Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 26 to 28 of 28

Thread: Persian Inscription

  1. #26
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    C-ville
    Posts
    107
    tofangir just means rifleman (literally "rifle-holder"), the "an" at the end acts to pluralize it. tofangdar is another word for rifleman as well. tofang-chi is rifleman or watchman/sentry.

    a rifle is just a tofang, while a smoothbore is a tofang bi-khan (literally "rifle without grooves")

    hope this helps!

  2. #27
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    C-ville
    Posts
    107
    check new threads on this forum for a history of firearms in Iran

  3. #28

    Tofang bi-khan

    The term rifle without grooves for a musket begs the question... What did they call muskets before the rifled barrel came along? Obviously they would not call it something that was not invented yet.

    Knowing the history of something adds a loty of color to its understanding and value, especially at the time of use. So the history of a word or phase adds a lot of dimension.

    We lose a lot of the context of metaphors over time, for example, the phrase, "son of a gun", refers to a child born on board a frigate between two deck canons used for a tent frame.

    In the book, "Art , Arms and Armor", they have an entire page of this type of metaphor relating to European arms. It would be interesting to that same type of reference for Islamic arms.

    My understanding is Persians used verses from poems quite often as metaphors, its the metaphors used often in inscriptions of arms and armor that would be good to compile.

    Or am I off base thinking in this direction?

    rand




    rand

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •