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Thread: Horrbile cutting accident...

  1. #101
    This kind of accident happend because the blade are made in china? :S

  2. #102
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jose Luis Z View Post
    This kind of accident happend because the blade are made in china? :S
    No, this kind of accident happened because an irresponsible and untrained person was allowed access to a sword.
    Certified nerd; if you need an Excel sheet or an AutoCAD drawing done, just drop me a PM!

  3. #103
    Would be great if someone can post some good thread and stick it about what the beginners need to check before start using an new katana. So less accidents will happend (i think)

  4. #104
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    Smile Cheap Swords are Dangerous

    Lorraine,

    First let me say how traumatizing it must have been for you. The anguish we husbands put our wives through when we play with our toys is rarely considered by us.

    From your story of the accident I deduced that your husband must have been standing to the side of the target or obliquely behind the target to observe the cutting technique of TJ (highly unlikely if your husband is experienced). Cheap katanas will not cut bamboo because they are often too light and can't hold an edge. A sword that comes apart will travel in the direction of the arc of the force exerted. A well made sharp katana will not need excessive force to cut. Next, this sword must have had only one mekugi. I have a cheap Chinese made katana (read as bargain basement) which has only one mekugi (wooden retaining peg) which is supposedly bamboo for retaining strength. I drilled my katana tsuka and nakago (read that as handle and tang) and added a second mekugi made of oak rod for safety.

    To be honest even good quality traditional Japanese Nihonto Katanas will experience this problem since only one mekugi and mekugi ana are used. Bamboo is stronger than a wooden dowel or rod but needs to be checked replaced periodically. This is the weak point in otherwise the best sword design in the world.

    Although not traditional, some manufacturers such as Cheness use double mekugis with at least one made of brass rod especially those made for heavy cutting of which I have one.

    Please do not be too hard on TJ since it was a combination of your husband's placement, a cheap mekugi, unsharp katana, and admittledly, TJ's excessive force which interacted to cause this horrible accident.

    May God Bless,
    Harry

  5. #105
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    Just Read Husbands's analysis

    Yes, I agree about the tsuka and it seems that this is another weak point I failed to mention. I noticed that your husband didn't mentioned where he stood when the katana blade left the tsuka.

    The red flag was TJ's refusal to let your husband inspect his katana as he mentioned.

    As a practiced firearms professional, I get away from someone who has a firearm, refuses to let me inspect it for safety (after he unloads it of course), or exhibits any number of unexplained things which causes the hair on the back of my neck to tingle. I stay away from this person as he is dangerous. Tempers are no substitute for good judgement. Dangerous , unsafe people very often give a multitude of warning signs. Heed them!!!!!

    Harry
    Last edited by Harry Fletcher; 09-05-2008 at 12:02 PM.

  6. #106
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    Sad

    Im new on the forum and this tragic event is new for me, Im study actually for be a bladesmith and all I can say is "I hate cheap swords" they are unsafe for the user, pets and the people around.
    Im so sad for this tragedy, we can pray for him quick and complete recover.

    I found one picture on internet with one 55 stitches cut himself on one leg with katana on training.



    Swords are real weapons, Have fun but be safe.

  7. #107
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by H. Watanabe View Post
    Hello, fellow forumites. This is Hakujou (I was finally able to come home today from the hospital); I'd like to say that all of your words have touched me a great deal. My wife and I thank you all from the bottom of our hearts for your concerns. However, I do not want for this thread to be focused about me and my health. I am still alive, so all is well; thanks again for your heartfelt concerns. Furthermore, please don't let this thread, nor any future threads, antagonize Mr. Chen and his products, nor any other company/forge/individual. Even this co-worker of mine, whom my wifed named "T.J.," should not be to blame for such an accident. If anything, I am the one to blame. I failed to see the obvious signs that can spell disaster because I wanted so much to help out my co-worker to ensure that he won't hurt himself, nor anyone else, from future improper usage of his katana. However, ironically, my attempts were futile and it was I who ended up injured.

    In truth, my wife has made T.J. sound more of a menace than he really is. I became acquainted with T.J. a few months ago at our workplace; he's very fascinated by the Japanese culture, especially the katana, but because he lacks an Internet service provider in his home (to find out more information about the katana and the culture behind it) and he knew no one who is trained in the art, he had to self-teach himself, as well as learn all that he can about the katana through...Hollywood. T.J. is a very nice man, although he can be quite arrogant and stubborn!

    T.J.'s sword is indeed a Cheness. The katana is a previous generation Cheness sword that has been discontinued for almost one year. I give you my word that it is indeed the Higo, with the Musashi double-ring tsuba. There is only one mekugi-ana, as this is the case with many of the older Cheness katana that have since been discontinued. When I first got the opportunity to have a look at his sword, T.J. told me that he purchased it at a local yardsale for $50, so its history prior to his purchase is unknown. When I was at his house, I asked to hold the sword so I can inspect it further, but he refused, saying that this sword is precious to him and he has never let anyone else hold it. At that point, I should have thought, "RED FLAG!" but I respected T.J.'s wishes, as I would with anyone else's. From what I was able to see, there appeared to be lots of scratches that can be seen on the blade, but all were just superficial. There were also some rust spots that formed throughout the nagasa. I asked him about the scratches, and he said that they were "Battle scars." I should have realized that this sword has been ill-kept, but once more I gave T.J. the benefit of the the doubt since he wasn't able to be taught the proper ways of sword maintenance.

