Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: A beautiful dha

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    10,682

    A beautiful dha

    This type of weapon is always fascinating. Something that I do not understand is why so many of these are attrivuted to Burma. If you look around you will find very few of these swords that are attributed to Thailand. Once I read that the reason was that the British were in Burma. Is it the only reason?

    The following is a magnificent piece from Burma. Any input and information about this type is really appreciated.

    Kind regards

    Manouchehr

    Courtesy of Ashoka Arts

    " A large sword from Burma 'Dha'. Entirely covered with silver sheet, the lage bulbous lobed pommel engraved with fine designs. The grip banded with numerous shaped thin decorative rings, centre portion extremely finely covered with woven silver wire mesh over paper? The sheath covering with decorative finely executed silver designs of openwork over a darkwood scabbard body. The heavy blade of very good steel, curving tip and a thickened spine. Retaining its original wine coloured hanging sash. Good condition, some age wear and minor denting to silver parts. 34 inches long overall. 19th century, Burma."
    Attached Images Attached Images      

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Posts
    10,682
    Courtesy of Ashoka Arts
    Attached Images Attached Images    

  3. Most dha are attributed to Burma because most of the ones you see on the market are, in fact, from Burma. It makes sense that this could be a result of the British penchant for collecting. This particular style could actually be said to come from northern Thailand as well, as it is a style associated with the Shan, a Tai people who occupy an area across eastern Burma, northern Thailand, and southern Yunnan Province in China ("Shan" is actually the Burmese word for the people who call themselves Tai and occupy those areas).

    More dubious is the common attribution of dha to the 19th century. Granted, many Burmese dha pre-date the British ban on weapons in 1862, but they were still made in the Shan States, and of course in Thailand, Laos, etc., up to the present day. Production has resumed in Burma since independence as well.
    Mark Bowditch
    The Dha Research Archive
    "Let each one understand the meaning of sincerity, and guard against display!" Chuang Tzu, The Tower of the Spirit (XXIII.8)
    "There is no deadlier weapon than the will! The sharpest sword is not equal to it!" Chuang Tzu, The Inner Law (XXIII.8)

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •