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Thread: Production Kora

  1. #1
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    Production Kora

    I may have the wrong forum, but I figure that here and the Kukri Forum are the best two places to check.

    Do any contemporary swordmakers produce a kora? I've been quite fascinated by this blade since first seeing it two years ago.

    Thanks,
    Stephen
    -Mercy to the wolf is cruelty to the sheep.
    -Those who turn their swords into plowshares often end up plowing the fields of those who did not.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stephen Renico View Post
    I may have the wrong forum, but I figure that here and the Kukri Forum are the best two places to check.

    Do any contemporary swordmakers produce a kora? I've been quite fascinated by this blade since first seeing it two years ago.

    Thanks,
    Stephen

    Stephen

    Have you checked the antique ones or are you interested in a production blade for training purposes?

    I also find koras truly fascinating. WHich type do you like the best?

    Kind regards

    manouchehr

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Manouchehr M. View Post
    Stephen

    Have you checked the antique ones or are you interested in a production blade for training purposes?

    I also find koras truly fascinating. WHich type do you like the best?

    Kind regards

    manouchehr
    Manoucher,

    There are different kinds?

    I know very little about this blade. I've only seen occasional pictures of them, and had no idea that they were classified into different types or categories.

    I was looking for a new production blade with a sharp, functional edge. Anything from an ATrim-like "Tactical Kora" to a true reproduction.

    Thanks.
    -Mercy to the wolf is cruelty to the sheep.
    -Those who turn their swords into plowshares often end up plowing the fields of those who did not.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stephen Renico View Post
    Manoucher,

    There are different kinds?

    I know very little about this blade. I've only seen occasional pictures of them, and had no idea that they were classified into different types or categories.

    I was looking for a new production blade with a sharp, functional edge. Anything from an ATrim-like "Tactical Kora" to a true reproduction.

    Thanks.
    Stephen,

    I have not read any detailed classification on koras. As far as I have seen, the koras are divided into sacrificial and fighting koras. Then the style of handles are different. The following one is one of my favorie. Simple but very eiificent.

    BY courtesy of Oriental Arms

    "Kora swords were used in Nepal and North India both for fighting and for sacrificial processes. This one is a fighter, characterized by it relatively narrow blade. 20 inches long, heavy and down curving with a wide spine. The edge is on the concave side. The tip is heavy, 3 inches wide and engraved with the classical �eye�."

    Kind regards
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  5. #5
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    Stepehn

    That is what is called as sacrificial kora.

    Courtesy of Oriental Arms

    "Up for sale is this good sacrificial Kora sword from Nepal, early to mid 19 C. The heavy down-curving blade is 19 ˝ inches long, widening to 5 ˝ inches at the tip. The blade is marked with the �eye� talisman near the tip. The handle is all steel, waist grip with disc pommel and cross guard and a spike tip on the pommel ending as a styled monster head. Total length 24 inches."
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  6. #6
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    Manoucher,

    The difference in the two types seems to be in the way the tips are formed, correct?

    Thanks for the education. I've been searching around the net more and have come to the conclusion that I'll either have to find an antique one, or commission one at a minimum of $500.

    Too bad MRL doesn't sell one at $200-300 range.

    Stephen
    -Mercy to the wolf is cruelty to the sheep.
    -Those who turn their swords into plowshares often end up plowing the fields of those who did not.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stephen Renico View Post
    Manoucher,

    The difference in the two types seems to be in the way the tips are formed, correct?

    Thanks for the education. I've been searching around the net more and have come to the conclusion that I'll either have to find an antique one, or commission one at a minimum of $500.

    Too bad MRL doesn't sell one at $200-300 range.

    Stephen
    Hi Stephen,

    I think so as far as I am informed. There are of course variations in hilt design. Some have handles similar to Indian tulwar hilts as well. They are Indian version of kora I think

    By courtesy of Oriental Arms

    "Another Indian version of the famous Nepalese Kora sword. It is a fighting sword, lighter than it Nepalese sacrificial Kora sword. The down curving blade is 23 inches long, widening to 5 inches at the down dropping blade tip and chiseled with floral design and hunting scenes decoration.. The handle is a Tulwar style with silver inlay decoration, now mostly gone. Total length 28 ˝ inches. Very good condition with most of the silver decoration on the handle erased."



    Kind regards

    Manouchehr
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