly if you haven't already.


    BALTIMORE:
    It was suggested privately among some members here that we hold an event to correspond with the Timonium Antique Arms Fair outside Baltimore in mid-March -- a 1st Annual Convention of Arms and Armor Researchers. While I like the idea, I worry that there's not enough time to organize a quality program, and suggest postponing this as well till next year, giving us time to properly prepare. An informal meeting however might still be an option.

    ******
    Those are the delays. These are the projects moving forward:

    NEW YORK: (D2K v.2):
    After corrections, "Dressed to Kill" should finally publish next month. As with everything I write, having had time to reflect on it I'm unhappy with the present version; it will eventually need to be written to book length in order to explore its theoretical bases in full, as well as provide case studies in sufficient quantity and depth to pre-empt those arguing from presumed exceptions (eg. Leonardo with his erroneous Gaucho examples).

    I have been at work lately on a related fashion research project with my New York-based colleagues, and had set aside D2K for a while. But since the two are related, I'll re-introduce some of the new concepts back into D2K to give it even more punch. Specifically, I'm working several sociolinguistic/discursive ideas into it, in particular the Gricean Maxims. Once this is done, D2K will be able not only to analyze the sociological relationships studied originally, but also secondary literature (the "expert" discourse) on weapons research. I dare say, it will be a quite dangerous weapon itself.


    LOS ANGELES:
    I'm planning to visit a photographer/model friend in LA soon to do some photoshoots, some of them weapon-themed. Some very cool stuff coming; I expect to use a number of these pix in the D2K book. More on this later.


    NEW YORK (Bellydance):
    Before I start serious work on the D2K book, I intend to finish my book on bellydance fashion, the manuscript of which is already well underway. A pivotal chapter in the book will discuss swords; it builds on a lecture I gave at the American & Popular Culture Associations Joint Conference 2004. Again, a number of my dear bellydancer friends in NYC and elsewhere have lent support to this effort, so I'm rather excited about it!

    Because this book is my focus at the moment, I won't be as active in posting D2K-type analyses here. D2K had a busy year on SFI in 2006, re-evaluating several sacred cows in the ethnographic weapon collecting community and knocking a few "experts" off their high horses. But even without me personally using it, I hope others will feel free to use its methods for their own analyses -- there are still many more sacred cows to tip over...
    Last edited by Alexander Chin; 02-14-2007 at 07:16 PM.

  2. #2
    PS: Forgot to add --

    I have also been digging up and scanning the thousands of museum photos I've taken over the past couple years, organizing them, and uploading them to share with fellow researchers. Among these are quite a few of arms and armor. See here:

    http://photos.yahoo.com/exhibitphotos

    Note that the albums are organized by departments, not by whole institutions. I've found that departments are often autonomous and follow their own logic in presentation and definition, whereas institutions (especially the encyclopedic museums) rarely stick to one unifying idea. Since there are very few departments solely dedicated to arms & armor, you'll just have to dig for the relevant shots yourselves.

    I'm far from done with uploading, and have barely begun assigning proper labels to the photos. All are welcome to contact me who wish to use any of these photos (in higher resolution of course) for your own research projects.
    Last edited by Ruel A. Macaraeg; 02-10-2007 at 01:00 PM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Merseyside, United Kingdom
    Posts
    238
    Hi Rual,

    Thanks for sharing your photos with us, it sounds like you have a very hectic schedule.

    I would be grateful if you allow me to see the higher resolution pictures of some of the Middle-Eastern armour in the Metropolitan in New York. I have no projects or research I just like looking at armour . The last time I was at the Met was early 2000, and that was pre-digital camera. Due to work and family commitments (not to mention financial constraints) I am unlikely to go back to New York anytime soon. I am particularly interested in mail-and-plate syle armour and helmets.

    Thanks,

    Hisham
    Last edited by H. Gaballa; 02-10-2007 at 06:21 AM.

  4. #4
    Thanks for sharing your photos with us, it sounds like you have a very hectic schedule.
    This isn't the half of it! Doesn't even include my "real" schedules -- work and school...

    Give me till later this week to email those photos to you (the full sizers are saved across several CD-Rs). Of course you mean to include Russian in "Middle Eastern"...

    The Met Arms & Armor Gallery is especially difficult to get good pictures in. In three visits over the last two years, I only got a few dozen. It's always crowded (I HATE museum pictures with people in them!), the side halls are dimly lit, and the glass is highly reflective.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2002
    Location
    Argentina
    Posts
    647
    Quote Originally Posted by Ruel A. Macaraeg View Post
    it will eventually need to be written to book length in order to explore its theoretical bases in full, as well as provide case studies in sufficient quantity and depth to pre-empt those arguing from presumed exceptions (eg. Leonardo with his erroneous Gaucho examples).

    Ruel:

    Until you learn at least something about gaucho culture please refrain from talking about "erroneous examples".
    BTW Do you know any other argentinian? Can you talk to us about your sources about gaucho culture?
    Don´t you feel a little embarrased when the only person here that has some kind of intimate contact with one of those cultures doesn´t support your theory?


    I still insist that you may save a few hundred dollars and travel to Argentina and make some field research. I can guide you to places where people still hunt with boleadoras. Come on, don´t be afraid. You can actually talk to them. Ask them if their knives are there for threatening people.
    Last edited by Leonardo Daneluz; 02-14-2007 at 09:11 PM.

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