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Thread: A magnificent jian

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    10,682

    A magnificent jian

    Dear friends,

    THe following jian is really magnificent with a marvellous blade and really meant for business. Simple and powerful fittings. As a nihonto fan and Persian shamshir fan, I really love swords like this everything is about the blade, look at the beautiful pattern on this jian:

    Courtesy of Ashoka Arts
    "An old sword from China 'Jian'. The fine quality blade of thick flattened diamond x-section tapering to a gently rounded point, with visible watering of layers to the edges and whorls to the centre. The hilt with shaped iron pommel and four-lobed iron guard with black lacquer. The grip is bound with textile banding. The scabbard of wood with iron mounts, the latter thickly covered with gold lacquer, the former lacquered black. A simple but good quality fighting sword. 36 inches overall, the blade 29 inches. China, 18th or 19th century. "
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
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    10,682
    THree more pictures

    Courtesy of Ashoka Arts
    Attached Images Attached Images    

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Oklahoma City, OK
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    722
    That's an interesting jian.

    It's one of the rare ones with dao style fittings and as it normally appears on a dao the guard on this jian is backwards. Usually the concave side of the guard is on the blade side and the flat side toward the handle. From memory, all the jians I've seen with dao style guards were flat or symmetrical on each side so it would be interesting to find out if reversing the guard is common on a jian or if this one was incorrectly re-mounted at some time during it's life.

  4. #4
    Nice catch Chris. I didn't see the guard was on backwards at first. Of the few jian with dao guards I have seen they all are oriented in the same manner as regular dao fittings. Someone made a mistake.
    Josh

  5. #5
    Manouchehr, you made sure to e-mail Ashoka Arts to verify that you could post these pics, right? ^^

    But yes, very nice jian. Very unusual form that is not seen often.
    Click on my website to see my gallery of blades that have a recurve. I've also got a gallery of historical Gunblades in there too.
    http://photobucket.com/albums/v405/NinjaNerd321/Gunblades/
    ^_^

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    10,682
    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Thompson View Post
    Manouchehr, you made sure to e-mail Ashoka Arts to verify that you could post these pics, right? ^^
    Of course, I did Joe. I always ask for permission and I know the owner of Ashoka Arts well. Besides as a moderator I always do this, so no worries.

    This is indeed an excellent Jien. I will ask Alex as I am sure there are different varieties of jian we have not seen and familiar with. The patina on the threaded pin at the end is in line with the patina on the guard. This is truly a magnificent piece.

    Kind regards

    Manouchehr

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Manouchehr M. View Post
    Of course, I did Joe. I always ask for permission and I know the owner of Ashoka Arts well. Besides as a moderator I always do this, so no worries.

    This is indeed an excellent Jien. I will ask Alex as I am sure there are different varieties of jian we have not seen and familiar with. The patina on the threaded pin at the end is in line with the patina on the guard. This is truly a magnificent piece.

    Kind regards

    Manouchehr
    I didn't mean to imply that the handle was recently restored. The wrapping looks genuine (perhaps it was an under-wrap?) and old. This jian could easily be several hundred years old as it is a heavy jian for battle not a lighter self-defense weapon. The wood on the handle was almost certainly replaced several times over the life of the sword, while the fittings match the apparent age of the sword in style and patina. The guard was probably flipped when the latest wrap was put on. A close inspection could see whether it was done for some unusual structural reason, or, as is more likely, it was a mistake.
    Josh

  8. #8
    Also my guess is that the scabbard is later than the blade. My feeling is that the sword went through some restoration in the late Qing.
    Josh

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