    After the accident in his backyard, he came to visit me in the hospital with a basket full of fruits, some flowers, and a get-well-soon card. We talked for a bit and he actually confessed to me that he has lost the original bamboo mekugi some time ago, so he used a wooden mekugi carved out of a twig in his backyard. He said that he has had the sword for over two years, and in the course of those two years, he has attempted to cut many things, ranging from two-inch thick plywood, 5-inch in diameter bamboo, to even the trunks of trees, just whacking away at them. This must have been the reason to why the tsuka failed. When I inspected his sword earlier today, I noticed that the tsuka did indeed have a crack inside of it, running almost horizontal to its length and straight through the mekugi-ana. So for all you forumites wondering whether the blade snapped or the tsuka failed, it is indeed the latter. The tsuka core, as well as the "mekugi," cracked from all the years of abuse, resulting in the blade flying out of the tsuka.

    This experience further supports my earlier statements that katana owners MUST--and I truly stress MUST-- invest more money in ensuring their tsuka are properly and tightly fitted. As I have said in the past, please don't cut corners the same way a lot of Chinese forges are doing. If you want to purchase a $200 katana for tameshigiri, I'd suggest you invest at least $100 more in having the tsuka redone by a TRAINED PROFESSIONAL. Should your tsuka age, please, PLEASE don't go the inexpensive route by attempting to build a new tsuka yourself. That is, UNLESS you are rebuilding a new tsuka for the sake of learning and nothing more, OR you yourself are a trained professional. OTHERWISE, LET TRAINED PROFESSIONALS DO THE JOB FOR YOU. You will not regret that decision. I would like to refer people to an earlier thread in which I wrote about tsuka being analogous to "brakes" in cars:

    http://forums.swordforum.com/showthr...205#post903205 (Scroll down to the bottom; my post is second to last.)

    And also, please read this thread that was started by Jeff Ellis and pay EXTRA CLOSE ATTENTION to the comments expressed by Keith Larman:

    http://forums.swordforum.com/showthread.php?t=79250

    HOWEVER, that is not to say that ALL katana within the $200 price range have improperly fitted tsuka. Please bear in mind that this accident that happened to me is an isolated event with unique factors that caused the tsuka to fail:

    - Improper longterm usage of katana.
    - Improper techniques.
    - Missing bamboo mekugi.
    - Inability to rebuild new tsuka core.

    Once more, I would like to stress how much we should not put the blame on T.J., for if we should take a closer look at him, we will see that he is in fact a mirror image of us all. There is a T.J. in all of us, so please bear that in mind and always be safe when handling your katana, or anything that is potentially deadly. I would also like to say that I commend and admire those educated folks who try unceasingly to further educate those who are untrained or uneducated in any such field of study. Believe me, your efforts will not be in vain, for there will always be at least one individual who can benefit from your wisdom.

    As to those who are still concerned about my health, I am happy to say that no, I do not have tetanus, although I will live the rest of my life with a partially collapsed lung. My road to recovery is still long and painful, so that is why there is prescription morphine to help me through those rough days! No, I lie! I do not believe in taking painkillers; instead, I look to God for support and guidance. Even if you should not believe that there is a God, I will also pray to Him to keep you safe from harm's way.

    Thank you all so much! Your kind words have really boosted my morale and definitely made my day! I regret to say that because I am still recovering, it seems every breath I make is painful, so I must stay away from tasking activities, meaning I won't be on SFI for a least a month or two. I hope all goes well to everyone here on SFI. You all will also be in my prayers.

    Lastly, please, please, please learn from my mistake. Learn from the perspective of the student, as well as the teacher. Heaven forbid such an incident occur again. And yes, I would be more than happy to have this thread become a sticky.



    Regards,
    H. Watanabe
    Dear Sir, I am so happy to hear that your recovery is progressing so well. I have in my procession a Katana and Ko- katana, from the same manufacture with cracked Tsuka. They sit in the sword stand, but of late I've been thinking of building Tsuka's for them. I think now I will nix this idea and send them out to be done. So know, that you have helped at least one person make the right decision. Thank you, and I wish you a full and speedy recovery. Best regards R.C.goetz

  8. #108
    Quote Originally Posted by Timo Qvintus View Post
    No, this kind of accident happened because an irresponsible and untrained person was allowed access to a sword.
    Absolutely!!!!

    One should never even touch a sword unless they are in the right frame of mind and spirit. There are no short cuts. This is tragic.

    Loraine, even though I've never met either one of you, I do wish both you and Watanabe the very best in these trying times and a speedy recovery for Watanabe.

  9. #109
    Join Date
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    I have been away from the forum for quite some time, before this accident occurred, and came back and read this story. I'm not going to pretend to be a mall ninja master swordsman but I have some experience hunting wild boar with both firearms and blades and have personally witnessed the deadliness of a blade. In fact I've seen a blade kill faster than a bullet, all other things being equal. I don't trust a sword in the hands of a person that I can't trust to hold a firearm. They're made to kill and they do quite well at it.

    I trust Mr. Watanabe is doing better and I want to thank him for foregoing the temptation of pride to hide an error and taking on the humility to share this story publicly for the benefit of others. I have much respect for you and your wife for doing this.

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